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supporting people aged 50+
and their carers
Independent advocacy support
Is person-centred and led by the person affected by cancer
Is provided by trained peer volu...
Patients without advocacy support
through investigations and diagnosis said
I went for tests, I was very nervous as I hadn...
Patients and carers say how they were
managing before getting advocacy
support and then how their advocate was
able to hel...
Making treatment and care choices
They said they needed to remove the tumour right
away – I was in a state but I went alon...
During active treatment
I’ve seen so many different people He can help to remind me who is involved in my care
After the o...
Living with and beyond cancer
I was angry and fed up with being in hospital He understood that I wanted to be independent,...
Emotional and practical benefits
throughout the cancer journey
My advocate is there for me to talk about positives and neg...
Call Dorset Macmillan Advocacy to refer:
Telephone 0300 012 0256
E mail macmillan@helpandcare.org.uk
Web dorsetmacmilla...
Call Dorset Macmillan Advocacy to refer:
Telephone 0300 012 0256
E mail macmillan@helpandcare.org.uk
Web dorsetmacmilla...
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Advocacy along the cancer journey

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How advocacy support can positively impact older people affected by cancer.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Advocacy along the cancer journey

  1. 1. supporting people aged 50+ and their carers
  2. 2. Independent advocacy support Is person-centred and led by the person affected by cancer Is provided by trained peer volunteers Is face to face, in the community, at home or in hospital Is confidential and makes time to listen Is about finding appropriate information, discussing concerns and checking understanding to enhance patient health literacy Is about building confidence and empowering patients and carers Offers continuity and is based on a trusting relationship
  3. 3. Patients without advocacy support through investigations and diagnosis said I went for tests, I was very nervous as I hadn’t done anything by myself for years I was diagnosed on my 72nd birthday – living alone isn’t a pleasant experience when you have this sort of news The letter said I should take someone with me… the problem is I don’t know anyone well enough I was diagnosed in the March and I thought – this is my last summer No one should face ‘the void’ that I did while waiting for my results
  4. 4. Patients and carers say how they were managing before getting advocacy support and then how their advocate was able to help them:
  5. 5. Making treatment and care choices They said they needed to remove the tumour right away – I was in a state but I went along with it in a daze I felt such a relief, my advocate had had cancer, I was talking to someone who understood I couldn’t bring myself to look at the leaflets I was given We went through the leaflets and together got the picture of what might be done I couldn’t decide if I wanted to tell my children, I was frozen We have a plan about telling my children, I want the answers clear in my own head first I couldn’t remember anything the consultant said. My memory has begun to fail me We put together a list of questions, he came along with me, he took notes… and he will tell me all about it when we get home
  6. 6. During active treatment I’ve seen so many different people He can help to remind me who is involved in my care After the operation they said I had lung cancer as well… I went to pieces I could share my feelings with her more than anyone else I am carer for my wife who had a stroke and now I am in hospital. She is finding it difficult. He is going to help my wife sort things out – that will be a great weight of my mind. I will be able to concentrate on getting well. I still panic and am confused at times She is there to help me understand things
  7. 7. Living with and beyond cancer I was angry and fed up with being in hospital He understood that I wanted to be independent, he was outside the ‘ring of authority’, I was able to say what I wanted I was unhappy with the service provided by my care agency After talking it through we decided on a course of action and got the issue resolved Side effects meant I had lost the confidence to go out Now, with my advocate behind me, I am going out more, driving and using the bus
  8. 8. Emotional and practical benefits throughout the cancer journey My advocate is there for me to talk about positives and negatives My advocate was able to help me see things clearly My advocate is looking for groups I may enjoy while I have some time left I have been able to express my views and wishes I will not have to go to another appointment alone The support I got meant that I did not give up
  9. 9. Call Dorset Macmillan Advocacy to refer: Telephone 0300 012 0256 E mail macmillan@helpandcare.org.uk Web dorsetmacmillanadvocacy.org Service delivered by Dorset Advocacy and Help and Care Part of the Cancer, Older People and Advocacy Project in partnership with Older People’s Advocacy Alliance OPAAL UK and Macmillan Cancer Support Blog http://opaalcopa.org.uk/ Patient and carer quotes from Every Step of the Way publication 2013
  10. 10. Call Dorset Macmillan Advocacy to refer: Telephone 0300 012 0256 E mail macmillan@helpandcare.org.uk Web dorsetmacmillanadvocacy.org Service delivered by Dorset Advocacy and Help and Care Part of the Cancer, Older People and Advocacy Project in partnership with Older People’s Advocacy Alliance OPAAL UK and Macmillan Cancer Support Blog http://opaalcopa.org.uk/ Patient and carer quotes from Every Step of the Way publication 2013

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