10 Foods That Drive Weight Gain and Loss Identified by Harvard             Study
Long-term impacts of small but significant    lifestyle changes—especially to dietThe New England Journal of Medicine, a t...
Long-term impacts of small but significantlifestyle changes—especially to dietThe most important factor was diet—andamong ...
Long-term impacts of small but significantlifestyle changes—especially to dietThe following 10 foods were found to beespec...
Potato Chips: The #1 food thatpromotes weight gain.Blame the potatochip.Its the biggestdemon behindthat pound-a-yearweight...
Potatoes: The #2 food that promotesweight gain.Consuming an extrahelping of potatoeseach day — Frenchfried, baked orotherw...
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages The #3food that promotes weight gain.Harvard study foundthat sugar-sweetenedbeverages were oneof...
Unprocessed Red Meat The #4 food thatpromotes weight gain.Single dailyserving ofunprocessed redmeat wasassociated with a13...
Processed Meats The #5 food that promotesweight gain.Alarmingly, a reportconducted by the AmericanInstitute for Cancer Res...
Vegetables The #1 food that promotesweight loss.A vegetable diethas long beenconsidered as thebest way to loseweight.
Whole Grains The #2 food that promotesweight loss.
Fruit The #3 food that promotes weight loss.
Nuts The #4 food that promotes weight loss.
Yogurt The food that promotes weight loss.Yogurt−1.16 lbs(−1.48 to −0.84)
Foods and Weight Gain4-year weight change was most stronglyassociated with the intake ofpotato chips (+1.69 lb), potatoes ...
Refined Food/SweetsWeight gain associated with increasedconsumption of refined grains (0.39 lb perserving per day) was sim...
Trans FatsTrans fat 1.44 (0.95 to 1.94) <0.001A diet rich in trans fatty acids leads toabdominal weight gain compared to a...
Sweets or dessertsSweets or desserts +0.65 (0.31 to 1.00) <0.001
Danger of French FriesPotatoes     2.14 (1.26 to 3.03)French fried * 6.59 * (4.35 to 8.83)Boiled, baked, or mashed 0.99 (0...
Whole vs Refined GrainsWhole grains −0.59 (−0.65 to −0.53)Refined grains +0.56 (0.28 to 0.83)
Participants with greater increases in physicalactivity gained 1.76 fewer pounds within each4-year period.Absolute levels ...
Sleep duration had a U-shaped associationwith weight gain,with greater weightgain occurring withless than 6 hours ormore t...
Increases in time spent watching television(per hour per day) were independentlyassociated with weight gain 0.31 lbAverage...
inversely associatedwith the intake of vegetables (−0.22 lb),whole grains (−0.37 lb), fruits (−0.49 lb), nuts(−0.57 lb), a...
Other lifestyle factors were independentlyassociated with weight change, includingphysical activity (−1.76 lb across quint...
Full vs Low Fat DairyWhole-fat dairy foods +0.25 (0.05 to 0.45)Butter +0.47 (0.23 to 0.71)Cheese +0.13 (−0.08 to 0.34)Whol...
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Diet weight harvard study

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10 Foods That Drive Weight Gain and Loss Identified by Harvard
To conduct their study, the researchers evaluated three large cohorts—from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II), and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS)—of people who were free of chronic diseases and not obese at the start of the evaluation process. They measured specific lifestyle factors and weight gain every four years, with follow-up times ranging from 12 to 20 years.

One striking if somewhat predictable takeaway from the study is that focusing on overall dietary quality—such as eating less refined sugars and refined grains and more minimally processed foods—is probably more important to long-term health than monitoring total calorie or fat intake or other nutritional markers. As co-author Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, stated in a press release accompanying the announcement of the report, "The idea that there are no 'good' or 'bad' foods is a myth that needs to be debunked."

For more information on the report, you can watch the following video of the lead author, Dariush Mozaffarian, discussing the findings, or visit the Harvard School of Public Health's website.

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Diet weight harvard study

  1. 1. 10 Foods That Drive Weight Gain and Loss Identified by Harvard Study
  2. 2. Long-term impacts of small but significant lifestyle changes—especially to dietThe New England Journal of Medicine, a teamof Harvard researchers has revealed theresults of a study of 120,877 people showingthat small changes in lifestyle behaviors suchasphysical activity, sleep duration, and TV-watching arestrongly correlated with long-term weightgain.
  3. 3. Long-term impacts of small but significantlifestyle changes—especially to dietThe most important factor was diet—andamong the reports most intriguing findings isprecisely how much weight gain (or loss) canbe attributed to consuming an additional dailyserving of a variety of specific foods over afour-year period.
  4. 4. Long-term impacts of small but significantlifestyle changes—especially to dietThe following 10 foods were found to beespecially correlated with long-term changesin weight (the first five foods promotingweight gain, the second five promoting weightloss).—Daniel Fromson is an associate editor at TheAtlantic, where this post originally appeared.
  5. 5. Potato Chips: The #1 food thatpromotes weight gain.Blame the potatochip.Its the biggestdemon behindthat pound-a-yearweight creep thatplagues us
  6. 6. Potatoes: The #2 food that promotesweight gain.Consuming an extrahelping of potatoeseach day — Frenchfried, baked orotherwise — can addan average of 0.8 of apound to body weightper year.
  7. 7. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages The #3food that promotes weight gain.Harvard study foundthat sugar-sweetenedbeverages were oneof ... most stronglylinked to long-termweight gain amonghealthy women andmen.
  8. 8. Unprocessed Red Meat The #4 food thatpromotes weight gain.Single dailyserving ofunprocessed redmeat wasassociated with a13% increased riskof death from allcauses
  9. 9. Processed Meats The #5 food that promotesweight gain.Alarmingly, a reportconducted by the AmericanInstitute for Cancer Researchrevealed evidence thateating around 50 grams ofprocessed meat (equivalentto a hot dog) each dayincreased chances ofcolorectal cancer by 21%.
  10. 10. Vegetables The #1 food that promotesweight loss.A vegetable diethas long beenconsidered as thebest way to loseweight.
  11. 11. Whole Grains The #2 food that promotesweight loss.
  12. 12. Fruit The #3 food that promotes weight loss.
  13. 13. Nuts The #4 food that promotes weight loss.
  14. 14. Yogurt The food that promotes weight loss.Yogurt−1.16 lbs(−1.48 to −0.84)
  15. 15. Foods and Weight Gain4-year weight change was most stronglyassociated with the intake ofpotato chips (+1.69 lb), potatoes (+1.28 lb),sugar-sweetened beverages (+1.00 lb), unpro-cessed red meats (+0.95 lb), and processedmeats (+0.93 lb)
  16. 16. Refined Food/SweetsWeight gain associated with increasedconsumption of refined grains (0.39 lb perserving per day) was similar to that forsweets and desserts (0.41 lb per serving perday).
  17. 17. Trans FatsTrans fat 1.44 (0.95 to 1.94) <0.001A diet rich in trans fatty acids leads toabdominal weight gain compared to a diet richin monounsaturated fats, even when thecalorie intake is equal
  18. 18. Sweets or dessertsSweets or desserts +0.65 (0.31 to 1.00) <0.001
  19. 19. Danger of French FriesPotatoes 2.14 (1.26 to 3.03)French fried * 6.59 * (4.35 to 8.83)Boiled, baked, or mashed 0.99 (0.36 to 1.61)<0.001 in all
  20. 20. Whole vs Refined GrainsWhole grains −0.59 (−0.65 to −0.53)Refined grains +0.56 (0.28 to 0.83)
  21. 21. Participants with greater increases in physicalactivity gained 1.76 fewer pounds within each4-year period.Absolute levels of physical activity were notassociated with weight change
  22. 22. Sleep duration had a U-shaped associationwith weight gain,with greater weightgain occurring withless than 6 hours ormore than 8 hours ofsleep per night.
  23. 23. Increases in time spent watching television(per hour per day) were independentlyassociated with weight gain 0.31 lbAverage American watches 5 hr TV/day= 1.5 lb
  24. 24. inversely associatedwith the intake of vegetables (−0.22 lb),whole grains (−0.37 lb), fruits (−0.49 lb), nuts(−0.57 lb), and yogurt (−0.82 lb)
  25. 25. Other lifestyle factors were independentlyassociated with weight change, includingphysical activity (−1.76 lb across quintiles);alcohol use (0.41 lb per drink per day),sleep (more weight gain with <6 or >8 hours ofsleep), andtelevision watching (0.31 lb per hour per day).
  26. 26. Full vs Low Fat DairyWhole-fat dairy foods +0.25 (0.05 to 0.45)Butter +0.47 (0.23 to 0.71)Cheese +0.13 (−0.08 to 0.34)Whole-fat milk +0.08 (−0.05 to 0.22)Low-fat dairy foods −0.17 (−0.21 to −0.13)Low-fat or skim milk −0.02 (−0.11 to 0.07)Yogurt −1.16 (−1.48 to −0.84)

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