E-Learning Decisions: Modes, Models and Strategies Stephen Downes National Research Council Government Online 2003 Ottawa,...
Modes <ul><li>Emerging trends and technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Forms e-learning can take today </li></ul><ul><li>Guideli...
Models <ul><li>Models for e-learning delivery in large organizations </li></ul><ul><li>The advantages and disadvantages of...
Strategies <ul><li>Finally, a series of strategies for e-learning adoption and implementation will be described </li></ul>...
Modes: Emerging Trends <ul><li>Learning objects and related metadata </li></ul><ul><li>Streaming media, multimedia, audio ...
Modes: Forms of E-Learning <ul><li>E-Learning as computer-based training delivered via the web (asynchronous) </li></ul><u...
Modes: Selection Guidelines <ul><li>Who is your audience? Do they need motivation? Are they already strong learners?  </li...
Models: Delivery Models <ul><li>Centralized – a single resource unit handles all e-learning </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed – a bl...
Models: Centralized <ul><li>Advantages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economies of scale </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency of...
Models: Decentralized <ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local, specialized content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small...
Models: Mixed <ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economies of scale where appropriate, flexible production otherwise...
Strategies: A Corporate Model? <ul><li>Corporate learning is different… </li></ul><ul><li>It is command-driven – but gover...
Strategies: Priority Areas <ul><li>Target and fund key priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Use an RFP process to solicit proposal...
Strategies: Create Demand <ul><li>A  Participaction  of learning </li></ul><ul><li>Promote mental fitness in Canadians </l...
Strategies: Create Competence <ul><li>Teaching learners to teach </li></ul><ul><li>The government’s best instructors are i...
Strategies: Support Services <ul><li>A National Network of Support Services </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers’ resources, includi...
Strategies: Content Repositories <ul><li>A National Learning Object Bank </li></ul><ul><li>Create small and useful learnin...
Strategies: Community <ul><li>Putting GOL learning in the community </li></ul><ul><li>Create learning centers in Canadian ...
Concluding Remarks <ul><li>Select the right mode for the right learning and the right learner </li></ul><ul><li>Employ a m...
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E-Learning Decisions: Modes, Models and Strategies

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Stephen Downes presentation to
Government Online 2003,
Ottawa, Canada, February 25, 2003

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E-Learning Decisions: Modes, Models and Strategies

  1. 1. E-Learning Decisions: Modes, Models and Strategies Stephen Downes National Research Council Government Online 2003 Ottawa, February 25, 2003
  2. 2. Modes <ul><li>Emerging trends and technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Forms e-learning can take today </li></ul><ul><li>Guidelines for the selection of the most appropriate delivery mode </li></ul>
  3. 3. Models <ul><li>Models for e-learning delivery in large organizations </li></ul><ul><li>The advantages and disadvantages of each will be considered within a governmental context. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Strategies <ul><li>Finally, a series of strategies for e-learning adoption and implementation will be described </li></ul><ul><li>These strategies will consider issues such as technical support, student motivation, content creation and distribution, and administration. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Modes: Emerging Trends <ul><li>Learning objects and related metadata </li></ul><ul><li>Streaming media, multimedia, audio and video </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile, contextual, and just-in-time learning </li></ul>
  6. 6. Modes: Forms of E-Learning <ul><li>E-Learning as computer-based training delivered via the web (asynchronous) </li></ul><ul><li>E-learning as providing a new channel of communication in distance learning (mixed) </li></ul><ul><li>E-Learning as a new type of classroom instruction (synchronous) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.fastrak-consulting.co.uk/tactix/Features/basics.htm </li></ul>
  7. 7. Modes: Selection Guidelines <ul><li>Who is your audience? Do they need motivation? Are they already strong learners? </li></ul><ul><li>What is your content? Is it factual data, skills-based, conceptual? </li></ul><ul><li>What are your needs? Do you need to monitor, test, ensure compliance? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Models: Delivery Models <ul><li>Centralized – a single resource unit handles all e-learning </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed – a blend of centralized resources and content provided by separate agencies </li></ul><ul><li>Distributed – both content and resources are provides by separate agencies </li></ul>
  9. 9. Models: Centralized <ul><li>Advantages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economies of scale </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency of product (message, quality) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Disadvantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inability to adapt to local, contextual needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slow speed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overproduction of components </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Models: Decentralized <ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local, specialized content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Smaller, fast to respond to needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tailored production </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Disadvantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Higher cost, ‘re-inventing the wheel’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inconsistent product, quality </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Models: Mixed <ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economies of scale where appropriate, flexible production otherwise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency of format, localized message </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Disadvantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More difficult to manage – who is the ‘client’ and who is the ‘server’? </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Strategies: A Corporate Model? <ul><li>Corporate learning is different… </li></ul><ul><li>It is command-driven – but government cannot compel citizens to learn </li></ul><ul><li>It is driven by the bottom-line – but governments have multiple objectives </li></ul><ul><li>It serves a target market (cherry-picking) – but a government must serve everyone </li></ul>
  13. 13. Strategies: Priority Areas <ul><li>Target and fund key priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Use an RFP process to solicit proposals </li></ul><ul><li>Subject proposals to community review </li></ul><ul><li>Require that proposals satisfy core criteria (demand for program, evidence of quality, certification as appropriate) </li></ul><ul><li>http://mlg-gam.ic.gc.ca/sites/acol-ccael/en/resources/R01_Anderson_Downes/ </li></ul>
  14. 14. Strategies: Create Demand <ul><li>A Participaction of learning </li></ul><ul><li>Promote mental fitness in Canadians </li></ul><ul><li>Public service learning as a role model </li></ul><ul><li>Create incentives – tax breaks, performance bonuses – for evidence of learning </li></ul><ul><li>Extend opportunities into other areas – learning about Canadian government </li></ul>
  15. 15. Strategies: Create Competence <ul><li>Teaching learners to teach </li></ul><ul><li>The government’s best instructors are its own staff – they are the experts </li></ul><ul><li>So: create a program to promote best teaching practices in public service </li></ul><ul><li>Provide teaching support and resources (the government as a university) </li></ul>
  16. 16. Strategies: Support Services <ul><li>A National Network of Support Services </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers’ resources, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reports on current issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Samples, templates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructional design and delivery tools </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students’ resources, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Courses, books, and other resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning tracks, including certification </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Strategies: Content Repositories <ul><li>A National Learning Object Bank </li></ul><ul><li>Create small and useful learning objects in a wide variety of government topics </li></ul><ul><li>Use these learning objects in government sponsored online learning </li></ul><ul><li>Make GOL learning objects available to all Canadian institutions </li></ul>
  18. 18. Strategies: Community <ul><li>Putting GOL learning in the community </li></ul><ul><li>Create learning centers in Canadian communities (piggy-back on CAP sites, Employment offices) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide testing facilities, counselling, advice, support </li></ul><ul><li>Use these centers for localized civil service learning as well (lead by example) </li></ul>
  19. 19. Concluding Remarks <ul><li>Select the right mode for the right learning and the right learner </li></ul><ul><li>Employ a mixed model – centralized services, distributed content </li></ul><ul><li>Deploy strategies that meet wider objectives, provide the resources needed, and base them in the community </li></ul>

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