Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

Below The Surface of the Veteran Mental Health Iceberg Slide 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Exhaustion of ip rights
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

0 Likes

Share

Download to read offline

Below The Surface of the Veteran Mental Health Iceberg

Download to read offline

An infographic that takes a look at aspects of #VeteranMentalHealth that go beyond #PTSD and #TBI. Moral Injury, Meaning and Purpose, Learned Helplessness, and Needs Fulfillment are all discussed.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Below The Surface of the Veteran Mental Health Iceberg

  1. 1. BELOW THE SURFACE OF THE VETERAN MENTAL HEALTH ICEBERG To locate a clinical mental health professional with experience in the unique needs of military service members, veterans, and their families, go to the Head Space and Timing blog at www.veteranmentalhealth.com IT DOESN’T HAVE TO STAY THIS WAY. WORKING WITH A MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL CAN HELP VETERANS RESOLVE THESE CONCERNS. Thanks to greater awareness about Veteran Mental Health, many in a veteran’s community are aware of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury, the most commonly know mental health challenges that veterans face Moral Injury is a description about how a veteran’s core beliefs about what is right and wrong with the world has been changed by their military experiences However, there are other post-military challenges that veterans experience that go beyond PTSD and TBI Many veterans experience a lack of purpose and meaning in their post-military lives, compared to the meaningfulness of their service Learned Helplessness is the belief that a veteran cannot change the course of negative events, that failure is inevitable and there is no sense in even trying After leaving the service, veterans have to learn new ways to meet needs that were previously satisfied by service, camaraderie, and self-actualization in the military The length and limit of a veteran’s feelings of helplessness is predicted by how permanently, pervasively, and personally they explain the situation to themselves (Abramson et al. 1978) Abramson, L. Y., Seligman, M. E. P., & Teasdale, J. D. (1978). Learned helplessness in humans: Critique and reformulation. Journal of Abnor- mal Psychology, 87, 49 –74. Litz, B. T., Stein, N., Delaney, E., Lebowitz, L., Nash, W. P., Silva, C., & Maguen, S. (2009). Moral injury and moral repair in war veterans: A preliminary model and intervention strategy. Clinical psychology review, 29(8), 695-706. Southwick, S. M., Gilmartin, R., Mcdonough, P., & Morrissey, P. (2006). Logotherapy as an adjunctive treatment for chronic combat-related PTSD: A meaning-based intervention. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 60(2), 161. Moral Injury can be defined as “Perpetrating, failing to prevent, bearing witness to, or learning about acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations.” (Litz, et al., 2009) PTSD TBI Many veterans with PTSD live with profound doubts about the meaning of a life dominated by suffering, guilt and death. This loss of meaning and purpose has pronounced effects on all areas of psychosocial functioning. (Southwick, et al., 2009) Once a veteran has obtained a sense of achievement and mastery in the military, they then have to pivot to developing mastery in an entirely different arena.

An infographic that takes a look at aspects of #VeteranMentalHealth that go beyond #PTSD and #TBI. Moral Injury, Meaning and Purpose, Learned Helplessness, and Needs Fulfillment are all discussed.

Views

Total views

157

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

3

Actions

Downloads

3

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×