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Medical Intuition in Veterinary Practice

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This presentation, on blending science and intuition for better patient care, was given by holistic veterinarian, Dr. Chris King, in 2006 at the Annual Conference of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association. Please enjoy, and move through these slides at your own pace.

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Medical Intuition in Veterinary Practice

  1. 1. Medical Intuition in Veterinary Practice blending science and intuition for better patient care Christine King BVSc, MACVSc, MVetClinStud 2006 Annual Conference of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association
  2. 2. “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.” Albert Einstein
  3. 3. “If I can do it, then anyone can do it!” Chris King
  4. 4. Intuition: A Common Sense
  5. 5. “Intuition is just another sense, like seeing or feeling or hearing. Moreover, it’s a sense we all share. We are all intuitive.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  6. 6. Intuition: A Common Sense definitions of intuition:
  7. 7. Intuition: A Common Sense definitions of intuition: process of reaching accurate conclusions based on inadequate information
  8. 8. Intuition: A Common Sense definitions of intuition: process of reaching accurate conclusions based on inadequate information direct perception of facts outside the range of our 5 senses and independent of any reasoning process
  9. 9. Intuition: A Common Sense definitions of intuition: process of reaching accurate conclusions based on inadequate information direct perception of facts outside the range of our 5 senses and independent of any reasoning process spontaneous knowing - “I don’t know how I know; I just know!”
  10. 10. “The word ‘intuition’ derives from the Latin intueri, meaning to look within. Intuition is something we see and hear and feel within, an internal language that facilitates insight and understanding.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  11. 11. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition:
  12. 12. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition: suddenness and immediacy of knowledge (“gestalt”)
  13. 13. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition: suddenness and immediacy of knowledge (“gestalt”) often unexpected content
  14. 14. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition: suddenness and immediacy of knowledge (“gestalt”) often unexpected content nonanalytical, nonrational, nonlogical
  15. 15. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition: suddenness and immediacy of knowledge (“gestalt”) often unexpected content nonanalytical, nonrational, nonlogical sense of confidence, certainty of the truth of intuitive insights
  16. 16. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition: suddenness and immediacy of knowledge (“gestalt”) often unexpected content nonanalytical, nonrational, nonlogical sense of confidence, certainty of the truth of intuitive insights associated feeling of empathy
  17. 17. Intuition: A Common Sense general characteristics of intuition: suddenness and immediacy of knowledge (“gestalt”) often unexpected content nonanalytical, nonrational, nonlogical sense of confidence, certainty of the truth of intuitive insights associated feeling of empathy difficulty putting into words
  18. 18. “Intuition is processed multimodally in the body and the brain, through dreams, in the form of sights, sounds, tastes, and smells, and in the form of body sensations, movements, and emotions.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  19. 19. Intuition: A Common Sense we receive information throughout our bodies
  20. 20. Intuition: A Common Sense we receive information throughout our bodies we perceive it and make sense and use of it in our brains
  21. 21. Intuition: A Common Sense we receive information throughout our bodies we perceive it and make sense and use of it in our brains effective application requires the integration of left and right cerebral hemispheres
  22. 22. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics:
  23. 23. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics: the seat of logic
  24. 24. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics: the seat of logic sequential, rational, linear; fact-based
  25. 25. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics: the seat of logic sequential, rational, linear; fact-based focused on the external world
  26. 26. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics: the seat of logic sequential, rational, linear; fact-based focused on the external world constantly searches for value in information received
  27. 27. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics: the seat of logic sequential, rational, linear; fact-based focused on the external world constantly searches for value in information received strengths are speech and language
  28. 28. Intuition: A Common Sense left brain characteristics: the seat of logic sequential, rational, linear; fact-based focused on the external world constantly searches for value in information received strengths are speech and language considered the “masculine” or yang side
  29. 29. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics:
  30. 30. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics: the seat of emotions
  31. 31. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics: the seat of emotions spontaneous, irrational, receptive; gestalt oriented
  32. 32. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics: the seat of emotions spontaneous, irrational, receptive; gestalt oriented focused on the inner world
  33. 33. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics: the seat of emotions spontaneous, irrational, receptive; gestalt oriented focused on the inner world interested in beauty and the relatedness of things
  34. 34. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics: the seat of emotions spontaneous, irrational, receptive; gestalt oriented focused on the inner world interested in beauty and the relatedness of things its language is images and feelings
  35. 35. Intuition: A Common Sense right brain characteristics: the seat of emotions spontaneous, irrational, receptive; gestalt oriented focused on the inner world interested in beauty and the relatedness of things its language is images and feelings considered the “feminine” or yin side
  36. 36. “The two hemispheres complement each other. The right brain provides the intuition while the left gives it expression and communicates the intuition to the individual and to others. Without input from the left brain, the right brain’s messages to you can be gibberish.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  37. 37. Intuition: A Common Sense effective application requires the integration of left and right cerebral hemispheres
  38. 38. Intuition: A Common Sense effective application requires the integration of left and right cerebral hemispheres a challenge in our left-brain dominant culture
  39. 39. Intuition: A Common Sense effective application requires the integration of left and right cerebral hemispheres a challenge in our left-brain dominant culture takes intention and practice
  40. 40. Intuition: A Common Sense make intuitive evaluation a 2-step process
  41. 41. Intuition: A Common Sense make intuitive evaluation a 2-step process Step 1: Download
  42. 42. Intuition: A Common Sense make intuitive evaluation a 2-step process Step 1: Download set aside the analytical imperatives of the left brain
  43. 43. Intuition: A Common Sense make intuitive evaluation a 2-step process Step 1: Download set aside the analytical imperatives of the left brain just receive and collect the unfiltered information
  44. 44. Intuition: A Common Sense make intuitive evaluation a 2-step process Step 1: Download set aside the analytical imperatives of the left brain just receive and collect the unfiltered information Step 2: Analyse
  45. 45. Intuition: A Common Sense make intuitive evaluation a 2-step process Step 1: Download set aside the analytical imperatives of the left brain just receive and collect the unfiltered information Step 2: Analyse apply the left brain to making use of the information
  46. 46. Intuition: A Common Sense with practice, it becomes easy to toggle back and forth between left and right sides during evaluation
  47. 47. Intuition: A Common Sense with practice, it becomes easy to toggle back and forth between left and right sides during evaluation steps 1 and 2 occur almost simultaneously
  48. 48. Intuition: A Common Sense with practice, it becomes easy to toggle back and forth between left and right sides during evaluation steps 1 and 2 occur almost simultaneously can then get more refined with evaluation
  49. 49. Intuition: A Common Sense with practice, it becomes easy to toggle back and forth between left and right sides during evaluation steps 1 and 2 occur almost simultaneously can then get more refined with evaluation ask questions - e.g. clarification, explanation, more details
  50. 50. Intuition: A Common Sense with practice, it becomes easy to toggle back and forth between left and right sides during evaluation steps 1 and 2 occur almost simultaneously can then get more refined with evaluation ask questions - e.g. clarification, explanation, more details test various treatment options for good fit
  51. 51. “Intuitive information is coming at us all the time, every day in every way. Most of us, though, go through life with the volume turned to low… We learn to ignore it most of the time. We’re so out of touch with our intuition that we don’t even recognize it when it comes.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  52. 52. Getting Started
  53. 53. “For most of us, the first step toward hearing the language of intuition requires that we become open to accepting another, seemingly illogical way of perceiving and receiving information.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  54. 54. Getting Started modes of information gathering:
  55. 55. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours
  56. 56. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours auditory - sounds, word thoughts
  57. 57. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours auditory - sounds, word thoughts kinaesthetic - touch, bodily sensations
  58. 58. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours auditory - sounds, word thoughts kinaesthetic - touch, bodily sensations other senses - smell, taste
  59. 59. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours auditory - sounds, word thoughts kinaesthetic - touch, bodily sensations other senses - smell, taste emotions - mood, feelings experienced in the body
  60. 60. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours auditory - sounds, word thoughts kinaesthetic - touch, bodily sensations other senses - smell, taste emotions - mood, feelings experienced in the body combinations of any of the above
  61. 61. Getting Started our culture and education emphasise visual and auditory modes
  62. 62. Getting Started our culture and education emphasise visual and auditory modes becoming fluent in the language of intuition requires that you find your own intuitive style
  63. 63. Getting Started our culture and education emphasise visual and auditory modes becoming fluent in the language of intuition requires that you find your own intuitive style the modes you use in everyday life are the ones your intuition is most likely to use
  64. 64. Getting Started our culture and education emphasise visual and auditory modes becoming fluent in the language of intuition requires that you find your own intuitive style the modes you use in everyday life are the ones your intuition is most likely to use and the ones you’ll be most adept at harnessing
  65. 65. Getting Started my intuitive style: visual - “seeing” the body and the tissues of interest auditory - word thoughts emotions - emotional state of the patient sometimes mild kinaesthetic sensations, sounds, odours, etc.
  66. 66. Getting Started modes of information gathering: visual - images, shapes, colours auditory - sounds, word thoughts kinaesthetic - touch, bodily sensations other senses - smell, taste emotions - mood, feelings experienced in the body combinations of any of the above
  67. 67. Getting Started tips for getting started: suspend disbelief quiet the mind positive expectancy notice what you notice trust what you receive stay with it
  68. 68. Getting Started suspend disbelief
  69. 69. Getting Started suspend disbelief disbelief and doubt (partial belief) are powerful blocks
  70. 70. Getting Started suspend disbelief disbelief and doubt (partial belief) are powerful blocks deliberately set aside doubts and frank disbelief
  71. 71. Getting Started suspend disbelief disbelief and doubt (partial belief) are powerful blocks deliberately set aside doubts and frank disbelief play with “What if it really is possible for me to do this?”
  72. 72. Getting Started quiet the mind
  73. 73. Getting Started quiet the mind let go of any thoughts and preconceptions about the situation
  74. 74. Getting Started quiet the mind let go of any thoughts and preconceptions about the situation relax; just be open to the process
  75. 75. Getting Started quiet the mind let go of any thoughts and preconceptions about the situation relax; just be open to the process be willing to just be in a state of not knowing, for however long it takes
  76. 76. Getting Started quiet the mind let go of any thoughts and preconceptions about the situation relax; just be open to the process be willing to just be in a state of not knowing, for however long it takes in this quiet, receptive, inquisitive, not-knowing state we are most open to intuitive information
  77. 77. Getting Started positive expectancy
  78. 78. Getting Started positive expectancy expect that the information you seek is available and will be provided
  79. 79. Getting Started positive expectancy expect that the information you seek is available and will be provided trust the process, even if nothing seems to happen at first
  80. 80. Getting Started notice what you notice
  81. 81. Getting Started notice what you notice in that open state of possibility and expectancy, gently bring your mind to the patient or problem
  82. 82. Getting Started notice what you notice in that open state of possibility and expectancy, gently bring your mind to the patient or problem without zeroing in on any particular thing, just notice where your attention is drawn…
  83. 83. Getting Started notice what you notice in that open state of possibility and expectancy, gently bring your mind to the patient or problem without zeroing in on any particular thing, just notice where your attention is drawn… what you’re feeling in your own body…
  84. 84. Getting Started notice what you notice in that open state of possibility and expectancy, gently bring your mind to the patient or problem without zeroing in on any particular thing, just notice where your attention is drawn… what you’re feeling in your own body… what images or words pop into your mind
  85. 85. Getting Started trust what you receive
  86. 86. Getting Started trust what you receive trust that what you’re receiving is true…
  87. 87. Getting Started trust what you receive trust that what you’re receiving is true… no matter how illogical or improbable it may seem
  88. 88. Getting Started trust what you receive trust that what you’re receiving is true… no matter how illogical or improbable it may seem if it feels true, then it probably is true
  89. 89. Getting Started trust what you receive trust that what you’re receiving is true… no matter how illogical or improbable it may seem if it feels true, then it probably is true it will make sense in wider context
  90. 90. Getting Started stay with it
  91. 91. Getting Started stay with it stay with it until you understand the information you’ve received
  92. 92. Getting Started stay with it stay with it until you understand the information you’ve received ask for clarification or more information if needed
  93. 93. Getting Started stay with it stay with it until you understand the information you’ve received ask for clarification or more information if needed stay with it until you’re sure you have the whole picture
  94. 94. Getting Started stay with it stay with it through the ups and downs of learning this skill
  95. 95. Getting Started stay with it stay with it through the ups and downs of learning this skill as with any new skill, mastery takes patience and persistence
  96. 96. My Approach
  97. 97. My Approach begin with a visual template of the patient write down initial impressions do a quick scan of the whole body do a detailed evaluation of all body systems devise a treatment plan
  98. 98. My Approach begin with a visual template of the patient
  99. 99. My Approach begin with a visual template of the patient patient’s name
  100. 100. My Approach begin with a visual template of the patient patient’s name some basic descriptors - age, breed, gender, colour
  101. 101. My Approach begin with a visual template of the patient patient’s name some basic descriptors - age, breed, gender, colour brief description of the problem(s)
  102. 102. My Approach write down initial impressions
  103. 103. My Approach write down initial impressions note any thoughts, feelings, images, sensations
  104. 104. My Approach write down initial impressions note any thoughts, feelings, images, sensations may be physical or mental/emotional, often both
  105. 105. My Approach write down initial impressions note any thoughts, feelings, images, sensations may be physical or mental/emotional, often both regardless, they usually represent the crux of the matter
  106. 106. My Approach do a quick scan of the whole body
  107. 107. My Approach do a quick scan of the whole body run my attention lightly over the entire body
  108. 108. My Approach do a quick scan of the whole body run my attention lightly over the entire body “notice what you notice”
  109. 109. My Approach do a quick scan of the whole body run my attention lightly over the entire body “notice what you notice” where my attention is first drawn usually represents the principal problem area(s)
  110. 110. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems
  111. 111. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems as with physical exam, follow a routine so no part is overlooked
  112. 112. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems as with physical exam, follow a routine so no part is overlooked evaluate as observer
  113. 113. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems as with physical exam, follow a routine so no part is overlooked evaluate as observer can also evaluate as “self”
  114. 114. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems focus on areas identified in initial scan, plus any other areas that hold my attention
  115. 115. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems focus on areas identified in initial scan, plus any other areas that hold my attention also keep the big picture in mind: patterns of disorder, relatedness of separate abnormalities
  116. 116. My Approach do a detailed evaluation of all body systems focus on areas identified in initial scan, plus any other areas that hold my attention also keep the big picture in mind: patterns of disorder, relatedness of separate abnormalities integrate left and right brain functions
  117. 117. My Approach devise a treatment plan
  118. 118. My Approach devise a treatment plan integration of left brain and right brain is crucial here, too
  119. 119. My Approach devise a treatment plan integration of left brain and right brain is crucial here, too left brain trolls the memory for solutions, based on learned knowledge and experience
  120. 120. My Approach devise a treatment plan integration of left brain and right brain is crucial here, too left brain trolls the memory for solutions, based on learned knowledge and experience right brain offers a sense of “fitness” of various left-brain solutions…
  121. 121. My Approach devise a treatment plan integration of left brain and right brain is crucial here, too left brain trolls the memory for solutions, based on learned knowledge and experience right brain offers a sense of “fitness” of various left-brain solutions… and sometimes even novel solutions (inspiration)
  122. 122. My Approach blending science and intuition:
  123. 123. My Approach blending science and intuition: reconciling and integrating the separate functions and talents of the two cerebral hemispheres
  124. 124. My Approach blending science and intuition: reconciling and integrating the separate functions and talents of the two cerebral hemispheres combining scientific training and clinical experience with intuitive insights for a more complete view
  125. 125. My Approach blending science and intuition: reconciling and integrating the separate functions and talents of the two cerebral hemispheres combining scientific training and clinical experience with intuitive insights for a more complete view when both aspects of our intellect work together, then we experience synergism, not just summation
  126. 126. My Approach blending science and intuition: reconciling and integrating the separate functions and talents of the two cerebral hemispheres combining scientific training and clinical experience with intuitive insights for a more complete view when both aspects of our intellect work together, then we experience synergism, not just summation wholism in action
  127. 127. Dream 8-yr-old Paint mare chestnut & white blue eyes
  128. 128. A’la 14-yr-old Arabian gelding chestnut Dream’s pasturemate
  129. 129. Wally 1-yr-old chocolate Lab castrated male approx. 5 mths old here Miss Tiger Lilly ~5-yr-old brindle mix spayed female
  130. 130. Freddie “senior” grey tabby & white cat castrated male
  131. 131. Challenges and Insights
  132. 132. Challenges and Insights differentiating intuition from imagination barriers to intuition turning obstacles into pathways
  133. 133. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition:
  134. 134. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: imagination - something the mind makes up from its vast archives of stored information and beliefs
  135. 135. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: imagination - something the mind makes up from its vast archives of stored information and beliefs intuition - information that arises from beyond the current resources and limits of the individual mind
  136. 136. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: as with dreams, imagination is one avenue through which our intuition guides us
  137. 137. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: as with dreams, imagination is one avenue through which our intuition guides us but when endeavouring to distinguish fact from fiction, it’s important to learn to recognise the difference between the two
  138. 138. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: as with dreams, imagination is one avenue through which our intuition guides us but when endeavouring to distinguish fact from fiction, it’s important to learn to recognise the difference between the two the key lies in the associated emotional charge
  139. 139. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: no positive/negative emotional charge attached to intuitive information
  140. 140. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: no positive/negative emotional charge attached to intuitive information no “negative” emotion (e.g. fear)
  141. 141. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: no positive/negative emotional charge attached to intuitive information no “negative” emotion (e.g. fear) no “positive” emotion (e.g. excitement, self-satisfaction)
  142. 142. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: no positive/negative emotional charge attached to intuitive information no “negative” emotion (e.g. fear) no “positive” emotion (e.g. excitement, self-satisfaction) simply a sense of expanded awareness and interconnection
  143. 143. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: no positive/negative emotional charge attached to intuitive information no “negative” emotion (e.g. fear) no “positive” emotion (e.g. excitement, self-satisfaction) simply a sense of expanded awareness and interconnection positive/negative emotions may follow, based on how we judge the information in relation to our selves
  144. 144. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: genuine intuitive guidance does not come through the EGO…
  145. 145. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: genuine intuitive guidance does not come through the EGO… so there is no associated sense of self-preservation or self- aggrandisement involved
  146. 146. Challenges and Insights differentiating imagination from intuition: genuine intuitive guidance does not come through the EGO… so there is no associated sense of self-preservation or self- aggrandisement involved the emotions it elicits include gratitude, humility, peace, calm resolve, and a clear sense of purpose and direction
  147. 147. “I felt the sudden sensation of something new, unexpected, and brilliant flying into my inner field of vision, broadening my knowledge and my range. Working in that intuitive field feels like‘touching the face of God’. It’s truly a transcendent experience.” Mona Lisa Schulz, MD, PhD
  148. 148. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition:
  149. 149. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition: our intuition is always available to us…
  150. 150. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition: our intuition is always available to us… but there are many different factors that can interfere with or block the free flow of information
  151. 151. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition: our intuition is always available to us… but there are many different factors that can interfere with or block the free flow of information they include physical, mental, and emotional factors
  152. 152. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition: physical - tiredness, full stomach, headache, illness
  153. 153. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition: physical - tiredness, full stomach, headache, illness mental - being rushed for time, mental turmoil, doubts, ego
  154. 154. Challenges and Insights barriers to intuition: physical - tiredness, full stomach, headache, illness mental - being rushed for time, mental turmoil, doubts, ego emotional - attachment to the animal or the outcome, fear
  155. 155. Challenges and Insights fear…
  156. 156. Challenges and Insights fear… fear of being wrong
  157. 157. Challenges and Insights fear… fear of being wrong fear of being right
  158. 158. Challenges and Insights fear… fear of being wrong fear of being right fear of failure
  159. 159. Challenges and Insights fear… fear of being wrong fear of being right fear of failure fear of appearing foolish, being ridiculed or blacklisted
  160. 160. Challenges and Insights fear… fear of being wrong fear of being right fear of failure fear of appearing foolish, being ridiculed or blacklisted fear of bad news
  161. 161. Challenges and Insights simply acknowledging fear can be enough to dispel it or disable it long enough for intuition to get through
  162. 162. Challenges and Insights simply acknowledging fear can be enough to dispel it or disable it long enough for intuition to get through sometimes it’s necessary to go back to basics:
  163. 163. Challenges and Insights simply acknowledging fear can be enough to dispel it or disable it long enough for intuition to get through sometimes it’s necessary to go back to basics: suspend disbelief
  164. 164. Challenges and Insights simply acknowledging fear can be enough to dispel it or disable it long enough for intuition to get through sometimes it’s necessary to go back to basics: suspend disbelief quiet the mind
  165. 165. Challenges and Insights simply acknowledging fear can be enough to dispel it or disable it long enough for intuition to get through sometimes it’s necessary to go back to basics: suspend disbelief quiet the mind be OK with not knowing…
  166. 166. Challenges and Insights confusion and frustration:
  167. 167. Challenges and Insights confusion and frustration: getting past this block can be simply a matter of taking a breath, relaxing, and asking for clarity
  168. 168. Challenges and Insights confusion and frustration: getting past this block can be simply a matter of taking a breath, relaxing, and asking for clarity “I don’t understand this; please show me in some other way.”
  169. 169. Challenges and Insights confusion and frustration: getting past this block can be simply a matter of taking a breath, relaxing, and asking for clarity “I don’t understand this; please show me in some other way.” with an attitude of positive expectancy, typically the confusion/frustration then clears
  170. 170. Challenges and Insights confusion and frustration: other times, I just have to sit patiently in that ungrounded, uncertain, uncomfortable state of not knowing, and wait
  171. 171. Challenges and Insights confusion and frustration: other times, I just have to sit patiently in that ungrounded, uncertain, uncomfortable state of not knowing, and wait the more I’ve learned to just stay in that place of uncertainty, the easier and more efficient, accurate, and fun it’s become
  172. 172. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways:
  173. 173. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: one other hurdle is the idea that being able to intuitively “read” a patient means I’ll never make another mistake
  174. 174. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: one other hurdle is the idea that being able to intuitively “read” a patient means I’ll never make another mistake this skill does not make us into perfect diagnosticians or therapists, because we’re still human
  175. 175. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: one other hurdle is the idea that being able to intuitively “read” a patient means I’ll never make another mistake this skill does not make us into perfect diagnosticians or therapists, because we’re still human we filter intuitive information through our current beliefs
  176. 176. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: our left brain continues to analyse, rush to judgment, and dismiss what doesn’t make sense or seem to fit
  177. 177. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: our left brain continues to analyse, rush to judgment, and dismiss what doesn’t make sense or seem to fit and we continue to come up against our ego’s agenda (to protect itself from harm)
  178. 178. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: the process of developing your intuitive skills also is a pathway of personal development or spiritual growth
  179. 179. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: the process of developing your intuitive skills also is a pathway of personal development or spiritual growth your habitual patterns of acting and reacting will be revealed
  180. 180. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: the process of developing your intuitive skills also is a pathway of personal development or spiritual growth your habitual patterns of acting and reacting will be revealed your options are to shut down and reinforce these barriers, or open up and begin to dissolve them
  181. 181. Challenges and Insights turning obstacles into pathways: the process of developing your intuitive skills also is a pathway of personal development or spiritual growth your habitual patterns of acting and reacting will be revealed your options are to shut down and reinforce these barriers, or open up and begin to dissolve them The choice is yours.
  182. 182. Resources Awakening Intuition, by Mona Lisa Schulz Limitless Mind, by Russell Targ The Field, by Lynn McTaggart The Living Energy Universe, by Gary Schwartz & Linda Russek The Science of Medical Intuition, (audio CDs) by Caroline Myss & C. Norm Shealy

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