Santa Barbara County SELPA’s
Steps to Improving Outcomes
for Students in Center for
Therapeutic Education (CTE)
ED Program...
Introduction: Process of Change in
CTE ED Programs Step One
Needs Assessment Conduction by SELPA:
 Students were remainin...
Introduction: Process of Change in
CTE ED Programs Step 2
Research Evidence-based Best Practices
Implemented
 Students sh...
Introduction: Process of Change in
CTE ED Programs Step 3
Consultation with Experts in the Field / Staff
Development
Year ...
Introduction: Process of Change in
CTE ED Programs Step 3 Cont’d.
Year 2:
 Diana Browning Wright and Dr. Clay Cook provid...
Acquire Implement and Maintain
Skills (AIMS) MISSION STATEMENT
Developed in collaboration with the teachers, behavior
spe...
AIMS Program Philosophy and
Anticipated Outcomes
AIMS was developed as a structured, tiered levels
system designed to mea...
AIMS Philosophy
Continued
We chose a 3-pronged system in order to align the AIMS
levels system with the theory based 3-tie...
AIMS Philosophy
Continued
AIMS was designed through careful review of the
available educational research , looking for be...
AIMS Philosophy
Continued
There is a large body of educational research to support
the use of a three-tiered framework fo...
AIMS Philosophy
Continued
AIMS adopts this three-tiered practice, with three levels
of measurable skill instruction inclu...
AIMS Philosophy
Continued
Perhaps the most guiding mission behind the AIMS levels
system is our need to provide students ...
AIMS Philosophy
Continued
With a combination of intensive mental health support in
the form of cognitive behavior therapy ...
SBC SELPA CTE ED Program
Components: Staffing Roles
District/LEA Special Education Administrator- serves as
the top level...
Staffing Roles
Continued
Special Education Credentialed Teacher- Serves as the
case manager and teacher to each student. ...
Staffing Roles
Continued
School Psychologist- Provides oversight for all mental
health services, drafts and monitors all ...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Data Tracking
Daily team meetings for a duration of 20 minutes should
be held t...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Students on Daily Level- Acquire
Depending on the classroom and need, students ...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Students on Weekly Level- Implement
Once a week students will earn access to ex...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Students on Natural Level - Maintain
Students have access to weekly and daily
p...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Bonus Points
Are not to be counted as part of the 80% of points.
Only the scale...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Student Store
Student store will be offered 2-3 times a week (or
more depending...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Movement Criteria
A student will move up to the next level after each
17/20 con...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Zero Out behaviors include but are not limited to:
Unprovoked aggression
Elop...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
Sample Student Store
A classroom with 11 intervals has a total of 99
points pos...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
When planning the “prices” for items in the
student store, it is important to i...
AIMS Points and Levels Procedural
Summary
For this example, the classroom priced highly
preferred items to cost about 3 da...
28

CTE Intensified Level 1 Supports
What all students in CTE receive:
1. Establishing Relationships with ALL Students
2. ...
CTE Intensified Level 1 Supports
Continued

29

8. Progressive response system to problem behavior
9. Effective Academic I...
30

16 Proactive Classroom Management Strategies
Relationship Strategies
1. Strategically and intentionally establishing p...
16 Proactive Classroom Management Strategies 31
Continued
Procedural Strategies
1. Organizing a productive classroom
2. Pr...
AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring
Procedures

32

The best way to conceptualize Brief Behavior Rating Scales
(BBRS) is to...
AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring
Procedures - Continued

33

As a part of our AIMS data collection process, the followin...
AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring
Procedures - Continued
Review of BBRS
Compare new rating scale from that of the previou...
AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring
Procedures - Continued
Rationale for BBRS
Can evaluate the progress of individual stude...
AIMS Treatment Integrity Data
Collection Procedures

36

In order to ensure the fidelity of adherence to best practices,
...
Need for More Restrictive
Educational Setting

37

If a student is not responding to the Center for Therapeutic
Education ...
Need for More Restrictive
Educational Setting
The referral form (available in SEIS Document Library) is
to be completed by...
Threat Assessment Protocol in
CTE ED Programs
Adapted from the Diana Browning Wright TIERS
Model
After the threat is mad...
Threat Assessment Protocol in
CTE ED Programs - Continued
Step 1:
Case manager (possibly in combination with
mental healt...
Threat Assessment Protocol in CTE ED
Programs - Continued

41

Step 2:

Must decide if threat was Transient or Substantiv...
Threat Assessment - Continued

42

Step 3 (for Transient Threats only):
A transient threat can often be resolved quickly ...
43

Threat Assessment - Continued
Step 4
The substantive threat is determined to be serious or very
serious. The distinct...
44

Threat Assessment - Continued
Step 5:
Team members (including administration, case manager,
mental health specialists...
Threat Assessment - Continued

45

Step 6:
Team members (same as Step 5)take immediate action to assure that
the threat i...
Threat Assessment - Continued
Step 7:
Team integrates findings from the safety evaluation into
a written safety plan. The...
Next steps…
Ongoing Support and Training
Diana Browning Wright - TIERS
Training for new staff
Coaching
Self-Monitorin...
Questions

48
49

Thank You!
Santa Barbara County SELPA
(805) 683-1424
selpa@sbceo.org
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Jarice butterfield

  1. 1. Santa Barbara County SELPA’s Steps to Improving Outcomes for Students in Center for Therapeutic Education (CTE) ED Programs THE AIMS LEVELS SYSTEM Dr. Jarice Butterfield, Kellie Butkiewicz, M.A. PPS, Sandy Fahey, MFT, Stacy Tolkin, M.A., LEP, PPS, and Reza Shahroozi, M.Ed., PPS
  2. 2. Introduction: Process of Change in CTE ED Programs Step One Needs Assessment Conduction by SELPA:  Students were remaining in CTE ED programs on average 6+ years  No consistent system for controlling externalizing behaviors  Therapy services 1x per week by outside agencies no contracted by SELPA  No social skills or social emotional curriculum  Students were consistently not attending – truancy issues were not being addressed  Students in some programs were in CTE year after year but only in one or two periods 2
  3. 3. Introduction: Process of Change in CTE ED Programs Step 2 Research Evidence-based Best Practices Implemented  Students should not be in restrictive settings more than one year on average before returning to LREs  Successful programs include multi-tiered levels system for addressing behavior  Students with externalizing behaviors have behavior intervention plans – FBAs as appropriate  Successful programs include social direct instruction and evidence-based social emotional curriculums  Non attendance is addressed through IEP team / behavior plan if appropriate  Successful programs gradually transition students out to least restrictive environments based on their level of functioning over time 3
  4. 4. Introduction: Process of Change in CTE ED Programs Step 3 Consultation with Experts in the Field / Staff Development Year 1:  SBCSELPA contracted with NPS’ to provide staff development in best practices  SELPA purchased materials and literature on best practices  Students with externalizing behaviors have behavior intervention plans – FBAs as appropriate  AIMS levels system was developed  Half time therapists were contracted by SELPA for all CTE programs  Day treatment programs much like private NPS’ were opened at high school level  Computer-based credit recovery and course available  State of the art technology purchased  Vans were purchased for programs 4
  5. 5. Introduction: Process of Change in CTE ED Programs Step 3 Cont’d. Year 2:  Diana Browning Wright and Dr. Clay Cook provided ongoing staff development, observations, and coaching  Community-based learning implemented such as equine therapy, etc.  TIERS program combined with AIMS levels system  Second Step and Steps to Success implemented as social skills and social emotional curriculums 5
  6. 6. Acquire Implement and Maintain Skills (AIMS) MISSION STATEMENT Developed in collaboration with the teachers, behavior specialists, and support staff in all of our 12 CTE ED programs for students identified as exhibiting Emotional Disturbance under IDEA. “We believe every child has the right to experience academic, social, and emotional success within a safe and consistent environment in order to live happy, fulfilling, and productive lives.” Core Values: Responsibility, Hope, Opportunity, Joy, Safety, Respect, Emotional Regulation. 6
  7. 7. AIMS Program Philosophy and Anticipated Outcomes AIMS was developed as a structured, tiered levels system designed to measure student progress within the most restrictive educational settings in order to approximate students more quickly to less restrictive environments. AIMS is an acronym for the 3-pronged levels system designed to teach students core emotional regulation skills necessary for least restrictive environment (LRE) settings. Acquire + Implement + Maintain Skills is the AIMS motto. 7
  8. 8. AIMS Philosophy Continued We chose a 3-pronged system in order to align the AIMS levels system with the theory based 3-tiered model in education. Our students are all at the Intensive tier within the larger tiered model, but even at Tier 3, AIMS provides us with three measurable tiers within. Level 3: Maintain Skills (measured over 20 consecutive days minimally) Level 2: Implement Skills (measured over 20 days) Level 1: Acquire Skills (measured over 20 consecutive days minimally) 8
  9. 9. AIMS Philosophy Continued AIMS was designed through careful review of the available educational research , looking for best practices in education as evidenced by student outcomes. This is the theoretical framework behind using points and levels within the CTE ED Special Education setting serving students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) After reviewing the available research, SBCSELPA adopted a consultation model to enhance AIMS, through collaboration with Diana Browning Wright and Clayton Cook (more to come in later discussion) 9
  10. 10. AIMS Philosophy Continued There is a large body of educational research to support the use of a three-tiered framework for providing instruction and intervention across educational settings. This three-tiered framework is the cornerstone of Response to Intervention (RTI/MTSS) in both academic and behavioral practices. The three tiered framework is considered best practice for providing evidence based assessment, instruction, and intervention practices. 10
  11. 11. AIMS Philosophy Continued AIMS adopts this three-tiered practice, with three levels of measurable skill instruction including student acquisition of skills, student implementation of these skills, and student maintenance of these skills in order to demonstrate mastery and readiness for generalization in LRE settings. The selection of skills taught within the AIMS levels system is based on psycho-educational research, and includes the intentional (ie curricular) and systematic instruction of crucial social skills (SS) and socialemotional skills (SEL) through evidence based and SEL curriculum. 11
  12. 12. AIMS Philosophy Continued Perhaps the most guiding mission behind the AIMS levels system is our need to provide students with the external framework necessary in order to remediate significant skill deficits, so that ultimately this external framework will lead to increases in internal skills such as locus of control and emotional regulation for these highly sensitive and emotionally dysregulated population of young people. EBD is unique within IDEA because it is “curable”. The underlying mental health conditions present in students identified as EBD are treatable. 12
  13. 13. AIMS Philosophy Continued With a combination of intensive mental health support in the form of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) therapeutic interventions, academic and developmental support in the form of evidence based curricula, and behavioral support in the form of applied behavior analysis (ABA) supported practices including FBA related behavior interventions and ongoing behavior monitoring, students in the AIMS levels system programs will learn the skills necessary to selfmonitor their own behavior, self-regulate their emotional responses to stressors, and make progress academically with the goal of transition to LRE. 13
  14. 14. SBC SELPA CTE ED Program Components: Staffing Roles District/LEA Special Education Administrator- serves as the top level administrator and regional operator of the CTE ED program, ensures all program components are in place, and provides support to site administration ongoing. District/LEA School Site Administrator- Serves as the onsite go to person in the event of a crisis or emergency; assists staff access to general supplies or equipment not funded through mental health funding, and assists with students discipline. 14
  15. 15. Staffing Roles Continued Special Education Credentialed Teacher- Serves as the case manager and teacher to each student. Sets up the IEPs and prepares the IEP paperwork. Coordinates IEP goals and monitors academic progress and IEP goal progress. Behavioral Instructional Assistants- Provides academic support, data collection, and supervision (and other duties to include behavior support as determined by case manager) to students individually and in groups under the supervision (direct or indirect) of special education teacher/case manager. 15
  16. 16. Staffing Roles Continued School Psychologist- Provides oversight for all mental health services, drafts and monitors all IEP mental health goals by collaborating with the community mental health clinician and other IEP team members, and conducts all assessment related to initial and triennial evaluations. BCBA- Provides consultation to classroom staff and parents, conducts behavioral assessments and drafts behavior intervention plans (BIPs). 16
  17. 17. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Data Tracking Daily team meetings for a duration of 20 minutes should be held to discuss points and daily events. Use of Review 360 as a data collection tool, and various self-rating scales may be used. BCBAs review data during weekly class support to help evaluate intervention effectiveness and facilitate a data driven decision making process. 17
  18. 18. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Students on Daily Level- Acquire Depending on the classroom and need, students will earn access to honors room one to five days a week. Honors room will have activities, and access to preferred items for approximately 20 minutes. Students will be given feedback daily and be permitted to a student store if they meet criteria of 80% (or 85%) depending on the class. Students will be required to “pay” for access to the “honors” activities by surrendering 80%(or 85%) their points. Any points over the minimum required points to earn access to honors activity will be banked to use in the weekly student store. A concrete example will be given under sample student store section. 18
  19. 19. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Students on Weekly Level- Implement Once a week students will earn access to extra privileges not available to those on the daily level. Examples of other weekly privileges include: Outings, special lunches, access to better student store items, subject switch. Outings are determined by the teacher with the input of students and available staff. Students on a weekly monitoring system, will no longer be given feedback on points daily. Points will be tallied up at the end of the week (e.g. Friday) to determine if they will continue to earn weekly honors activity for the following week. 19
  20. 20. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Students on Natural Level - Maintain Students have access to weekly and daily privileges, plus extra privileges not available to students on the daily or weekly level. Examples of other natural privileges include: Use of kitchen, Teacher assistant privileges In addition, point sheets removed. 20
  21. 21. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Bonus Points Are not to be counted as part of the 80% of points. Only the scaled 0-3 points are used to accumulate 80% of points to earn honors room. However, points not used to access the “honors” activities, can be used in conjunction with bonus points to purchase items from the student store. 21
  22. 22. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Student Store Student store will be offered 2-3 times a week (or more depending on classroom). Student will be able to purchase items from the student store with their bonus points. Students will not be able to earn access to student store on any day they have had zero out behaviors or did not earn 80% of points for the time since the last student store. 22
  23. 23. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Movement Criteria A student will move up to the next level after each 17/20 consecutive days of making a minimum of 80% of their points. The most current 7 days of each 20 days before moving up must have 80% or better of their daily points to be eligible to move up. Any drop back in levels is a team discussion, after a student has a zero behavior on a higher level or is unsuccessful in meeting criteria to move forward for two consecutive weeks. 23
  24. 24. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Zero Out behaviors include but are not limited to: Unprovoked aggression Elopement off campus Provoked Aggression Elopement on Campus  Sustained non-compliance (two consecutive intervals of zero points in one consistent domain) 24
  25. 25. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary Sample Student Store A classroom with 11 intervals has a total of 99 points possible for the three pillars targeted. Since students are to bank all points over 80% to use towards student store, a student that obtains 100% of their points (i.e, 99 points) for a day will earn 20 bonus points to bank. Because, 80% of 99 points is 79 points. Anything over 79 points is bankable toward the student store (20 points). 25
  26. 26. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary When planning the “prices” for items in the student store, it is important to include and account for bonus points. Hypothetically, one bonus point should be given in each interval for pro-social behaviors or meeting student objectives. For this example classroom with 11 intervals a student should be earning 11 bonus points a day. Therefore, a student that obtains 100% of their points and earns one bonus point in each 11 intervals can earn a total of 31 points a day to use (or bank) in a student store. 26
  27. 27. AIMS Points and Levels Procedural Summary For this example, the classroom priced highly preferred items to cost about 3 days of points, and always has something available for students that have just barely made their day. However, there is no specific recommendation as each classroom will need to tailor their reinforcement level to match the needs of their students. Another idea to keep in mind when setting up your student store is to use round numbers to make it easier to calculate when exchanging points for items. As well as, knowing your kids and their preferences will immensely impact how you price items. For this sample store, the students highly preferred sodas, and beef jerky, and points are rounded to the nearest 5th. 27
  28. 28. 28 CTE Intensified Level 1 Supports What all students in CTE receive: 1. Establishing Relationships with ALL Students 2. Physiology to Learn 3. Positive Behavior Supports (PBS) 4. Social skills & Social Emotional Learning Curricula 5. Proactive Classroom Management Strategies 6. Good Behavior Game (classroom management) 7. Points and Levels System 28
  29. 29. CTE Intensified Level 1 Supports Continued 29 8. Progressive response system to problem behavior 9. Effective Academic Instruction* 10.Honors Room/Outings 11.Boring Room to encourage better behavior 12.Relentless Parental Outreach and Support 13.Daily De-Briefs to facilitate teaming and consistency across staff 14.Self-Governance 29
  30. 30. 30 16 Proactive Classroom Management Strategies Relationship Strategies 1. Strategically and intentionally establishing positive relationships with all students in the class 2. 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative interactions (Magic ratio) 3. Smiling and being nice 4. Positive greetings at the door to precorrect and establish a positive climate 5. Communicating competently w/ students 30
  31. 31. 16 Proactive Classroom Management Strategies 31 Continued Procedural Strategies 1. Organizing a productive classroom 2. Providing numerous opportunities to respond 3. Classroom rules/expectations and procedures are visible and known by every student 4. Teach, model, and reinforce social-emotional skills 5. Transitions are managed well 6. Independent seatwork is managed and used when needed 7. Teacher proximity and mobility 8. Motivation system to reward desirable behavior 9. Goal setting and performance feedback 10. Visual schedule of classroom activities 11. Effective cuing systems to release and regain attention
  32. 32. AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring Procedures 32 The best way to conceptualize Brief Behavior Rating Scales (BBRS) is to think of them as CBMs for behavior.   In the appendices, you will find 5 separate Brief Behavior Rating Scales targeting the following behaviors: Inattentive Behaviors Depressive Behaviors Aggressive Behaviors Anxious Behaviors Social Skills
  33. 33. AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring Procedures - Continued 33 As a part of our AIMS data collection process, the following procedures are recommended for collecting progress data: Administration of BBRS Choose the rating scale that is most specific to the student’s area of need Administer the scale prior to the implementation of the student’s Behavior Intervention Plan to establish a baseline (pre-intervention). Subsequently administer the scale at regular intervals that are reasonable for your individual programs.
  34. 34. AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring Procedures - Continued Review of BBRS Compare new rating scale from that of the previous reporting period. Note whether the student is demonstrating improvement, regressing, or maintaining their current level of functioning. Discuss future steps with IEP team.  34
  35. 35. AIMS Targeted Progress Monitoring Procedures - Continued Rationale for BBRS Can evaluate the progress of individual students Regular data collection and review encourages team members to continually engage in a problem solving process Can better suggest causal links between changes in programming (e.g. behavior support plans, implementation of SEL and Social Skills curriculum, therapeutic techniques) and the student’s behavior Data collected across dosage conditions can assist physicians in evaluating and titrating various medications (for students currently taking prescription medication). 35
  36. 36. AIMS Treatment Integrity Data Collection Procedures 36 In order to ensure the fidelity of adherence to best practices, periodically teachers and specialists working within AIMS classrooms will evaluate the components of their programs. See Appendix for “10 Elements of ED Programming Periodic SelfReflection for Fidelity”. Teachers are asked to complete the Fidelity Check monthly, and report within their PLC groups regarding challenges and successes in implementing the AIMS points and levels system with fidelity. Additionally, specialists assigned to the program including school psychologists, mental health specialists, and behavior analysts, will also contribute to fidelity checks utilizing Review 360 forms, or the “10 Elements of ED Programming” form. Treatment integrity data collected should be used in the data driven decision making processes related to programs, and inform planning and curriculum.
  37. 37. Need for More Restrictive Educational Setting 37 If a student is not responding to the Center for Therapeutic Education (CTE) and AIMS Levels System even with the intensified Level 2 and 3 Supports over time and the Districts resources have been exhausted, the District may choose to request a Consideration for placement in a Non Public School (NPS) and Residential Treatment Center (RTC) funded by SELPA. To begin this process it is recommended that the LEA/district special education administrator contact the SELPA Director to consult about the case at the earliest sign of a potential referral for NPS RTC being requested.
  38. 38. Need for More Restrictive Educational Setting The referral form (available in SEIS Document Library) is to be completed by the District along with a signed assessment plan and all indicated documentation and sent to the SELPA Director. The SELPA Director will review the case and consult with the SELPA Mental Health Specialist. The SELPA Mental Health Specialist will then contact the LEA/District Special Education Administrator and School Psychologist to begin the joint assessment process. Within 60 days of the signed Assessment Plan, the LEA schedules an IEP meeting to review the findings and to discuss if a NPS RTC placement recommendation meets the requirements of the Local Plan in order for the placement to be funded by the SBCSELPA.
  39. 39. Threat Assessment Protocol in CTE ED Programs Adapted from the Diana Browning Wright TIERS Model After the threat is made: Staff member is made aware of the threat, threat reported to Case Manager and Site Administrator immediately. . 39
  40. 40. Threat Assessment Protocol in CTE ED Programs - Continued Step 1: Case manager (possibly in combination with mental health provider or behavior specialist), evaluates the threat using the “11 Questions” guide (attached). The principal or other site administrator also interviews the recipient of the threat and any witnesses. Note: Main focus is to understand the context in which the threat was made and what the student intended by making the threat 40
  41. 41. Threat Assessment Protocol in CTE ED Programs - Continued 41 Step 2: Must decide if threat was Transient or Substantive. This is a critical step in the process. Transient threats can be readily identified as expressions of anger or frustration (or perhaps inappropriate attempts at humor) that dissipate quickly when the student reflects on the meaning of what he or she has said. Substantive threats represent a sustained intent to harm someone beyond the immediate incident. If there is doubt whether a threat is transient or substantive, the threat is regarded as substantive. One way to identify a threat as substantive is to look for certain characteristics derived from the FBI report (O’Toole, 2000) that suggest that the threat is likely to be serious:  The threat includes plausible details, such as a specific victim, time, place, and method of assault;  The threat has been repeated over time or communicated to multiple persons;  The threat is reported as a plan, or planning has taken place;  The student has accomplices, or has attempted to recruit accomplices; hat the student intended by making the threat
  42. 42. Threat Assessment - Continued 42 Step 3 (for Transient Threats only): A transient threat can often be resolved quickly at step three without engaging the full team in a comprehensive threat assessment. The administrator may require the student to apologize or explain to those affected by threat, or take other action to make amends for the student’s behavior. The administrator may also respond with a reprimand or other disciplinary consequence if the behavior was disruptive or violated the school’s discipline code. If a transient threat was sparked by an argument or conflict, the administration can involve other team members (e.g. case manager, mental health specialists) in helping to address or resolve the problem. NOTE: If Transient threat is resolved, staff does not need to proceed with steps 4-7.
  43. 43. 43 Threat Assessment - Continued Step 4 The substantive threat is determined to be serious or very serious. The distinction between serious and very serious threats is based on the intended severity of injury. Serious Threats: A serious threat is a threat to assault, strike, or beat up someone. Go To Step 5 Very Serious Threats: A very serious threat is a threat to kill, sexually assault, or severely injure someone. A threat involving the use of a weapon is generally considered a threat to severely injure someone. Go Immediately to Step 6.
  44. 44. 44 Threat Assessment - Continued Step 5: Team members (including administration, case manager, mental health specialists, behavior specialist, etc.) take actions to protect potential victims. Protective actions depend on the circumstances of the threat, as well as how soon and where the threat might be carried out. Immediate protective actions include cautioning the student about the consequences of carrying out the threat and contacting the student’s parents.  Team must also notify the intended victim of the threat.
  45. 45. Threat Assessment - Continued 45 Step 6: Team members (same as Step 5)take immediate action to assure that the threat is not carried out. Additionally, the student may be suspended from school, as determined by designated LEA/district administrator. The team may conduct a more comprehensive safety evaluation that includes both a mental health and law enforcement component. A manifestation determination may also be conducted if the behavior results in a recommendation for expulsion or exceeds 10 days of suspension during the current school year.   Team may also consider calling SAFTY for further mental health assessment. Law enforcement may also conduct further investigations of student.
  46. 46. Threat Assessment - Continued Step 7: Team integrates findings from the safety evaluation into a written safety plan. The safety plan is designed both to protect potential victims and to address the student’s educational needs. The IEP team should meet and discuss whether the student can return to school or should be placed in an alternative setting. If the student is permitted to return to school, the plan describes the conditions that must be met and the procedures in place to monitor the student when he or she returns. 46
  47. 47. Next steps… Ongoing Support and Training Diana Browning Wright - TIERS Training for new staff Coaching Self-Monitoring SBCSELPA Staff Support Review 360 Collaboration between programs 47
  48. 48. Questions 48
  49. 49. 49 Thank You! Santa Barbara County SELPA (805) 683-1424 selpa@sbceo.org

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