Isokenetic testing in sports

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Isokinetic Testing in Sports

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Isokenetic testing in sports

  1. 1. Isokinetic testing in Sports Dr. Rajal Sukhiyaji
  2. 2.  Introduction  Concept of isokinetics  What is isokinetics?  OKC and CKC  Purposes of isokinetic testing  Protocol of isokinetic testing  Isokinetic data and analysis  Advantages  Limitation  Contraindication
  3. 3.  “James Perrine” first introduced the concept of Isokinetic exercise to the physical therapy profession in the late 1960’s.  Isokinetic means constant speed: “Iso” means constant and “kinetic” means movement.
  4. 4. Concept of isokinetics  Traditional weight lifting exercises - variable speeds at a fixed resistance or weight.  Isokinetic exercises - at a dynamic preset fixed speed with resistance that is accommodating throughout the range of motion.
  5. 5. What is Isokinetics??  Fixed velocity – Ranging from 1 degree per second to approximately 1000 degree per second.  Accommodating resistance  Isokinetic dynamometers - used are Biodex, Humac, Cybex, Kin-Com, Lido
  6. 6. OKC & CKC  OKC - Open kinetic chain exercise in which the distal component of the limb is not fixed or weight bearing but free in space.  CKC - Closed kinetic chain exercise in which distal fixed end of the limb may be either stationary or moveable
  7. 7. Rationale for incorporating OKC into assessment and rehabilitation  Isolated testing of specific muscle group  Muscle groups away from specific site of injury must be assessed  CKC – not demonstrate true weakness  Provide clinical control  Normalize the motor control pattern  Efficacy of rehabilitation
  8. 8.  Objectively assess muscular performance.  The Isokinetic device is attached to a computer, that assesses the torque output of the muscles being testing.
  9. 9.  Isokinetic testing allows for a variety of testing protocols ranging from strength, strength ratios between two muscle groups, power, and endurance.  Primary recommendation – perform velocity spectrum testing
  10. 10.  To obtain objective records  To screen athletes  To establish a database  To quantify objective information  To obtain objective serial reassessment  To develop normative data  To correlate isokinetic torque curves with pathologic condition  To use the shape of the curve to individualize the rehabilitation program.
  11. 11.  Educate the athlete  Testing uninvolved side first  Providing appropriate warm ups at each speed  Verbal commands  Use standardized protocol  Calibrated equipment  Proper stabilization
  12. 12. Isokinetic data and analysis  Peak torque  Angular position  Acceleration  Deceleration  Load rang  Torque – velocity relationship  Average power  Shape of the torque curves
  13. 13. Criteria for interpreting isokinetic tests results  Bilateral comparison  Unilateral ratios  Torque to body weight relationship  Comparison to normative data
  14. 14.  Efficiency  Safety  Accommodating resistance  Decreased joint compressive forces at higher speeds  Physiologic overflow through the velocity spectrum  Velocity spectrum training  Minimal postexercise soreness with concentric isokinetic contraction  Computer feedback provided
  15. 15.  Large and expensive  Set up time and assistance required  Isolated joint/muscle testing  Non functional pattern of movement  Increased compressive forces at slower speeds
  16. 16. Contraindication  Soft tissue healing constraints  Pain  Limited ROM  Effusion  Joint instability  Acute strains and sprains
  17. 17.  Physical rehabilitation of the injured athlete, third edition, James R. Andrews, M.D., et al.  Isokinetic Dynamometry Applications and Limitations, V. Baltzopoulos and D.A . Brodie  Isokinetics in Human Performance, By Lee E. Brown  Isokinetic Exercise, By Robert Donatelli, PhD, PT, Sportsmd health and performance

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