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A PEDAGOGICAL MODEL FOR
SCIENCE EDUCATION THROUGH
BLENDED LEARNING
1
José Bidarra (Universidade Aberta, jose.bidarra@uab.p...
2
⇒  Changing labour market
⇒  High turnover rate of knowledge
⇒  New practices of technology use in daily life
⇒  Student...
3
⇒  Few students follow a career in sciences (mainly girls)
⇒  The educational system does not motivate students
⇒  scien...
Free resources are available
For the first time in history we have resources and
educational technologies that cost nothing...
Blended learning framework
•  Context: establish learning processes regarded not as
isolated variables within controlled s...
6
7
8
CONTENT GAMIFICATION, DIGITAL
NARRATIVES, AND TRANSMEDIA
STORYTELLING
9
GAMIFICATION
DIGITAL NARRATIVES
TRANSMEDIA
STORYTE...
10
⇒  How to make content more engaging in online courses,
MOOCs, SPOCs, and other formats?
⇒  Many distance learning cour...
One size fits all...
José
Bidarr
a,
2015
Gamification
•  "the use of game design elements in non-
game contexts" (Deterding et al., 2011, p.1)
•  A common implement...
Game Mechanics, Dynamics and
Emotions (MDE Model)
Badges Avatars
Votes
Leaderboards
Achievements
Boss Fights
Virtual Goods...
Digital storytelling
•  Storytelling is based on
a set of four elements
that are still valid in the
digital age:
–  A narr...
Acquiring XXI Century Skills
•  Creativity– the ability to develop from scratch new solutions
to emerging problems (commun...
16
•  Right motivational context
•  Adequate technology mix
•  Learner centered approach
•  Engaging learning activities
•...
Thank you for your attention!
José	
  Bidarra	
  (DCeT,	
  Universidade	
  Aberta,	
  jose.bidarra@uab.pt)	
  
Ellen	
  Ru...
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A pedagogical model for science education through blended learning

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José Bidarra (UAb) and Ellen Rusman (OUNL) presented A pedagogical model for science education through blended learning as part of the online events by expert pool Institutional Support within EMPOWER.

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A pedagogical model for science education through blended learning

  1. 1. A PEDAGOGICAL MODEL FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION THROUGH BLENDED LEARNING 1 José Bidarra (Universidade Aberta, jose.bidarra@uab.pt) Ellen Rusman (Open Universiteit, ellen.rusman@ou.nl) CLASSROOM ONLINE MOBILE IMMERSIVE
  2. 2. 2 ⇒  Changing labour market ⇒  High turnover rate of knowledge ⇒  New practices of technology use in daily life ⇒  Students will work in jobs “not-yet-invented” ⇒  Adaptation to a global and connected world WHY ANOTHER MODEL? COMPLEX DEVELOPMENTS IN SOCIETY
  3. 3. 3 ⇒  Few students follow a career in sciences (mainly girls) ⇒  The educational system does not motivate students ⇒  science studies (STEM) perceived as more "difficult" than other fields ⇒  highly theoretical orientation, not related to the daily problems of students ⇒  negative ‘image’ of STEM among younger students (nerdy, weird, abstract, complex…) ⇒  Europe needs to integrate migrants and refugees in science careers, as more professionals are needed THE PROBLEM SCIENCE EDUCATION
  4. 4. Free resources are available For the first time in history we have resources and educational technologies that cost nothing to governments and schools: –  Smart mobile phones (most students have one); –  Networking software (freely available, e.g. Hangouts, Messenger, Skype); –  Learning applications (freely and increasingly available, e.g. Apple Store, Google Play); –  Open educational resources (in growing supply, e.g. MOOCs, iTunes U, Khan Academy). 4
  5. 5. Blended learning framework •  Context: establish learning processes regarded not as isolated variables within controlled settings, but as components to be understood in more realistic, authentic situations (closer to work and life environment). •  Technology: enable learners to create portfolios and digital artefacts, affording a more ‘seamless’ learning experience, using software that combines a variety of multimedia tools including text, still images, audio, video and Web publishing. •  Pedagogy: develop strategies that are flexible in terms of location, time and pace, and valuable and feasible to the learner, according to his/her learning style, personal needs and learning context(s). 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. CONTENT GAMIFICATION, DIGITAL NARRATIVES, AND TRANSMEDIA STORYTELLING 9 GAMIFICATION DIGITAL NARRATIVES TRANSMEDIA STORYTELLING
  10. 10. 10 ⇒  How to make content more engaging in online courses, MOOCs, SPOCs, and other formats? ⇒  Many distance learning courses do not motivate students and institutions do not have solutions ⇒  Europe needs to integrate migrants and refugees and involve them in the right educational context THE PROBLEM
  11. 11. One size fits all... José Bidarr a, 2015
  12. 12. Gamification •  "the use of game design elements in non- game contexts" (Deterding et al., 2011, p.1) •  A common implementation of gamification is to take the scoring elements of video games, such as points, levels, and achievements, and apply them to a work or educational context. 12
  13. 13. Game Mechanics, Dynamics and Emotions (MDE Model) Badges Avatars Votes Leaderboards Achievements Boss Fights Virtual GoodsGuilds Quests Rewards Progress Bars Skill Trees Experience Points Stat Points
  14. 14. Digital storytelling •  Storytelling is based on a set of four elements that are still valid in the digital age: –  A narrator –  A plot –  A setting –  Characters •  There is usually a conflict of some kind, for example: –  Conflict between one person and another or between groups; –  Conflict between a person and the natural environment; –  Conflict between an individual and the society. 14
  15. 15. Acquiring XXI Century Skills •  Creativity– the ability to develop from scratch new solutions to emerging problems (communication, digital literacy); •  Critical thinking- the capacity to read, interpret, and evaluate new information (citizenship, communication, digital literacy; •  Problem solving- the ability to make decisions and implement the best solutions (communication, collaboration, digital literacy); •  Productivity- the ability to be more productive and apply higher level skills (ICT competences are important). (Voogt  &  Roblin,  2012)   15
  16. 16. 16 •  Right motivational context •  Adequate technology mix •  Learner centered approach •  Engaging learning activities •  Effective guidance & support •  Quality assessment IN CONCLUSION SOME KEY ASPECTS:
  17. 17. Thank you for your attention! José  Bidarra  (DCeT,  Universidade  Aberta,  jose.bidarra@uab.pt)   Ellen  Rusman  (Welten  InsDtute,  Open  Universiteit,  ellen.rusman@ou.nl)   17

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