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BIOINSPIRED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN TO
ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE
Maibritt Pedersen Zari
School of Architecture, Victoria Univer...
Contribution to climate change
Mitigation
Climate change impacts
on the built environment
Adaptation
Climate change and th...
‘Climate change [is] now widely viewed as the main challenge
facing humankind for this century. We believe that Biomimicry...
organism level
behaviour level
ecosystem level
Biomimetic architecture
form
material
construction
process
function
form
material
construction
process
function
form
material
construction
process...
1. Mimic the material and energy
effectiveness of living organisms
2. Devise new ways of producing energy
3. Mimic carbon ...
Mick Pearce CH2 project, MelbourneBionic car
Biomimicry for energy effectiveness and energy efficiency
Biomimetic energy generation for mitigating climate change
Artificial photosynthesis
Dr. Wayne Campbell, Massey University...
Biomimetic energy generation for mitigating climate change
Ocean current electricity generator
BioPower, Australia
Carbon sequestration based on muscle enzymes
C02 Solutions, Quebec
Biomimetic sequestration and storage of carbon
Carbon –based polymers
Novomer, Cornell University
Biomimetic Sequestering and storing carbon
1. Respond to direct impacts
2. Consider built environment as a system
Biomimicry to adapt to climate change
Responding to direct impacts of climate change
Teatro del Agua, Canary Islands
Grimshaw Architects
Improving the built environment as a system
Mithūn Architects and GreenWorks Landscape Architecture
Lloyd Crossing Project...
Biomimetic Mitigation of Climate Change Causes in the Built Environment
Biomimicry to increase energy efficiency
Biomimicr...
BIOINSPIRED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN TO
ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE
Maibritt Pedersen Zari
School of Architecture, Victoria Univer...
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Bio-inspired architectural design to adapt to climate change

Conference presentation: 2008, Pedersen Zari, M. 'Bio-inspired architectural design to adapt to climate change'. World Sustainable Building Conference. Melbourne, Australia.

International research suggests that the built environment may be responsible for at least a third of global green house gas (GHG) emissions and that measures should be implemented to mitigate these. It is also the built environment, as the principle habitat of humans that will need to adapt to climate change impacts to keep people comfortable and safe. Architects and designers may need to explore new ideas that are reflective of a shift in both climate and in expectations of the built environment. This paper explores the potential of biomimicry, where organisms or ecosystems are mimicked in human design. The question is posed: in what way is mimicking the living world useful in the design of buildings that are able to either mitigate green house gas emissions or adapt to climate change impacts?

This paper investigates two possible options for an architectural biomimetic response to climate change. The first is integrating biomimetic technologies able to mitigate green house gas emissions into buildings. The second approach is use biomimicry to adapt to the direct impacts of climate change on the built environment. Documented successes and potential benefits and difficulties inherent in such approaches are discussed.

As well as a reduced or potentially negative carbon footprint for the built environment, this paper analyses further significant benefits that such an approach may offer. It is posited that the incorporation of an understanding of the living world into architectural design could be a significant step towards the creation of a built environment that is more sustainable and one where the potential for positive integration with and restoration of natural carbon cycles is increased.

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Bio-inspired architectural design to adapt to climate change

  1. 1. BIOINSPIRED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN TO ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE Maibritt Pedersen Zari School of Architecture, Victoria University, New Zealand Maibritt.pedersen@vuw.ac.nz
  2. 2. Contribution to climate change Mitigation Climate change impacts on the built environment Adaptation Climate change and the built environment
  3. 3. ‘Climate change [is] now widely viewed as the main challenge facing humankind for this century. We believe that Biomimicry has a huge potential to tackle some of major issues raised by this global change’ (Biomimicry Europa 2006).
  4. 4. organism level behaviour level ecosystem level Biomimetic architecture
  5. 5. form material construction process function form material construction process function form material construction process function The building looks like a termite. The building is made from the same material as a termite (a material that mimics termite exoskeleton / skin for example). The building is made in the same way as a termite (it goes through various growth cycles for example). The building works in the same way as an individual termite (it produces hydrogen efficiently through meta-genomics for example). The building functions like a termite in a larger context (it recycles cellulose waste and creates soil for example). The building looks like it was made by a termite (a replica of a termite mound for example). The building is made from the same materials that a termite builds with (using digested fine soil as the primary material for example). The building is made in the same way that a termite would build in (piling earth in certain places at certain times for example). The building works in the same way as a termite mound would (by careful orientation, shape, materials selection and natural ventilation for example), or it mimics how termites work together. The building functions in the same way that it would if made by termites (internal conditions are regulated to be optimal and thermally stable for example). It may also function in the same way that a termite mound does in a larger context. The building looks like an ecosystem (a termite would live in). The building is made from the same kind of materials that (a termite) ecosystem is made of (it uses naturally occurring common compounds, and water as the primary chemical medium for example). The building is assembled in the same way as a (termite) ecosystem (principles of succession and increasing complexity over time are used for ex ample). The building works in the same way as a (termite) ecosystem (it captures and converts energy from the sun, it stores water for example). The building is able to function in the same way that a (termite) ecosystem would and forms part of a complex system by utilizing the relationships between processes (it is able to participate in the hydrological, carbon, nitrogen cycles etc in a similar way to an ecosystem for example). Organism level (Mimicry of a specific organism) Behaviou r level (Mimicry of how an organism behaves or relates to it’s larger context) Ecosystem level (Mimicry of an ecosystem) DaimlerChrysler Bionic car Lloyd Crossing Project CH2 project Brunel Tunnelling Shield The Lotus Effect Waterloo International Terminal Teatro del Agua Carbon Sequestration
  6. 6. 1. Mimic the material and energy effectiveness of living organisms 2. Devise new ways of producing energy 3. Mimic carbon sequestration and storage seen in living organisms. Biomimicry to mitigate green house gas emissions
  7. 7. Mick Pearce CH2 project, MelbourneBionic car Biomimicry for energy effectiveness and energy efficiency
  8. 8. Biomimetic energy generation for mitigating climate change Artificial photosynthesis Dr. Wayne Campbell, Massey University, NZ
  9. 9. Biomimetic energy generation for mitigating climate change Ocean current electricity generator BioPower, Australia
  10. 10. Carbon sequestration based on muscle enzymes C02 Solutions, Quebec Biomimetic sequestration and storage of carbon
  11. 11. Carbon –based polymers Novomer, Cornell University Biomimetic Sequestering and storing carbon
  12. 12. 1. Respond to direct impacts 2. Consider built environment as a system Biomimicry to adapt to climate change
  13. 13. Responding to direct impacts of climate change Teatro del Agua, Canary Islands Grimshaw Architects
  14. 14. Improving the built environment as a system Mithūn Architects and GreenWorks Landscape Architecture Lloyd Crossing Project proposed for Portland, Oregon.
  15. 15. Biomimetic Mitigation of Climate Change Causes in the Built Environment Biomimicry to increase energy efficiency Biomimicry for carbon sequestration / storage Biomimicry to replace the use of fossil fuels Short term Medium term Long term Biomimetic technology to address direct impacts Systemic improvement – ecosystem mimicry Biomimetic Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts in the Built Environment Time line of biomimetic approaches to address climate change
  16. 16. BIOINSPIRED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN TO ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE Maibritt Pedersen Zari School of Architecture, Victoria University, New Zealand Maibritt.pedersen@vuw.ac.nz

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