The most common cause of peripheral neuropathy is  (A) lead intoxication  (B) diabetes mellitus  (C) uremia  (D) polyarter...
Enlargement of the peripheral nerves throughout their course from spinal cord and brainstem to the peripheral termination,...
A 60-year-old patient with diabetes developed a sensory neuropathy in both legs.  Her physician elected to confirm the dia...
A prominent feature of diabetic neuropathy that is NOT seen in other common neuropathies (e.g., Guillain-Barre syndrome, u...
The fundamental pathologic lesion of diabetes mellitus producing many complications is  (A) lymphocytic infiltration of th...
The long-term complications of diabetes mellitus are primarily the result of  (A) vascular disease  (B) increased suscepti...
The most common cause of death in diabetics relates most closely to the development of  (A) atherosclerosis  (B) amyloidos...
The most important long-term effects of diabetes mellitus result from involvement of  (A) hepatocytes  (B) renal tubules  ...
The most common cause of blindness in diabetes is  (A) retrolental fibroplasia  (B) cataracts  (C) optic nerve atrophy  (D...
Which of the following is the most characteristic renal lesion of diabetes mellitus?  (A) hyaline nodules in glomeruli  (B...
Meticulous control of blood glucose levels has been shown to be most beneficial in diabetic  (A) cardiomyopathy  (B) compl...
Effectiveness of an insulin therapy regimen for diabetes mellitus over a period of weeks can be determined by measuring  (...
A 54-year-old man has been followed in your clinic for 15 years for type 2 diabetes.  To date he has required therapy with...
A patient with diabetes mellitus presents to the Emergency Room.  She looks ill and has a blood glucose level of 800 mg/dL...
A 30-year-old patient presents with nephrotic syndrome.  Subsequently a renal biopsy demonstrates uniformly thickened peri...
A 40-year-old woman has had a chronic illness for 25 years, is partially blind, and now presents with nephrotic syndrome. ...
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board review - diabetic peripheral neuropathy.ppt

  1. 1. The most common cause of peripheral neuropathy is (A) lead intoxication (B) diabetes mellitus (C) uremia (D) polyarteritis nodosa
  2. 2. Enlargement of the peripheral nerves throughout their course from spinal cord and brainstem to the peripheral termination, sparing the dorsal root ganglia, is a description of (A) alcoholic neuropathy (B) Dejerine-Sottas disease (C) diabetes mellitus neuropathy (D) lead neuropathy
  3. 3. A 60-year-old patient with diabetes developed a sensory neuropathy in both legs. Her physician elected to confirm the diabetic neuropathy with a nerve biopsy. Which of the following findings would most likely be present in the biopsy and consistent with diabetic neuropathy? (A) apple-green birefringence (congo red stain) (B) lymphocytic infiltrate (C) onion bulbs (D) thickened blood vessels (E) Verocay bodies
  4. 4. A prominent feature of diabetic neuropathy that is NOT seen in other common neuropathies (e.g., Guillain-Barre syndrome, uremic neuropathy, alcoholic neuropathy) is involvement (A) limited to motor nerves (B) limited to sensory nerves with loss of sensation (C) limited to sensory nerves with pain and parasthesias (D) of autonomic nerves (E) of both motor and sensory nerves
  5. 5. The fundamental pathologic lesion of diabetes mellitus producing many complications is (A) lymphocytic infiltration of the pancreatic islets (B) necrotizing papillitis (C) nodular glomerulosclerosis (D) pyelonephritis (E) small vessel disease (microangiopathy)
  6. 6. The long-term complications of diabetes mellitus are primarily the result of (A) vascular disease (B) increased susceptibility to infection (C) altered serum osmolality (D) neurologic degeneration
  7. 7. The most common cause of death in diabetics relates most closely to the development of (A) atherosclerosis (B) amyloidosis (C) necrotizing papillitis (D) Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease (E) peripheral neuropathy
  8. 8. The most important long-term effects of diabetes mellitus result from involvement of (A) hepatocytes (B) renal tubules (C) neurons (D) blood vessels (E) pancreatic acinar cells
  9. 9. The most common cause of blindness in diabetes is (A) retrolental fibroplasia (B) cataracts (C) optic nerve atrophy (D) proliferative retinopathy
  10. 10. Which of the following is the most characteristic renal lesion of diabetes mellitus? (A) hyaline nodules in glomeruli (B) endothelial and mesangial hyperplasia (C) flattened basophilic epithelial cells (D) foot-process fusion (E) epithelial crescent formation
  11. 11. Meticulous control of blood glucose levels has been shown to be most beneficial in diabetic (A) cardiomyopathy (B) complications of pregnancy (C) glomerulosclerosis (D) microangiopathy (E) retinopathy
  12. 12. Effectiveness of an insulin therapy regimen for diabetes mellitus over a period of weeks can be determined by measuring (A) glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb A1C) (B) oral glucose tolerance (C) total serum cholesterol (D) two hour post prandial blood sugar level (E) urine ketone levels
  13. 13. A 54-year-old man has been followed in your clinic for 15 years for type 2 diabetes. To date he has required therapy with diet and oral insulin-releasing agents. Although he is only mildly hyperglycemic on his clinic visits at three month intervals, his glycosylated hemoglobin (A-1-C) level has become consistently elevated over the last 2 or 3 years. He is at greatest risk for which of the following complications of diabetes mellitus? (A) diffuse glomerulosclerosis (B) insulin-induced hypoglycemic coma (C) ketoacidosis (D) nonketotic hyperosmolar coma
  14. 14. A patient with diabetes mellitus presents to the Emergency Room. She looks ill and has a blood glucose level of 800 mg/dL. Her blood pressure is normal. Which of the following best describes her acid/base status? (A) metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap (B) metabolic alkalosis with an increased anion gap (C) partially compensated metabolic acidosis (D) partially compensated respiratory acidosis (E) respiratory acidosis
  15. 15. A 30-year-old patient presents with nephrotic syndrome. Subsequently a renal biopsy demonstrates uniformly thickened peripheral capillary basement membranes without electron dense deposits. This combination of findings suggests (A) amyloidosis (B) diabetes mellitus (C) focal sclerosing glomerulopathy (D) membranous glomerulonephritis (E) minimal change disease
  16. 16. A 40-year-old woman has had a chronic illness for 25 years, is partially blind, and now presents with nephrotic syndrome. She most likely has (A) Berger disease (B) membranous glomerulopathy (C) minimal change disease (D) nodular glomerulosclerosis (E) post-infectious glomerulonephritis

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