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Reducing Homelessness In Your Community, Part 1

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EAH Housing discusses how to reduce homelessness in any community, and the detriments it presents to those who are suffering from homelessness. Part 1 of 2.

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Reducing Homelessness In Your Community, Part 1

  1. 1. REDUCING HOMELESSNESS IN YOUR COMMUNITY, PART 1 E A H H O U S I N G . O R G
  2. 2. IT IS A FAMILIAR NUMBER AT THIS POINT referenced in countless articles across the internet and periodicals, but unfortunately, the number has yet to decrease: More than half a million people in the United States experience homelessness on any given night. Helping one family or person at a time will not be enough to put a stop to the problem altogether.  There are four components to finding a solution to homelessness, and it’s not all cut and dry, either. Housing, services, social connectedness, and prevention all play a role, and overlap in the process.  E A H H O U S I N G . O R G
  3. 3. THERE ARE FOUR components to finding a solution to homelessness, and it’s not all cut and dry, either. Housing, services, social connectedness, and prevention all play a role, and overlap in the process. E A H H O U S I N G . O R G
  4. 4. FIRST AND FOREMOST, as mentioned, is housing. More than a quarter of the United States’ homeless population resides in California alone, almost 554,000 as of the end of 2017. Many of these people are members of your community — senior citizens, in particular, are a rising demographic because of the exponential cost of housing. Ordinary people from all walks of life find themselves homeless and needing affordable shelter, for a myriad of reasons. E A H H O U S I N G . O R G
  5. 5. LONG-TERM resident stability is essential to ending homelessness. Shelters are not a long-term answer. They often cannot be used as a permanent address, and many shelters don’t allow outside belongings, which adds to the sense of overall instability. A shelter may be a brief, but welcome reprieve from the elements, but it isn’t a permanent home to the people staying there. E A H H O U S I N G . O R G
  6. 6. A PERMANENT RESIDENCE leads to a more stable life, and a more stable life reduces things such as emergency care visits or repeat hospitalizations for those who need regimens for chronic illness medications, those struggling with substance abuse or anxiety, or even those fighting preventable diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure. E A H H O U S I N G . O R G
  7. 7. STAY TUNED FOR PART 2 For more information on affordable housing, visit EAH Housing's website at EAHHousing.org E A H H O U S I N G . O R G

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