Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

Standing up for those who served Slide 1 Standing up for those who served Slide 2 Standing up for those who served Slide 3 Standing up for those who served Slide 4 Standing up for those who served Slide 5 Standing up for those who served Slide 6 Standing up for those who served Slide 7 Standing up for those who served Slide 8 Standing up for those who served Slide 9 Standing up for those who served Slide 10 Standing up for those who served Slide 11 Standing up for those who served Slide 12 Standing up for those who served Slide 13 Standing up for those who served Slide 14 Standing up for those who served Slide 15 Standing up for those who served Slide 16 Standing up for those who served Slide 17 Standing up for those who served Slide 18 Standing up for those who served Slide 19 Standing up for those who served Slide 20 Standing up for those who served Slide 21 Standing up for those who served Slide 22 Standing up for those who served Slide 23
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

0 Likes

Share

Download to read offline

Standing up for those who served

Download to read offline

Presented at the 2019 Colorado Counseling Association, Veterans and clinical mental health professional Duane France discusses the need for clinical mental health counselors to participate in advocacy on behalf of military affiliated clients, the community, and the profession

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Standing up for those who served

  1. 1. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 Standing Up for Those Who Served: Professional Counselors, Advocacy, and Veteran Mental Health Duane K. L. France, MA, MBA, LPC duane@veteranmentalhealth.com
  2. 2. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 • Licensed professional counselor • 2015 NBCC foundation military scholar • 2016 NBCC foundation capacity building grant • Co 4th judicial district veteran trauma court • Active in legislation and advocacy • Co-Chair, American counseling association public policy & legislation committee • Writing to inform veterans, their families, and communities about veteran mental health • Director of Veteran Services for the Family Care Center, LLC. • Executive director of the Colorado Veterans Health and Wellness agency Introduction
  3. 3. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 • Retired in 2014 after 22 years of service in the United States Army • Operation Iraqi freedom Oct ‘06-Dec ‘07 • Operation Enduring Freedom ‘09-’10 • Operation enduring freedom ’11-’12 • Flintlock ‘13, Mauritania • Operation Joint Endeavor, ‘95-’96 • Transportation and logistics Introduction
  4. 4. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 In 2016, the Military and Government Counseling Association appointed a task force to develop a set of competencies for professional counselors when working with service members, veterans and their families. The appointed task force developed and presented Competencies for Counseling Military Populations (Prosek, et al., 2018). Proposed Competencies for Counseling Military Populations
  5. 5. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Advocacy represents counselors’ ability to understand and influence individual, system, and public policy efforts to increase access to mental health resources for military-connected clients and promote the role of counseling professionals working with military populations. Proposed Competencies for Counseling Military Populations Military Culture represents general information about the functioning and worldview of military service members and their families. Ethics represents counselors’ self-awareness and motivation to serve military-connected clients, as well as ethical considerations working with military populations. Systems Features represents general information about the nature and structure of the military lifecycle including, but not limited to, deployment, family, spouses and children, health and wellness, employment, and retirement. Assessment of Presenting Concerns represents common areas of clinical concerns that service members frequently present to mental health services to address. Identity Development represents the whole person concept of military life including one’s personal identity as a service member and connection to mission and core values of working in a high-risk occupation across the lifespan. Treatment represents general information about unique issues that may arise in the treatment of military-affiliated clients and approaches supported by research for military populations, including best practices of military care systems, as well as holistic, wellness-oriented services.
  6. 6. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Advocacy represents counselors’ ability to understand and influence individual, system, and public policy efforts to increase access to mental health resources for military-connected clients and promote the role of counseling professionals working with military populations. Proposed Competencies for Counseling Military Populations (Advocacy) • Advocates for strength-based, wellness approaches when counseling military- connected clients. • Advocates for the development and accessibility of mental health care for military populations, with specific attention to family members, such as children. • Forms collaborations among agencies serving military-connected clients. • Compiles reputable non-VA resources to provide military-connected clients. • Understands the complexity associated with VA Benefits programs and advocates with clients to receive the assistance to which they are entitled, as appropriate. • Supports initiatives for trainings to decrease stigma associated with mental health within military populations. • Supports initiatives for diversity trainings to generate positive cultural change, including the decrease of cultural stigmas of diverse individuals within military populations. • Considers training opportunities to increase counselor competence among trainees and professionals working with military-connected clients. • Supports prevention programs that connect military family members to the community. • Advocates to change laws that conflict with counselors’ ethical codes. • Advocates to maintain the inclusion of counselors as mental health providers for military populations. • Actively assists Active Duty, Reserve Components, Veterans, retired military members, and military families in self-advocacy strategies.
  7. 7. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019Learning Objectives At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: • Attendees will be able to identify the need to improve connectedness by compiling Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA resources for SMVF clients and forming collaborative cooperation among agencies serving military-connected clients. • Attendees will be able to identify why it is necessary to advocate for a strengths-based, wellness approach, actively assist SMVF clients in developing self-advocacy strategies, and understand the complex VA system in order to assist clients in navigating the process. • Attendees will be able to recognize the role of the professional counselor in supporting or providing training to reduce stigma associated with mental health in the SMVF population, recognize the need for training to generate positive cultural change, and consider and provide training to increase counselor competence when working with the SMVF population. • Attendees will be able to comprehend the need for and ability of Professional Counselors to influence policy and legislative efforts through advocating for increased access to and availability of care for the SMVF population, by advocating to change laws that conflict with our ethical codes, and advocating for the increased inclusion of Professional Counselors for military populations. 7 7
  8. 8. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Improve Connectedness: Compile Resources for SMVF Clients VA Resources Non-VA Resources
  9. 9. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 Improve Connectedness: Form Collaborative Cooperation
  10. 10. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Promote Wellness: Advocate for a Strengths-Based Wellness Approach A way of life oriented toward optimal health and well-being in which body, mind and spirit are integrated by the individual to live life more fully within the human and natural community. Ideally it is the optimum state of health and wellbeing that each individual is capable of achieving. Marine Staff Sgt. Daniel Kachmar lost two fingers and had other serious wounds from his service in Iraq. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III. Treating Mental Illness Building Mental Wellness
  11. 11. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Promote Wellness: Assist Clients to Develop Self-Advocacy Strategies Self-advocacy has been defined as the ability to communicate one’s needs and make informed decisions about the supports necessary to meet those needs (Kinny & Eakman, 2017)
  12. 12. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 Change Culture: Reduce Stigma in the SMVF Population Mental health stigma is a dynamic process by which a service member or veteran perceives or internalizes a brand or marked identity about himself or herself or people with mental health disorders (Acosta et al., 2014) Reduce stigmatizing isolation Change stigmatizing cultural norms Increase Peer Support Increase Perceptions of Effectiveness of Care Reduce Barriers To Care
  13. 13. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Culture: Generate Positive Cultural Change Supports initiatives for diversity trainings to generate positive cultural change, including the decrease of cultural stigmas of diverse individuals within military populations. Female Service Members / Veterans Racial / Ethnic Minorities LGBTQ+ Service Members / Veterans Religious Minorities
  14. 14. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Culture: Increase Counselor Competence A large number of predoctoral interns are introduced to the veteran population for the first time during their internship training year. Therefore, a need exists within the psychological training and supervision literature for materials that outline how to work effectively with veterans (Strom et al, 2012).
  15. 15. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 www.ballotpedia.org Change Framework: Influence Policy and Legislation
  16. 16. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Framework: Influence Policy and Legislation Collaborate with policymakers to impact positive change for service members, veterans, and their families Connect with local lawmakers in order to advise and support legislative change Seek out opportunities to get involved in national conversations around SMVF Mental Health Participate in State and National Legislative Events
  17. 17. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Framework: Change Laws in Conflict with Ethical Codes I.1.c. Conflicts Between Ethics and Laws If ethical responsibilities conflict with the law, regulations, and/or other governing legal authority, counselors make known their commitment to the ACA Code of Ethics and take steps to resolve the conflict. If the conflict cannot be resolved using this approach, counselors, acting in the best interest of the client, may adhere to the requirements of the law, regulations, and/or other governing legal authority. …Circumstances may arise in which a law (broadly defined to include state and federal laws and regulations, binding case law, administrative rules, or court orders) may require [clinicians] to do something that could harm patients, limit patient autonomy, and/or otherwise offend the personal and professional ethical values of most psychologists (Knapp, Gottlieb, Berman, & Handlesman, 2007) Military mental health providers may find ethical–legal conflicts in areas as wide ranging as confidentiality, multiple relationships, informed consent, participating in detainee interrogation, and responding to client admission of non- heterosexual orientation (Johnson, Grasso, & Maslowski, 2010) .
  18. 18. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Framework: Increase Professional Counselors in Military Serving Populations
  19. 19. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Framework: Increase Professional Counselors in Military Serving Populations
  20. 20. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 Change Framework: Increase Professional Counselors in Military Serving Populations
  21. 21. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 References Acosta, J. D., Becker, A., Cerully, J. L., Fisher, M. P., Martin, L. T., Vardavas, R., ... & Schell, T. L. (2014). Mental health stigma in the military. RAND NATIONAL DEFENSE RESEARCH INST SANTA MONICA CA. Johnson, W. B., Grasso, I., & Maslowski, K. (2010). Conflicts between ethics and law for military mental health providers. Military Medicine, 175(8), 548-553. Kinney, A. R., & Eakman, A. M. (2017). Measuring Self-Advocacy Skills among Student Veterans with Disabilities: Implications for Success in Postsecondary Education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 30(4), 343-358. Knapp, S., Gottlieb, M., Berman, J., & Handelsman, M. M. (2007). When laws and ethics collide: What should psychologists do?. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38(1), 54. Myers, J. E., Sweeney, T. J., & Witmer, J. M. (2000). The wheel of wellness counseling for wellness: A holistic model for treatment planning. Journal of Counseling & Development, 78(3), 251-266. Pollack, S., (2019, July) Examination of VA Licensed Professional Mental Health Counselors (LPMHCs) Training Programs and Opportunities for Employment. Presented at the American Counseling Association Institute for Leadership Training (ILT), Washington D.C. Prosek, E., Burgin, E., Atkins, K., Wehrman, J., Fenell, D., Carter, C., & Green, L. (2018). Competenceis for Counseling Miltiary Populations. Journal of Military and Government Counseling, 87-99. Strom, T. Q., Gavian, M. E., Possis, E., Loughlin, J., Bui, T., Linardatos, E., ... & Siegel, W. (2012). Cultural and ethical considerations when working with military personnel and veterans: A primer for VA training programs. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 6(2), 67.
  22. 22. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 $25 Per Webinar to Register www.veteranmentalhealth.com/naadac
  23. 23. BEYOND BASIC TRAINING ACA 2019 www.veteran mentalhealth.com/CCA2019 @ThCounselingVet www.linkedin.com/in/dklfrance @veteranmentalhealth www.veteranmentalhealth.com duane@veteranmentalhealth.com 719-540-2136 Questions / Comments / Contact

Presented at the 2019 Colorado Counseling Association, Veterans and clinical mental health professional Duane France discusses the need for clinical mental health counselors to participate in advocacy on behalf of military affiliated clients, the community, and the profession

Views

Total views

534

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

45

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×