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VM for Global Citizenship

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VM for Global Citizenship by Herco Fonteijn, Maastricht University

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VM for Global Citizenship

  1. 1. VM for GCEd Herco Fonteijn Maastricht University, The Netherlands EADTU PLA-VM, 12 december 2018
  2. 2. Global citizenship (Morais&Ogden,2011)
  3. 3. Collaboration in culturally diverse groups (Stahl et al., 2010; Cheng&Leung,2012) • process losses - task conflict - decreased social integration • process gains - increased creativity - Increased satisfaction • moderators include team size, tenure, dispersion, channel, task complexity, perceived cultural distance
  4. 4. Infuse cultural diversity http://geert-hofstede.com
  5. 5. VM for employability
  6. 6. VM for humanitarians - Assignment Prepare PBL materials and research/ intervention proposal on humanitarian work psychology in Indonesia Topics • Poverty reduction • Social entrepreneurship • Capacity building • Displacement/refugees • Disaster management • Fair pay • Child labor • Coping with stress in humanitarian work • Corruption • Gender mainstreaming • …
  7. 7. Launch https://usergeneratededucation.wordp ress.com/tag/passion-based- learning/page/2/ • 80-90 MSc students / year • Maastricht University plus partner (here: UNPAD - Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung) • Joint online introduction • Virtual ice breaker • Virtual team meetings • Teams discuss sketchy guidelines (intentional uncertainty infusion) • Complete team charter The thing I do best: Driving a car Best learning experience ever: - Short internship in mental health institution - Training with poor children Most fun thing I’ve ever done: Holiday with my friends (Bali and Singapore) One thing I wonder about: What Americans, Europeans, and Asians think about marriage?
  8. 8. Self-directed learning No tools pushed
  9. 9. Assessment 1: Monitor and reflect on progress
  10. 10. Assessment 2: Problem construction PBL problem description Tutor guide 1 Diplomacy and negotiating conflicts in humanitarian work 2 Disaster management and response 3 Poverty reduction 4 Ethical decision making in humanitarian work 5 Developing leaders in humanitarian organizations 6 Coping with stress in humanitarian work 7 Microfinance and supporting people to start businesses 8 Capacity building and training implementation 9 Displacement/refugees/homelessness 10 Human trafficking and slavery 11 Child labour 12 Fair pay (inequity) 13 Gender mainstreaming 14 How to make aid more effective 15 Corruption 16 Social entrepreneurship
  11. 11. Assessment 3: Research/intervention proposal
  12. 12. BinHere ….. Localize Capture Karma: 56 Get more point Trashbin Recycle Station Trash dump Navigate to closest:
  13. 13. Karma: 56 Get more point Available Discounts Checked/Reported Dharma Level 2: Baby Activist Friends Rank Checked/Reported Checked/Reported Photos Shared # 8 (x2) 16p 2 (x3) 6p 4 (x1) 4p Darma Level 2 Ari Level 4 Sarah Level 3 Annisa Level 2 Ryan Level 1 Quiz 5 (x5) 25p 5 p 56/60 4 Karma points to level up! Localize Capture Karma: 56 Get more point Localize Capture Karma: 56 Get more point Generate QR Trashbin Recycle Station Trash dump Report New Add Photo
  14. 14. Assessment 4: Pitch
  15. 15. • 2016: Corruption - Qualitative research on elementary school teacher’s preparedness to teach anti-corruption programmes • 2017: Child labor - Intervention program: design and implement 2 day workshop on child mental health of for social workers • 2018: Social entrepreneurship - BinHere Follow-up: undergraduate research @ UNPAD
  16. 16. Evaluation
  17. 17. Virtual collaborative problem solving Ambiguity management • “The ambiguous project description was a challenge. Initially I was a little bit irritated, because I did not know how to start. Then I realized that this was part of the project and we as a group were meant to interpret the project ourselves by discussing about it and brainstorming. I learned to be more self- confident and to have trust in the group to come up with a joint interpretation.” (M56)
  18. 18. Perspective taking • “It made me realize that I have to reflect on my own behavior much more than I currently do (e.g. the Western European (female) directness might irritate people with a different cultural background).” (M46, German).” • “I heard a lot of other groups complain that their Indonesian team had trouble understanding but I think they were not patient enough and clear enough on what they wanted from them (..) This was a very new experience for me. (..) I got to know how Westerners feel and think when it comes to Eastern context.” (M64, from India) Virtual collaborative problem solving
  19. 19. Communication • “I think why we or I have not insisted that we need the information earlier or from a different quality was the fear to seem unfriendly or fulfill a certain stereotype by pushing them” (M72) Virtual collaborative problem solving
  20. 20. Experiential e-learning “Being in the project made the articles for this course come to life. A lot of times I could relate to what a text would say, because a similar situation happened in our team.” (M40) Virtual collaborative problem solving
  21. 21. Identity building/ employability • “Being part of a project like this makes me more aware of all the possibilities to work as a psychologist, especially in my case who changed from a marketing background because I was missing the purpose and the positive social impact that my job could have in other people’s lives.”(M17) Virtual collaborative problem solving
  22. 22. % UM students reporting that assignment impacted evaluation of.. 0 50 100 I enjoy interacting with persons from cultures different from my own I am willing to defend my own views when they differ from others I see myself as a global citizen I consider different cultural perspectives when evaluating global problems I welcome working with people whose cultural values differ from mine I am accepting of people with different religious and spiritual traditions It is OK if some people in the world have more opportunities than others (selected items from CPI, GCI; light blue: 2017 N=30; blue 2016, N=38; dark blue 2015, N=40); response rates 0.5-0.65
  23. 23. Recruitment Preparation: Role-Playing First Plenary meeting (Skype) Follow up meetings Final Presentation VM Processes at UNPAD
  24. 24. Indonesian perspectives 1 Radical reciprocity • New network: academic and social • Knowledge and understanding about other cultures  • Exchange knowledge on psychology curriculum and prospective career • Exchange information about the current issues on psychology field • English proficiency  • ICT ability  • Self-confidence  • Self-management  • Leadership 
  25. 25. • “I learned about humanitarian work which is one of most important topics to discuss, while in Indonesia we seldom talk about it” (P14) • “I learned about the work style of students from Maastricht as a team and tried to adjust to it with our own style.”(P25) • “It really helped me to see problems from another (cultural) perspective. The project also helped me to improve my English conversation, something that I rarely practice. It also nice to have a friend from another country.” (P9) • “I learned how to communicate, negotiate and also persuade other people who have different culture from me. What a priceless experience for me!” (P5) Indonesian student comments
  26. 26. Other lessons learned • Embrace differences - Culture, digital literacy, language, academic climate • Student-centered learning • Interdependence • Reflection on digital footprint • Complex authentic problem finding • Adapt
  27. 27. Scaling up: Cognition & Culture (450 students/yr) • 450 bachelor students /yr • 1ECTS assignment embedded in cognitive psychology modules at UNPAD and UM
  28. 28. Buchteletal.,JPSP,2015
  29. 29. Improvements suggested by bachelor students (%) 0 20 40 60 smaller groups provide more specific guidelines give more ICT support move assignment to period with lighter workload spend more time on assignment (longer duration) (bachelor students 2017, N=199; response rate 0.6)
  30. 30. % UM students reporting that assignment impacted evaluation of.. 0 50 100 I enjoy interacting with persons from cultures different from my own I am willing to defend my own views when they differ from others I see myself as a global citizen I consider different cultural perspectives when evaluating global problems I welcome working with people whose cultural values differ from mine I am accepting of people with different religious and spiritual traditions (selected items from CPI, GCI; light blue: 2017 N=30; blue 2016, N=38; dark blue 2015, N=40; red: bachelors 2017, N=199); response rates 0.5-0.65
  31. 31. Groups vary
  32. 32. • Great enthousiasm for connecting with international students • German and Dutch students were friendly • Time difference (5 hrs) is difficult to handle • Majority of groups in both (!) countries complain about long response times • Indonesian students assumed radio silence occurred because they had not been clear enough or did not understand what was required, blaming themselves • German/Dutch students put blame on a lack of clear instructions for students in Bandung • More structure and deadlines would help (very young students in different academic climate) • Next: crossing disciplinary boundaries (Business, PoliSci students), online undergraduate research Lessons learned: Indonesian perspectives 2
  33. 33. Thanks for your attention! Questions? h.fonteijn@maastrichtuniversity.nl

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