Knowing with out seeing
• You hear brakes squeal
• You hear a loud crash or boom
• You hear glass breaking and maybe a horn blaring
• What just ha...
• To draw a conclusion or make a judgment
• We infer things in what we hear, read or see using
several skills.
• We choose...
• The main idea
• How supporting details support the main idea
• How the sentences and paragraphs relate to one another
• ...
• Directions: Each item in this exercise describes a famous person.
It's your job to infer the name of the person describe...
• 2. Glittering and shaking to the strains of "Proud Mary," this
lady ruled the stage in the sixties, but Ike ruled the ro...
• 1. You have just gotten a pit bull puppy from an animal
shelter. He's lovable but nervous. If you raise your voice
for a...
• 2. You are a high school student sitting in class when a
substitute teacher walks in and announces that your
regular tea...
Inferences
Inferences
Inferences
Inferences
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Inferences

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How to make inferences while you are reading. What is an inference?

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Inferences

  1. 1. Knowing with out seeing
  2. 2. • You hear brakes squeal • You hear a loud crash or boom • You hear glass breaking and maybe a horn blaring • What just happened? • How do you know?
  3. 3. • To draw a conclusion or make a judgment • We infer things in what we hear, read or see using several skills. • We choose the most likely explanation for things based on our own knowledge and experiences. • We are kind of like a computer board • We store information • We draw upon it when we need it • We make a conclusion based on what is stored or known.
  4. 4. • The main idea • How supporting details support the main idea • How the sentences and paragraphs relate to one another • How the pronoun relates to the antecedent (the word to which the pronoun refers) • Know how allusions function • Keep your eye out for how a sentence starts • Rely more on what the author says than what you feel. • Remember, the author is telling his or her story, not your story.
  5. 5. • Directions: Each item in this exercise describes a famous person. It's your job to infer the name of the person described. • 1. A small-town lawyer from Illinois, tall and lanky with an Adam's apple that could have gone down in the Guinness Book of Records had it existed in the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, he changed the face of American history, steering it through a civil war that left both sides bloody. Who knows what more he could have done had an assassin's bullet not cut him down. • The person described is _______________________________ • In drawing the correct inference, which piece of information is more useful: • a. He had a big Adam's apple. b. He steered the nation through a civil war. • Explain your answer
  6. 6. • 2. Glittering and shaking to the strains of "Proud Mary," this lady ruled the stage in the sixties, but Ike ruled the roost until she walked out the door. It took her almost a decade to get back on top but she still remains one of pop's great divas. Closing in on sixty, she can still belt out rock and roll with singers half her age, and "Simply the Best" just may qualify as her own personal theme song. • The person described is _____________________________ • In drawing the appropriate inference, which piece of information is more useful. • a. She ruled the stage but Ike ruled the roost. b. She was a popular singer in the sixties. • Who is this?
  7. 7. • 1. You have just gotten a pit bull puppy from an animal shelter. He's lovable but nervous. If you raise your voice for any reason, he cowers and trembles. If you scold him, he hides. When you got him from the shelter, he had a slight limp and a deep scratch across his nose. •
  8. 8. • 2. You are a high school student sitting in class when a substitute teacher walks in and announces that your regular teacher is ill. Everyone in the class including you erupts in applause. The substitute raps his knuckles on the desk for order, but the students ignore him and talk louder. • Inference:

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