Working with multiple andcomplex needsAlan Kilmister – member National Service User ForumShane Britton – policy officerDom...
Themes for today’s session– Understanding multiple and complex needs– What works– What can PCC’s do?By understanding and a...
What Revolving Doors is forOur mission is to change systems and improve services for peoplewith multiple and complex needs...
What Revolving Doors does:Development &partnershipsPolicy andcommunicationsService userinvolvement
An issue for PCCs• Repeated contactwith the police• Acquisitive crime andanti-social behaviour• Reoffending• Vulnerable ad...
Multiple and complex needs• Multiple problems including:o Poor mental healtho Substance misuseo Practical needs – housing,...
Structural / environmentCommunityOpportunitiesQuality servicesPublic attitudesMediaMultiple needs: understand the dynamicS...
Multiple needs: negative dynamicStructural / environmentPovertyUnemploymentQuality of servicesDiscriminationStigmaNegative...
The research literature also confirms what service users tell us:that when they have multiple needs people experience a po...
Solutions - What Works?• ‘Someone on your side’ - A trusted relationship within a team• An assertive, persistent outreach ...
Current context• Social Justice Strategy• Justice reforms – Rehabilitation strategy• Justice reinvestment• Community budge...
What can PCCs do?1. Strategic leadership2. Commission creatively3. Consult with all those incontact with the criminaljusti...
What can PCCs do?1. Strategic leadership– Create a strategy that drawstogether opportunities forchange in your area– Bring...
What can PCCs do?2. Commission creatively– Maximise opportunities to joint commission withpartners and match funding aroun...
What can PCCs do?3. Consult with all those incontact with the criminaljustice system– Service user involvementimproves pol...
Thank youdominic.williamson@revolving-doors.org.ukshane.britton@revolving-doors.org.ukwww.revolving-doors.org.ukhttps://tw...
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Pcc presentation june 2013 dw

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Presentation delivered at the Assoication of Police and Crime Commissioners conference in Manchester 20 June 2013: Working with multiple and complex needs.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Pcc presentation june 2013 dw

  1. 1. Working with multiple andcomplex needsAlan Kilmister – member National Service User ForumShane Britton – policy officerDominic Williamson - chief executiveRevolving Doors Agency
  2. 2. Themes for today’s session– Understanding multiple and complex needs– What works– What can PCC’s do?By understanding and addressing people’s multipleneeds we can transform lives, reduce reoffending ,make communities safer and save money
  3. 3. What Revolving Doors is forOur mission is to change systems and improve services for peoplewith multiple and complex needs who are in contact with thecriminal justice system.We demonstrate and share evidence of effective interventionsand promote reform of public services through partnerships withnational and local political leaders, policy makers, commissionersand other experts and by involving people with direct experienceof the problem in all our work.
  4. 4. What Revolving Doors does:Development &partnershipsPolicy andcommunicationsService userinvolvement
  5. 5. An issue for PCCs• Repeated contactwith the police• Acquisitive crime andanti-social behaviour• Reoffending• Vulnerable adultsand repeat victims“A significant proportion of crime is committed by offenderswho have multiple problems” – Ministry of Justice - Breakingthe Cycle
  6. 6. Multiple and complex needs• Multiple problems including:o Poor mental healtho Substance misuseo Practical needs – housing, debt etco Family, relationships and social networkso Health and disabilityo Underlying emotional problems resulting from history of beingin care as a child, abuse, neglect, violence, bereavement,isolation and self harmo Behavioural and attitudinal problems, including angermanagement, hopelessness, institutionalisation, impulsivity.• Complex because these issues occur at once, and interact tocreate a cycle of crisis and crime and because services arepoor to respond.
  7. 7. Structural / environmentCommunityOpportunitiesQuality servicesPublic attitudesMediaMultiple needs: understand the dynamicSelf : MindResilienceCognitive abilityThoughts / emotionPerceptions /beliefsChildhoodContributionInvolvementLearningWorkBasic needsHousingMoneySafetyHealthMentalPhysicalTreatmentSocialFamilyLoveFriendsGroup identity
  8. 8. Multiple needs: negative dynamicStructural / environmentPovertyUnemploymentQuality of servicesDiscriminationStigmaNegative mediaSelf – MindMental / physical painNegative self imageChildhood traumaSubstance misuseContributionExclusionUnemploymentCrime - prisonBasic needsRent arrearsEvictionHomelessnessRough sleepingPovertyHealthCommon MHproblemsPoor physical healthNo contact with GPSocialFamily breakdownIsolationNegative peer groupsNo trustedrelationshipOutsider identity
  9. 9. The research literature also confirms what service users tell us:that when they have multiple needs people experience a poorerresponse from services• Complex Responses (2011) identified a number of negativeelements in their experience of frontline services• Driven byMismatch in expectationsPoor quality of staff-clientrelationshipFragmented Service responseComplexityDelayService exclusion/denialLimitedResourcesInadequate StaffedServicesStrategic PrioritisationInadequate Provision ofServices
  10. 10. Solutions - What Works?• ‘Someone on your side’ - A trusted relationship within a team• An assertive, persistent outreach and engagement• Tailored to individual’s needs, capabilities, gender and culture• Community based but linked to each stage of criminal justice system• Applies a holistic, psychosocial understanding of multiple and complexneeds, including impact of complex trauma• Flexible approach, responsive in crisis and relapse• Co-produced with service users, involving them at all levels• Draws on the experience of peers in recovery• Coordination of services, brokering access and creating integratedpathways especially treatment and housing• Supported by strategic stakeholders and commissioners• Gathers data to demonstrate impact, including cost benefits
  11. 11. Current context• Social Justice Strategy• Justice reforms – Rehabilitation strategy• Justice reinvestment• Community budgets• Troubled families programme• Greater integration – JSNAs, MOPAC etc• Big Lottery Fulfilling Lives programme• Deficit reduction and cuts to budgets
  12. 12. What can PCCs do?1. Strategic leadership2. Commission creatively3. Consult with all those incontact with the criminaljustice system
  13. 13. What can PCCs do?1. Strategic leadership– Create a strategy that drawstogether opportunities forchange in your area– Bring partners together,including health, offenderhealth commissioners, localauthorities and housing totackle shared issue– Build local data and evidencearound this problem– Make the most of local liaisonand diversion services
  14. 14. What can PCCs do?2. Commission creatively– Maximise opportunities to joint commission withpartners and match funding around shared issues– Contribute to community and pooled budgets in localareas, like Tri-Borough in London– Use capacity of VCSE – link with local networks andcommission services that focus on prevention, earlyintervention and diversion (where appropriate)– Ensure police officers have options when respondingto an incident
  15. 15. What can PCCs do?3. Consult with all those incontact with the criminaljustice system– Service user involvementimproves policy andservices, but also helpsindividuals involved in theirrecovery– Can use existing networksand VCSE organisationswith strong service userinvolvement in your area
  16. 16. Thank youdominic.williamson@revolving-doors.org.ukshane.britton@revolving-doors.org.ukwww.revolving-doors.org.ukhttps://twitter.com/RevDoors

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