Engagement, Reach and Control(Pick Two)Dr. Kris EricksonSenior Lecturer in New MediaBournemouth Universitykerickson@bourne...
Macro: Digitalisation / ConvergenceSource: Hesmondhalgh (2010) The Cultural Industries; Jenkins (2006) Convergence Culture...
•Number of web links•Popularity of music•Book sales on Amazon•Number of twitter followers•Revenue per user (RPU)•Academic ...
Why?• Communication about what is popular allows cognitiveeconomies in humans who must make snap judgments.• More visibili...
Source: Mayfield (2006)Power law of Participation
Ho & Dempsey, 2010Motivations to share/forward online content
Implications: Cultural ProductionParticipatory cultureRead/write webPeer productionProsumptionUser-generated contentMass c...
IP ownership, control and parody• Parody is a major aspect of YouTube’s user-generated video platform.Adam Samberg’s (left...
Examples of music video parody:We found over 9000 parodies referencing 343 hitcommercial music videos from 2011. Here is a...
Implications: Marketing• The separation betweenproduction and consumptionspheres is breaking down.• Marketing, once organi...
The ‘postmodern’ political campaignSource: Erickson & Lilleker (2012)
Example: Political CrisisIn 2008, accused criminal MasSelamat bin Kastari (MSK)escaped from jail in SingaporeDeemed highly...
Public response:Rumour, superstition, conspiracy• Ideas vastly more spreadable,in some ways more drillableand more engagin...
Source: textsfromhillary.tumblr.com / 2011 photograph Kevin Lamarque for Reuters
Source: American Society of Civil Engineers / SocialFish 2010
Conclusions• Intellectual property owners are clinging to oldbusiness models, unwilling to let go of their familiarpositio...
Thank youfor your attention!I would be delighted to discuss matters furtherwith you by email atkerickson@bournemouth.ac.uk
FoL: Engagement, Reach and Control
FoL: Engagement, Reach and Control
FoL: Engagement, Reach and Control
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FoL: Engagement, Reach and Control

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FoL: Engagement, Reach and Control

  1. 1. Engagement, Reach and Control(Pick Two)Dr. Kris EricksonSenior Lecturer in New MediaBournemouth Universitykerickson@bournemouth.ac.uk
  2. 2. Macro: Digitalisation / ConvergenceSource: Hesmondhalgh (2010) The Cultural Industries; Jenkins (2006) Convergence CulturePictured: “black box” convergence. One device toaccess all types of content.But also:• Platform agnostic: Many devices able to accesssame content• Cultural convergence, access to symbols andcultural products from different cultures• Regulatory convergence: EU single marketharmonization.Digitalisation:• High production costs, low reproduction costs• Lower barriers to entry for indies / amateurs
  3. 3. •Number of web links•Popularity of music•Book sales on Amazon•Number of twitter followers•Revenue per user (RPU)•Academic citations•Population of citiesPower law – Pareto Principle – Rich-get-richer80 per cent of impact is produced by 20 per cent of cases
  4. 4. Why?• Communication about what is popular allows cognitiveeconomies in humans who must make snap judgments.• More visibility leads to greater adoption in a get-richer loop.• Network effects – utility increase.
  5. 5. Source: Mayfield (2006)Power law of Participation
  6. 6. Ho & Dempsey, 2010Motivations to share/forward online content
  7. 7. Implications: Cultural ProductionParticipatory cultureRead/write webPeer productionProsumptionUser-generated contentMass creativityDIY mediaSemiotic democracyThe social factoryLoser-generated content
  8. 8. IP ownership, control and parody• Parody is a major aspect of YouTube’s user-generated video platform.Adam Samberg’s (left) Lazy Sunday, a parodic send-up of both hip hop music andthe Chronicles of Narnia film franchise, was an early viral success on YouTube, butsparked an intellectual property dispute with rightsholder NBC.
  9. 9. Examples of music video parody:We found over 9000 parodies referencing 343 hitcommercial music videos from 2011. Here is atypical exampleOriginal: LMFAO Sexy and I know itParody: Average and I know it
  10. 10. Implications: Marketing• The separation betweenproduction and consumptionspheres is breaking down.• Marketing, once organizedaround a home / point of saledichotomy, has had to adapt.• The street emerged as a site ofpotential marketing activity,now supplemented by personalmedia
  11. 11. The ‘postmodern’ political campaignSource: Erickson & Lilleker (2012)
  12. 12. Example: Political CrisisIn 2008, accused criminal MasSelamat bin Kastari (MSK)escaped from jail in SingaporeDeemed highly dangerous,connected with terrorismThe authorities did as expected,and issued a press release /wanted posterBut they left out someimportant details…
  13. 13. Public response:Rumour, superstition, conspiracy• Ideas vastly more spreadable,in some ways more drillableand more engaging, than theofficial story. Connect withindividual subject’s beliefs andsocial context.Parody, persiflage• critiquing the officialresponse / failure, mockingpublic figures to reduce theircredibility
  14. 14. Source: textsfromhillary.tumblr.com / 2011 photograph Kevin Lamarque for Reuters
  15. 15. Source: American Society of Civil Engineers / SocialFish 2010
  16. 16. Conclusions• Intellectual property owners are clinging to oldbusiness models, unwilling to let go of their familiarposition.• Brand marketers are unsure how much control torelinquish to reap benefits of online• Political actors must engage in ideological jujitsu in amemespace that plays by a different set of rules
  17. 17. Thank youfor your attention!I would be delighted to discuss matters furtherwith you by email atkerickson@bournemouth.ac.uk

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