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Read well write well

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This presentation includes information from Donalyn Miller's 2015 presentation about reading response.

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Read well write well

  1. 1. Read Well, Write Well Donalyn Miller
  2. 2. www.slideshare.net/donalynm @donalynbooks www.bookwhisperer.com
  3. 3. “Becoming a reader and a writer has as much to do with assuming an identity as a reader and a writer as it does with acquiring a set of predetermined cognitive skills.” (Serafini, 2013)
  4. 4. Effective reading communities encourage readers’ reactions, spark discussions, and provide real purposes and audiences for writing. (Baker & Moss, 1993)
  5. 5. How do readers respond to the books we read?
  6. 6. What is authentic reading response?
  7. 7. Rosenblatt (Lesesne, 2015) • Personal/ Emotive – “What does your gut tell you?” • Interpretive – “If I were the main character…” • Evaluative – “Is it good or bad?” • Critical – “Analyzing this piece, I see…”
  8. 8. There is evidence to support that a teacher’s views about what reading is impacts students’ perceptions about reading and their long-term interest in it, too.
  9. 9. Teachers who see reading as a way to acquire knowledge, those who take an efferent stance, teach reading as a series of skills to be mastered, processes to fine-tune and apply in order to collect information.
  10. 10. Teachers who take an aesthetic stance towards reading, those who see reading as an emotional and intellectual journey, a relationship between a reader and a writer, approach literacy instruction in this manner.
  11. 11. While it could be argued that both methodologies have benefits when working with young readers, those teachers who have an aesthetic view towards reading are the most influential on the reading motivation and interest of their students (Ruddell, 1994). –The Book Whisperer, 2009
  12. 12. Reading Autobiographies
  13. 13. The Early Years
  14. 14. In-Between
  15. 15. The YA-YA Years
  16. 16. Torn Between Two Covers
  17. 17. What books and reading experiences would form your reading autobiography?
  18. 18. www.whenintime.com Reading Timeline
  19. 19. What was your turning point as a reader?
  20. 20. When you finish your current book, what might you read next? Why?
  21. 21. Our Reading Plans reading time finishing a book specific titles, series, genres, authors some day plans
  22. 22. Reading and writing float on a sea of talk. –James Britton
  23. 23. Literate conversations with peers (as little as ten minutes a day) improve students' reading motivation, comprehension, and test scores. ( Cazden, 1988; Nystrand, 2006)
  24. 24. Sticky Questions
  25. 25. When we can't find my sister, we know she is under the kitchen table, a book in her hand a glass of milk and a small bowl of peanuts beside her. We know we can call Odella's name out loud, slap the table hard with our hands, dance around it singing 'She'll Be Coming 'Round the Mountain’ so many times the song makes us sick and the circling makes us dizzy and still my sister will do nothing more than slowly turn the page.
  26. 26. Work with your table to develop one reading response question you could model with this poem and use with other texts.
  27. 27. I am not my sister. Words from the books curl around each other make little sense until I read them again and again, the story settling into memory. Too slow my teacher says. Read Faster. Too babyish, the teacher says. Read older.
  28. 28. But I don't want to read faster or older or any way else that might make the story disappear too quickly from where it's settling inside my brain, slowly becoming a part of me. A story I will remember long after I've read it for the second, third, tenth, hundredth time.”
  29. 29. Work with your table to develop one reading response question you could model with this poem and use with other texts.
  30. 30. Book Commercials/ Book Talks
  31. 31. Student-Created Displays
  32. 32. Shelfies.
  33. 33. Readies (Laminack, 2015)
  34. 34. Reading Graffiti
  35. 35. Technology and Reading Response
  36. 36. How does technology immersion benefit students? Increases motivation and interest Utilizes multiple modes of written and verbal communication Provides explicit instruction in using technology for personal and academic needs Mirrors the “real world”
  37. 37. Questions for a New Tool (Kleon, 2013)  What was it made for?  How are others using it?  What use can I find for it?
  38. 38. Response Project Sequence
  39. 39. 1. Study books and authors. (READ)
  40. 40. 2. Investigate published models. (RESEARCH)
  41. 41. 3. Determine exemplar criteria. (RUBRIC)
  42. 42. 4. Craft response.(WRIT
  43. 43. 5. Publish. (RECEIVE FEEDBACK & REFLECT)
  44. 44. Content Process Product Learning Environment Differentiation (Tomlinson, 2000)
  45. 45. Allowing students to choose their own texts fosters engagement and increases reading motivation and interest. --Gambrell, Coding, & Palmer (1996); Worthy & McKool (1996); Guthrie & Wigfield (2000)
  46. 46. Managing student responses with choice Katherine Sokolowski
  47. 47. Voxer
  48. 48. Twitter
  49. 49. Instagram
  50. 50. Goodreads
  51. 51. text & pic apps
  52. 52. Pic Collage
  53. 53. Padlet
  54. 54. Padlet
  55. 55. Edmodo
  56. 56. Choosing Technology Tools Provide authentic opportunities for reading response Free sites Student-accessible after project or class ends Teacher-monitoring features
  57. 57. “Online, everyone—the artist and the curator, the master and the apprentice, the expert and the amateur—has the ability to contribute something.” --Austin Kleon
  58. 58. The Nerdy Book Club: Shaping Reading Identity Through Community, Story, and Choice
  59. 59. nerdybookclub.com @nerdybookclub #nerdybookclub facebook.com/nerdybookclub
  60. 60. The simplest way to make sure that we raise literate children is to teach them to read, and to show them that reading is a pleasurable activity. -Neil Gaiman
  61. 61. Teachers who regularly read for pleasure are more likely to use recommended literacy practices in their classrooms than those teachers who do not engage in pleasure reading. (Morrison, Jacobs, and Swinyard 1999; McKool & Gespass, 2009)
  62. 62. They are more likely to recognize that reading is a social activity and to provide opportunity for students to talk about their reading. Morrison, Jacobs, and Swinyard (1999); McKool & Gespass (2009)
  63. 63. “…teachers who are engaged readers are motivated to read, are both strategic and knowledgeable readers, and are socially interactive about what they read. These qualities show up in their classroom interactions and help create students who are, in turn, engaged readers.” Dreher (2002)
  64. 64. “The notion of the teacher as an explicit model necessitates modeling that goes beyond sustained silent reading. Teachers who are explicit models share their own reading experiences so that students understand how reading enriches their lives.” (Gambrell, 1996)
  65. 65. 56% of unenthusiastic readers did not have a teacher who shared a love of reading, while 64% of enthusiastic readers did have such a teacher. (Nathanson, Pruslow and Levitt, 2008)
  66. 66. Stopped at three bookstores on the way home from school. #nerdybookclub Took clothes out of my suitcase to pack more books. #nerdybookclub In the beginning…
  67. 67. We should start our own awards! Katherine S. (@katsok)
  68. 68. December 1, 2011
  69. 69. “Welcome to the Nerdy Book Club. I was waiting for you. I know that you were waiting for me, too.” “Lifelong Member of the Nerdy Book Club” December 2, 2011
  70. 70. Every reader has value and a voice in our community.
  71. 71. Monday Reading Lives
  72. 72. A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one. ― George R.R. Martin, A Dance With Dragons
  73. 73. Select one Reading Lives post to read from our handout. What do you notice? How could you use a post like this one with your students?
  74. 74. Tuesday Author Posts
  75. 75. “To write a good book, you need to read good books.” –Augusta Scattergood
  76. 76. Select one Author Post to read from our handout. What do you notice? How could you use a post like this one with your students?
  77. 77. “It was early on in my career writing for kids (and early on in Nerdy Book Club too, I think) and that one post introduced me to a whole amazing community of educators that I might never have otherwise known. Alexander London
  78. 78. Turns out that writing about a community created by story helped me find my own community. As an author, it was more valuable than I could ever have imagined and as a person who cares about young readers, it was joy to find so many others who do too.” –Alexander London
  79. 79. Wednesday New Book Reviews
  80. 80. Select one New Book Review to read from our handout. What do you notice? How could you use a post like this one with your students?
  81. 81. Thursday Retro Reviews
  82. 82. Share book recommendations with the nerdy folks sitting nearby.
  83. 83. See, that was easy. You should sign up for a post!
  84. 84. Friday Pay It Forward
  85. 85. Select one Pay It Forward post to read from our handout. What do you notice? How could you use a post like this one with your students?
  86. 86. Saturday Top Ten Lists
  87. 87. http://nerdybookclub.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/top-ten-fat-books-by-karin-perry/
  88. 88. Select one Top Ten posts to read from our handout. What do you notice? How could you use a post like this one with your students?
  89. 89. Sunday Surprise Sunday
  90. 90. The simplest way to make sure that we raise literate children is to teach them to read, and to show them that reading is a pleasurable activity. -Neil Gaiman

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