Jarice butterfield 1

2,186 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,186
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
38
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Jarice butterfield 1

  1. 1. ACSA Every Child Counts SYMPOSIUM Meeting the Needs of ELs with Disabilities Jarice Butterfield, Ph. D. / Santa Barbara County SELPA Director and Jonathan Read Esq. F3 Website: SBCSELPA.org 1
  2. 2. What the Research says….. Research demonstrates that English language learners with the least amount of language support are most likely to be referred to special education ELLs receiving all of their instruction in English were almost 3X as likely to be in special education as those receiving some native language support Artiles & Ortiz 2002 2
  3. 3. Presentation Topics Referral of ELs to Special Education Assessment of English Learners for Special Education Linguistically Appropriate IEPs Best Practices for Teaching ELs with Disabilities Reclassification to RFEP of English Learners Questions and Answers 3
  4. 4. New SBAC Assessment and California EL Standards 4 4
  5. 5. New SBAC Assessment System and ELS Supports Relevant to ELS Universal tools for all (spell check, ruler, etc.) “Desiginated Supports” includes ELs 5 5
  6. 6. New California 2013 EL Standards  Provides opportunities for ELs to access, engage with, and achieve in grade-level academic content while they are learning English  Use in tandem with the Common Core State Standards and not in isolation  Are organized by grade level except at high school  Provide three proficiency levels instead of five 6
  7. 7. New California ELD Standards Philosophy  Language acquisition is treated as a nonlinear linguistic and social process  Set expectations for students to interact in a variety of meaningful ways  Focused on the structure and organization of English and meaning is made 7
  8. 8. New ELD Standards Language Domains Three modes of communication 1) Collaborative (engagement in dialogue with others), Interpretive (comprehension and analysis of written and spoken texts), and 1) Productive (creation of oral presentations and written texts). 1) 8
  9. 9. New CA ELD Standards Cont’d. Proficiency Category Descriptors in each Domain: I. Collaborative 1)Emerging listening, speaking, reading and writing 1)Expanding listening, speaking, reading and writing 1)Bridging listening, speaking, reading and writing 9
  10. 10. New CA ELD Standards Cont’d. Proficiency Category Descriptors in each Domain: II. Interpretive 1)Emerging listening, speaking, reading and writing 1)Expanding listening, speaking, reading and writing 1)Bridging listening, speaking, reading and writing 10
  11. 11. New CA ELD Standards Cont’d. Proficiency Category Descriptors in each Domain: III. Productive 1)Emerging listening, speaking, reading and writing 1)Expanding listening, speaking, reading and writing 1)Bridging listening, speaking, reading and writing 11
  12. 12. Level 1 Description Emerging Students typically progress very quickly, learning to use English for immediate needs as well as beginning to understand and use academic vocabulary and structures o Overall Proficiency o Early Stages o Exit Stages 1) 12
  13. 13. Level 2 Description Expanding Students are challenged to increase their English skills in more contexts, and learn a greater variety of vocabulary and linguistic structures, applying their growing language skills in more sophisticated ways appropriate to their age and grade level o Overall Proficiency o Early Stages o Exit Stages 2) 13
  14. 14. Level 3 Description Bridging level Students continue to learn and apply a range of high‐level English language skills in a wide variety of contexts, including comprehension and production of highly technical texts. o Overall Proficiency o Early Stages o Exit Stages 3) 14
  15. 15. NOTE: there will be an English Learner, ELD Standards and Common Core module available soon 15
  16. 16. Referrals to Special Education and Assessment 16
  17. 17. Categories of EL Students Who Experience Academic Difficulties 1) Those with deficiencies in their teaching or learning environment; lack of effective ELD instruction and support 1) Those experiencing academic difficulties not related to a learning disability; interrupted schooling, limited formal education, medical problems, low attendance, high transiency, etc. 1) True ELs with disabilities and in need of Special Education 17
  18. 18. Pre Referral Steps for ELs Step 1: School Environment Determine if there is appropriate curriculum & instruction for ELs being implemented Step 2: Pre referral intervention or RtI Determine if pre referral interventions have been implemented and documented over time Step 3: Referral to Special Education Assess in native language & English and other best practices for bilingual assessment to rule out language difference versus disability 18
  19. 19. School Environment Provide ELD instruction with fidelity! 1) Continue ELD instruction until student reaches a level 4 and possibly through level 5 1) A separate, daily block of time should be devoted to ELD instruction 1) ELD should emphasize listening & speaking, and emerging research says reading & writing Saunders & Marcelleti, 2013 19
  20. 20. School Environment Cont’d. 4) ELD instruction should explicitly teach linguistic elements of English (vocabulary, syntax, grammar, functions, and conventions) 4) ELD should integrate meaning and communication via explicit, direct teaching of language (academic & conversational) 6) ELD instruction should include interactive activities among students that are carefully planned and carried out 20
  21. 21. School Environment Cont’d. 7) Provide students corrective feedback on form 7) Use of English during ELD instruction should be maximized with native language strategically incorporated 7) ELD instruction should include communication and language-learning strategies 7) ELD instruction should be planned and delivered with specific language objectives in mind Saunders & Marcelleti, 2013 21
  22. 22. Best Practices for Preventing Over Identification of ELs for SPED  Screen for reading or other academic problems and monitor progress early & provide intensive, small group reading instruction  Provide extensive & varied vocabulary instruction  Develop academic and conversational English by providing daily ELD services with fidelity  Schedule regular, peer-assisted learning opportunities Gersten, 2007 22
  23. 23. California Ed Code Requirements for Identification & Assessment of English Learners for Special Education Assessment materials and procedures used for the purposes of assessment and placement of individuals with exceptional needs are selected and administered so as not to be racially, culturally, or sexually discriminatory. Pursuant to Section 141(a) (6)(B) of Title 20 of the United State Code, the materials and procedures shall be provided in the pupil’s native language or mode of communication, unless it is clearly not feasible to do so EC 56320(a) & 56001(j) 23
  24. 24. California Ed Code Requirements for Identification & Assessment of English Learners for Special Education Cont’d. (b) Tests and other assessment materials meet all of the following requirements: Are provided and administered in the language and form most likely to yield accurate information on what the pupil knows and can do academically, developmentally, and functionally, unless it is not feasible to so provide or administered required by 1414(b)(3)(A)(ii) of Title 20 of United States Code EC 56320(b)(1) 24
  25. 25. Identification & Assessment Requirements for ELs Assessments shall be administered by qualified personnel who are competent in both the oral or sign language skills and written skills of the individual’s primary language or mode of communication and have a knowledge and understanding of the cultural and ethnic background of the pupil. If it clearly is not feasible to do so, an interpreter must be used, and the assessment report shall document this condition and note that the validity may have been affected. CCR Title 5: 3023 A variety of assessment tools and strategies will be used to gather relevant functional and developmental information, including information provided by the parent. EC 56320 25
  26. 26. Identification & Assessment Requirements for ELs It is best practice to use the following four sources of information in order to address all sociocultural factors related to ELs: 1)Norm-referenced assessments in English and native language (if native language assessments are available), to include non-verbal assessments (cross-battery preferred) 2) Criterion-referenced tests 3) Systematic observation in educational environments 4) Structured interviews (with student, parent, teachers, etc.) 26
  27. 27. Assessment of ELs Best Practices 1st Best Option – Engage in the following: 1) Administer cross cultural, non-discriminatory full or partial bilingual assessment in native language and English using bilingual assessors using evidence-based practices 2) Use of structured interviews with parents and staff 3) Engage in observation of student in varied environments 4) Collect data from curriculum based assessment measures 2nd Best Option – Engage in the following: 1) If there is no assessor available in the native language; engage in steps # 2-4 above and, 2) Using an interpreter, administer the assessment in the native language under the supervision of school licensed assessors – document limitations in assessment report 27
  28. 28. Assessment of ELs Best Practices Cont’d. 3rd Option – Engage in the following: 1) If there is no assessor available in the native language; engage in steps # 2-4 on previous slide and, 2) If there are no assessment tools available in the native language, use an interpreter who speaks the native language to provide an oral translation of assessments normed and written in English – document limitations in assessment report Worse Case Scenario Option – Engage in the following: 1) If there is no assessment tool or interpreter available in the native language engage in #2-4 on previous slide and, 2) Assess in non-verbal areas of cognition and 28
  29. 29. Assessment of ELs Why Assess in the Student’s Primary Language? It provides comparative data to the IEP team about how the student performs in the primary language versus English. The assessor can determine if similar error patterns are seen in both the primary language and English (listening, speaking, reading or writing) in order to discern if the students is having academic difficulty due to a language difference or a disability. Many students acquire BICS level English speaking skills and are stronger in English academics but think at a CALPs level in their “native language”. 29
  30. 30. Developing Linguistically Appropriate IEPS 30
  31. 31. IEP Development for ELs Also, as per EC 56345 the regulations state: “For individuals whose native language is other than English, linguistically appropriate goals, objectives, programs, and services” shall be included in the IEP contents” Note: This does not require placement in a specific classroom 31
  32. 32. IEPs for ELs Content Checklist  The results of CELDT or alternative assessment in order to document English language proficiency and develop linguistically appropriate goals  If the student requires accommodations or modifications on CELDT  How English language development (ELD) needs will be met and who will provide those services “programs, services, and instruction”  If the student needs primary language support and what language should be the language of instruction  Linguistically appropriate goals to meet English language development needs EC Section 60810; CCR Chapter 3 subchapter 1(t)(2); EC 311(c) CFR Section CFR 300.324 See J. Butterfield’s IEP Team Checklist 32
  33. 33. Documenting Programs, Services & Instruction on IEP Programs: Indicate on IEP what type of EL program the student will be in such as SEI, ELM, or alternate program (see upcoming slide for details) Services: Indicate on the IEP if the student needs primary language support or other services to be successful Instruction: Indicate where the instruction will take place (SPED classroom, general education, etc.) and if the instruction will be in English or primary language (see EC 311 part 2) 33
  34. 34. Linguistically Appropriate (ELD) Goals Linguistically appropriate goals should:  Align to the student’s present levels of performance in English (taken from CELDT or alternate assessment)  Be drafted in the student’s areas of disability Note: This may be accomplished through alignment of the student’s academic goals in ELA (listening, speaking, reading, or writing as relevant to the student’s English proficiency level (as per CELDT level) 34
  35. 35. Sample Linguistically Appropriate Goal      Domain: Strand: Sub Strand: Level: Grade: Writing Strategies & Applications Organization & Focus Intermediate 6-8 Goal: By (date) , (student) will develop a clear purpose in a short essay (two to three paragraphs) by appropriately using the rhetorical devices of quotations and facts with 90% accuracy on 3 consecutive trials as demonstrated by a written response to a prompt.
  36. 36. Best Practices for Teaching ELs with Disabilities 36
  37. 37. Need for Systematic ELD The Common Core and other content standards assume native English proficiency  Systematic ELD provides a time for  English learners to learn and practice language they need in order to navigate rigorous content instruction and a myriad of adult and peer interactions, such as discussions and collaborative work.  Systematic ELD challenges students to explore language in compelling and playful ways, continually growing their ability to use English flexibly, fluently, and accurately – to have agency over their own language use. Ultimately, the goal of Systematic ELD is for English to be a bridge to academic success rather than a barrier Susana Dutro,2013  37
  38. 38. Systematic ELD Research Critical research-based features of Systematic ELD instruction: Puts language learning and exploration …. in the foreground Groups students by assessed proficiency level as determined by multiple sources Uses a functional language approach organized around essential purposes for communication. Language tasks are highly applicable to real world and academic interactions ….. Provides an organized method of language instruction to help prevent gaps and fill existing gaps in language knowledge that can hinder students’ achievement…… Is explicitly taught, emphasizing oral language development through structured, purposeful interaction EL Achieve Susana Dutro 2013 38
  39. 39. Critical Steps to Planning Services for ELs Cont’d. What we do know: ELs learn best when learning activities that build on their home language and culture ELs need explicit instruction in “academic” as well as “conversational” English EL learning occurs best in an education context a. Rich in language input (varied vocabulary) b. With multiple forms of literacy c. With various types of organizational structures (Cooperative, Dyad, and Individual) With multiple forms of instructional strategies (Interactive, Socratic and Lecture) 39
  40. 40. Essential - Teach New Vocabulary Best practice ways to teach new academic vocabulary Teach pronunciation of words Explain vs. Define Provide Real Examples Deepen Understanding through Authentic Activities Review with Student (provide coaching) Kate Kinsella 2012 40 40
  41. 41. Programs & Services for ELs in SPED Placement Requirements for English Learners: English learners are placed in the instructional setting which can best address their individual language acquisition needs and help them learn English. 1)All pupils are placed in English-language programs unless a parental exception waiver has been granted for an alternative program. 2)Based on LEA criteria of reasonable fluency, English learners are placed in structured English immersion (SEI) or in English-language mainstream (ELM) program settings. English learners who do not meet the LEA criteria for participation in an ELM are placed in an ELM program if the parent or guardian so requests (parent may waive SEI). 41
  42. 42. SDAIE 3 Areas of Support Strategies Linguistic Support Graphic Support Kinesthetic/Vis ual Support Key vocabulary definitions Use of charts Modeling and demonstration of procedures Modify verbal input/speech (shorter phrases; slower; pauses) Use of tables Use of gestures/facial expressions Use of Repetition & rephrasing Use of graphs Use of real objects, photographs, or multimedia/videos Provide opportunities for Interaction Use of word walls Use of manipulatives Use variety of input materials (songs, poetry, etc.) Use of semantic webs Use of diagrams or models 42
  43. 43. ELD Programs & Services in California Program Delivery Programs SEI •Structured English Immersion (most intensive ELD instruction) •For students with “less than Reasonable Fluency” or scoring at beginning or early intermediate on CELDT Program Components •Intensive English Language Development (ELD) aligned to ELD goals and students’ CELDT levels •May be pull out or a group within the general education class •For students with an IEP the IEP team determines the appropriate instructional setting for the student to receive ELD as well as the staff responsible (EL or SPED). •Classroom instruction is primarily in English •Intensive ELD support is provided daily •SDAIE is provided via class •Primary language (L1) support is provided ELM •English Language Mainstream (less intensive) •For students with “Reasonable Fluency” Scoring Intermediate or above on CELDT •Less intensive English Language Development (ELD) aligned to ELD goals and students’ CELDT levels •For students with an IEP the IEP team determines the appropriate instructional setting for the student to receive ELD as well as the staff responsible (EL or SPED). •Classroom instruction is primarily in English •Daily ELD instruction is usually provided in the context of the regular classroom SDAIE is provided via class •Primary language (L1) support is provided •Alternative Programs (Bilingual Programs) •The IEP team also determines the extent to which primary language support/instruction is needed. •Classroom instruction is in primary language (L1) •Academic instruction in English (SDAIE) via class 43
  44. 44. ELD Programs & Services for ELs in SPED Ways SEI “Systematic ELD” services may be provided to ELs With IEPS:  Targeted ELD instructional groups held within the context of a classroom taught by a special educator  Instruction in a general education classroom during a portion of the day when English language development (ELD) instruction is provided by a general education teacher or staff  In a collaborative model where special educators team with the general education staff to provide EL services 44
  45. 45. The CDE Reclassification Guidelines & Reclassification of ELs in SPED 45
  46. 46. CDE Reclassification Guidelines 46
  47. 47. 1. Assessment of Language Proficiency Using an Objective Assessment Instrument CELDT is used as the primary criterion for the “objective assessment”. Students should Be considered for reclassification whose Overall proficiency level is early advanced or higher and: Listening is intermediate/higher Speaking is intermediate/higher Reading is intermediate/higher Writing is intermediate/higher 47
  48. 48. 1. Assessment of Language Proficiency Using an Objective Assessment Instrument Cont’d. Personal Communication with the CDE CELDT & SPED Division 11-30-11 The CDE’s 2012-2013 CELDT Information 48
  49. 49. 2. Teacher Evaluation Sample Criteria Used by Special and General Education Teachers:     Curriculum based measures (CBM) Progress towards IEP goals Observations with peers in class Classwork and homework samples Note: if incurred deficits in motivation and academic success *unrelated to English language proficiency do not preclude a student from Reclassification A disability may be a factor that contributes to low Academic achievement and is unrelated to “English Language proficiency” The CDE’s 2012-2013 CELDT Information 49
  50. 50. 3. Parent Opinion and Consultation Provide notice to parents or guardians of their rights and encourage them to participate in the reclassification process Provide an opportunity for a face-to-face meeting with parents or guardians Seek alternate ways to get parent input if face to face contact is not possible Seek information from parent about student performance in English at home and in community
  51. 51. 4. Performance in Basic Skills Definitions: “Performance in basic skills” means the score and/or performance level resulting from a recent administration of an objective assessment of basic skills in English, such as the California English-Language Arts Standards Test (CST for ELA) and the California Modified Assessment for ELA (CMA for ELA) “Range of Performance” means range of scores on the assessment of basic skills in English that corresponds to a performance level or a range within a performance level “Students of the same age” refers to students who are enrolled in the same grade as the student who is being considered for reclassification 51
  52. 52. 4. Comparison of Performance In Basic Skills for Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities Cont’d. - What to do in 2014-2015?? LEAs/districts may determine the assessment to be used for the “comparison of performance in basic skills” (See EC sections 56342 and 56345[b].)” 52
  53. 53. 4. Comparison of Performance In Basic Skills Cont’d. As per the CDE’s 2011-2012 CELDT Information Guide pg. 12: “For students scoring below the cut point (e.g., the CST or CMA ELA), the LEAs should attempt to determine whether factors other than English language proficiency are responsible for low performance on the test of basic skills and whether or it is reasonable to reclassify the student.” 53
  54. 54. QUESTIONS & ANSWERS 54
  55. 55. Q&A 1) May the parent opt a student out of taking CELDT? Answer: No, A parent may not opt a student out of taking CELDT. 55
  56. 56. Q&A 2) If a student is EL and in special education, are they required by law to have an ELD class? Answer: No, a student does not have to be placed in an “ ELD class”; however, the student must receive appropriate EL instruction and services. How those services will be provided should be addressed in the IEP. They may be provided in a special or regular education setting as long as they are appropriate to the student’s level of EL needs, are provided by qualified staff, and will help the student progress towards their linguistically appropriate goals and 56 objectives.
  57. 57. Q&A 3) Is reclassification to RFEP the responsibility of the IEP team for EL students in special education? Answer: Each LEA must establish policies and procedures to designate which staff or the team members are responsible for reclassification of EL students. It might very well be most appropriate for the IEP team to make reclassification decisions for ELs with disabilities as long as an professional with second language acquisition (EL) expertise participates on the IEP team. Remember: It is best practice for EL and SPED staff to work collaboratively to make reclassification decisions for students with and IEP regardless of whether or it is the IEP team or not 57
  58. 58. Q&A 4) May the IEP team designate a CELDT test variation that is not listed in the Title 5 Guidelines Section 11516 or 11516.5? Answer: Yes; however, the district must submit a request for review of the proposed variations in administering the test Title 5 Regulations Section 11510; The CDE’s 2012-2013 CELDT Information Guide 58
  59. 59. Q&A If a student participates in CELDT with test variations, accommodations, or modifications will they “pass”? 5) Answer: Yes; however, if the student takes alternate assessments for sections of the CELDT, they will get the lowest obtainable score of LOS for the sections of the test in which they took alternate assessments Title 5 Regulations Section 11510; The CDE’s 2012-2013 CELDT Information Guide 59
  60. 60. Q&A Are districts required to assess an English learner with moderate to severe disabilities in their primary language in order to qualify them for special education? 6) Answer: The regulations state you must assess in the Native Language unless it is “clearly not feasible to do so”. Based on the severity and type of disability or lack of assessment materials in the native language, it may not be feasible to assess in the native language. assessors should refer to the regulations and determine the type of assessments that are most appropriate. 60
  61. 61. Q&A 7) What is the recommended or required amount of time an English learner must receive pre referral interventions before making a referral for special education? Answer: It is best practice for English learners to Receive high quality, research-based interventions over a period oftime long enough to determine the following: a. Is the student struggling academically due to a disability or language difference? b. Can the student’s academic needs be met through general education intervention (RtI) versus special 61 education?
  62. 62. Q&A 8) May the parent waive the requirement for a Student to be assessed for special education in their primary Language? Answer: There is no specific provision for a parent to waive assessment in the primary language. A parent may decline assessment in part or in whole; however, the assessors determine the language for the assessments to be administered in. 62
  63. 63. Q&A 9) May a school EL reclassification team use “alternative criteria” to reclassify a student who is EL to RFEP? Answer: No, there is no provision that allows an LEA to use “alternative reclassification criteria”. LEAs must follow the LEA’s policies and procedures for reclassification based on the four criteria established by the State Board of Education (SBE). However, within the four established reclassification criteria the SBE have recommended flexibility in the way the way teams apply the guidelines that may be relevant to students with disabilities.
  64. 64. Q&A 10) May a school classify a student that has severe disabilities and is non-verbal as FEP upon entry? Answer: No, there is no provision that allows an LEA to use “alternative criteria” to classify a student as FEP upon entry if it is deemed the student may be an EL based on the home language survey. The LEA must attempt to give the student the CELDT (or an alternative if it is deemed the CELDT will not yield valid information). Or, if the student takes CELDT, and it is deemed the scores are invalid, the LEA may use their discretion and use other data to determine the likelihood of the student being proficient in English and designate the student accordingly. 5 CCR § 11303 Personal communication with the CDE SPED and CELDT Divn. 11-30-11 64
  65. 65. Q&A 11)May a school designate a student who uses American Sign Language (ASL) as FEP even though they are EL based on the home language survey? Answer: For purposes of taking CELDT, although ASL is considered a language separate from English, students who use ASL in and of itself, are not required to take the CELDT; however, if the HSL survey indicates that a language other than English (and ASL) is spoken in the home based on the first three questions or possibly 4th, the student should take CELDT or alternate assessment to determine proficiency in English. A student who uses ASL as their primary language in the above scenario may be identified as EL. Based on personal communication with the CDE SPED & CELDT Divn. 11-30-11; 5 CCR § 11303 65
  66. 66. Q&A 12)For the fourth reclassification criteria “comparison of performance in basic skills”, may the reclassification team use data from the CAPA assessment since the student does not take CST or CMA? Answer: Yes. The LEA may utilize to determine the student’s “comparison of performance in basic skills” at a their functional level. See The 2012-2013 CDE CELDT Information Guide pg. 20 66
  67. 67. Q&A 13) May the parent opt a student out of taking CELDT? Answer: No, A parent may not opt a student out of taking CELDT. 67
  68. 68. Q&A 14) If a student is EL and in SPED, are they required by law to have an ELD class? Answer: No, a student does not have to be placed in an “ELD class”; however, the student must receive appropriate EL instruction and services (SEI and ELM). How those services will be provided should be addressed in the IEP. They may be provided in a special or regular education setting as long as they meet the student’s level of EL needs, are provided by qualified staff, and will help the student progress towards their linguistically appropriate goals and objectives. 68
  69. 69. Q&A 15) Is reclassification to RFEP the responsibility of the IEP team for EL students in special education? Answer: Each LEA must establish policies and procedures to designate which staff or the team members are responsible for reclassification of EL students. It might very well be most appropriate for the IEP team to make reclassification decisions for ELs with disabilities as long as an professional with second language acquisition (EL) expertise participates on the IEP team. Remember: It is best practice for English learner and special education staff members to work together collaboratively to make reclassification decisions for students with disabilities regardless of whether or not the IEP team makes this decision. 69
  70. 70. Q&A 16) May the IEP team designate a CELDT test variation that is not listed in the Title 5 Guidelines Section 11516 or 11516.5? Answer: Yes; however, the district must submit a request for review of the proposed variation(s) in administering the test. Title 5 Regulations Section 11510; The CDE’s 2012-2013 CELDT Information Guide 70
  71. 71. Q&A 17) May the parent waive that the student to be assessed to determine eligibility for special education in their “native” Language? Answer: There is no specific provision for a parent to waive assessment in the primary language. A parent may decline assessment in part or in whole; however, the assessors determine the language for the assessments to be administered in. 71
  72. 72. Q&A 18) May a school EL reclassification team use “alternative criteria” to reclassify a student who is EL to RFEP? Answer: No, there is no provision that allows an LEA to use “alternative reclassification criteria”. LEAs must follow the LEA’s policies and procedures for reclassification based on the four criteria established by the State Board of Education (SBE). However, within the four established reclassification criteria the SBE have recommended flexibility in the way the way teams apply the guidelines that may be relevant to students with disabilities.
  73. 73. Q&A May a school designate a student who uses American Sign Language (ASL) as FEP even though they are EL based on the home language survey? 19) Answer: For purposes of CELDT, although ASL is considered a 2nd language, students who use ASL in and of itself, are not required to take the CELDT; however, if the HSL survey indicates that a language other than English (and ASL) is spoken in the home based on the first three questions or possibly 4th, the student should take CELDT or alternate assessment to determine proficiency in English. A student who uses ASL as their primary language in the above scenario may be identified as EL. Based on personal communication with the CDE SPED & CELDT Divn. 11-30-11; 5 CCR § 11303 73
  74. 74. Q&A 20)For the fourth reclassification criteria“comparison of performance in basic skills”, may the reclassification team use data from the CAPA assessment if the IEP team has designated that they take CAPA? Answer: Yes. The LEA may utilize CAPA to determine the student’s “comparison of performance in basic skills” at a their functional level. The CDE CELDT Information Guide 2012-2013. 74
  75. 75. Q&A 21)Do ELs that are in post secondary programs (past age 18 have to take CELDT or the Alternative? Answer: No. Students in grades K-12 take CELDT. The IEP team would still need to write a linguistically appropriate IEP if the team believes the student is an English learner.
  76. 76. CDE Resources and Guidance 1) The CDE 2012-2013 CELDT Information Guide & 2013-2014 coming soon http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/el/resources.asp 2) 1999 ELD Standards that align to CELDT at this http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/ 3)2013 new EL Standards as per AB124 http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/el/er/eldstandards.asp 4) 2013 CDE State Board Adopted EL Materials http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/rl/im/ 76

×