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VicHealth Innovation Challenge - Alcohol: Ideas Jam 2014

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Doing Something Good slides from VicHealth Innovation Challenge - Alcohol: Ideas Jam.

Doing Something Good are working with VicHealth to help those interested in taking on the Innovation Challenge Alcohol to develop their big ideas and build their capability to make a real impact.

The Innovation Challenge – Alcohol: Ideas Jam was a one day practical, outcomes-driven workshop for participants to:

> explore key trends and identify opportunities
> discover socially innovative initiatives and approaches already making a difference
> develop an understanding of the needs and motivations of your target audience
Rapid Prototyping
> help you develop their pitch and design a prototype
> learn about and apply the principles and practices of design thinking and Lean Startup to develop and test their idea

We covered the principles of developing innovative ideas with impact, and how to apply these processes to the development of ideas for the Innovation Challenge: Alcohol. Methodologies used included Design Thinking, Lean Startup and Rapid Prototyping.

Read more about the Ideas Jam at http://doingsomethinggood.com.au/vichealth-innovation-challenge-alcohol-ideas-jam/

Find out more about the VicHealth Innovation Challenge Alcohol at http://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/Programs-and-Projects/Alcohol-Misuse/Programs/Innovation-Challenge.aspx#.VGGMiFOUdqY

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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VicHealth Innovation Challenge - Alcohol: Ideas Jam 2014

  1. 1. VicHealth Innovation Challenge ALCOHOL #VHinnov IDEAS JAM
  2. 2. WELCOME Julian Waters-­‐Lynch DOING SOMETHING GOOD #VHinnov @jwaterslynch
  3. 3. welcome DAVID HOOD @DavidAHood JULIAN WATERS-­‐LYNCH @jwaterslynch join the conversa<on on twi=er with @VicHealth @DoingSomeGood #VHinnov doing something good
  4. 4. SCHEDULE morning a(ernoon 9:30 AM Welcome 1:20 PM Rapid Prototype Team Challenge 9:50 AM Shaping Good Ideas 2:10 PM Pitch Design 10:00 AM Understanding Context -­‐ includes review of Discovery & Insights Forum 2:25 PM AFTERNOON TEA 10:40 AM MORNING TEA 2:45 PM Pitch Delivery 11:00 AM Intro to Human-­‐centred Design 3:10 PM Intro to Lean Startup 11:15 AM GeVng to Know Your Audience 3:25 PM IdenYfying AssumpYons & Designing Lean Experiments 12:10 PM Engaging Your Target Audience 3:50 PM Wrap up & What’s Next 12:35 PM LUNCH 4:00 PM CLOSE
  5. 5. WELCOME David Hood DOING SOMETHING GOOD #VHinnov @DavidAHood
  6. 6. why the innovaCon challenge? VicHealth wants to see a be=er drinking culture in Victoria. One where people can say no to a drink when they feel like stopping, where drinking to get drunk isn’t seen as acceptable or normal. > Almost half (46%) of all Victorians drink in a way that increases their risk of injury, with this rising to two-­‐thirds (67%) for young people aged 16-­‐29. > Alcohol-­‐related harms requiring police or medical a=enRon appear to be increasing in Victoria, with hospitalisaRons involving alcohol up by 33% > Alcohol is one of the top 10 avoidable causes of disease and death in Victoria.
  7. 7. what is the innovaCon challenge? The VicHealth InnovaRon Challenge is looking for innovaRve ideas to help change this drinking culture by either: • Reducing the amount Victorians drink, parRcularly those who drink a lot, o[en, or; • Increasing the acceptability of saying no to a drink, or drinking a bit less. There’s a pool of up to $300,000 available in start up funding for bold new ideas to change the way Victorians drink.
  8. 8. creaCng the condiCons to spark great ideas
  9. 9. where do good ideas come from? “Chance favours the connected mind.” Steven B Johnson
  10. 10. http://dthsg.com/what-is-design-thinking/
  11. 11. “If I had an hour to solve a problem I'd spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and five minutes thinking about solu?ons.”
  12. 12. human-centred design
  13. 13. http://www.nitibhan.com/2013/01/reflections-on-design-thinking-for.html
  14. 14. http://uxthink.wordpress.com/2010/01/10/apple-design-proces/
  15. 15. creaCve jammin’ principles 1. Be present. Focus on what you’re doing right now and pay a=enRon to every aspect of what you’re doing: to your body, your senses, your thoughts. 2. Accept everything as an offer. Receive thoughts, ideas, quesRons or comments of others as a gi[. 3. There are no mistakes. Only invitaRons into a new level of creaRvity: breaking pa=erns and allowing new ones to emerge. 4. Make everyone else look good. You do not have to defend or jusRfy yourself or your posiRon -­‐ others will do that for you and you do that for others. 5. Be changed by what is said. Accept your reacRon as an opportunity to take a new or expanded perspecRve to inspire new ideas. 6. Keep the energy going. No ma=er what is given, or what happens, accept it and keep moving. 7. Serve the good of the whole. Always carry the quesRon, "How can I best serve this situaRon?" 8. Yes and ... Fully accept what is happening and what is being offered, and add a NEW piece of informaRon -­‐ that is what allows it to be adapRve, move forward and stay generaRve. Inspired by 7 Basic Improv Principles with thanks to Michelle James (crea<veemergence.com)
  16. 16. What brought you here?
  17. 17. What brought you here? What are you currently working on in relaRon to alcohol consumpRon?
  18. 18. shaping great ideas Start with why Why are you doing this? What is the situaRon you want to change and why is it important to change? What might change look like? What do you believe is possible? What is your preferred future? of the context 1 What is the current situaRon? Who does it impact? What is it’s impact Build your understanding on people, the planet, the economy? What are the possible causes? Observe. Listen. Learn. Enquire. IdenYfy your target audience Who are you designing your service or product for? Be specific. Who believe’s what you believe? It’s not everybody. audience 3 Seek to understand their needs and aspiraRons, what moRvates them Get to know your target and their challenges. Develop user personas and user journeys to provide valuable insights. IdenYfy the problem you are solving How does your idea help your target audience to get what they need or what they value? How does it help them to overcome challenges and barriers? Prototype and test ideas Gain insights into customers’ needs by designing and deploying the smallest amount of funcRonality possible (AKA your minimum viable product/service). Evolve the soluRon based on insights provided by engaged early adopters. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  19. 19. shaping great ideas Start with why Why are you doing this? What is the situaRon you want to change and why is it important to change? What might change look like? What do you believe is possible? What is your preferred future? of the context 1 What is the current situaRon? Who does it impact? What is it’s impact Build your understanding on people, the planet, the economy? What are the possible causes? Observe. Listen. Learn. Enquire. IdenYfy your target audience Who are you designing your service or product for? Be specific. Who believe’s what you believe? It’s not everybody. audience 3 Seek to understand their needs and aspiraRons, what moRvates them Get to know your target and their challenges. Develop user personas and user journeys to provide valuable insights. IdenYfy the problem you are solving How does your idea help your target audience to get what they need or what they value? How does it help them to overcome challenges and barriers? Prototype and test ideas Gain insights into customers’ needs by designing and deploying the smallest amount of funcRonality possible (AKA your minimum viable product/service). Evolve the soluRon based on insights provided by engaged early adopters. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  20. 20. START WITH WHY
  21. 21. People don’t buy what you do they buy why you do it. ~ Simon Sinek
  22. 22. Excessive alcohol consump?on creates mul?ple social and health problems for individuals and society, and is one of the top 10 avoidable causes of disease and death in Victoria.
  23. 23. The social cost of alcohol-­‐related harm in 2007–08 in Victoria was $4.3 billion. This includes direct costs associated with, for example, road accidents, health care, crime and violence, and indirect costs such as loss of workforce labour and for educa?on and research resources.
  24. 24. While most of us (78% of Australians) agree that we have a problem with alcohol, only 25% of drinkers believe that their drinking behaviour is cause for concern.
  25. 25. shaping great ideas Start with why Why are you doing this? What is the situaRon you want to change and why is it important to change? What might change look like? What do you believe is possible? What is your preferred future? of the context 1 What is the current situaRon? Who does it impact? What is it’s impact Build your understanding on people, the planet, the economy? What are the possible causes? Observe. Listen. Learn. Enquire. IdenYfy your target audience Who are you designing your service or product for? Be specific. Who believe’s what you believe? It’s not everybody. audience 3 Seek to understand their needs and aspiraRons, what moRvates them Get to know your target and their challenges. Develop user personas and user journeys to provide valuable insights. IdenYfy the problem you are solving How does your idea help your target audience to get what they need or what they value? How does it help them to overcome challenges and barriers? Prototype and test ideas Gain insights into customers’ needs by designing and deploying the smallest amount of funcRonality possible (AKA your minimum viable product/service). Evolve the soluRon based on insights provided by engaged early adopters. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  26. 26. what are VicHealth looking for? Ideas that address the following criteria: 1. Enable a beVer drinking culture: by geong heavy drinkers to drink a li=le less, or by increasing the acceptability of non and moderate drinking. 2. Point of difference: be clever, Rmely and unique. 3. Equity: reach the hard to reach and move the hard to move. 4. Scalability: able to be expanded, upscaled or transferred 5. Sustainability: will be able to stand on its own two feet. 6. Partners: recruited a project team that brings a unique perspecRve 7. Sharable: documented your project so we can share it online 8. Ready to roll!: must be able to test within 12 months
  27. 27. review vichealth innovation challenge: discovery & insights forum Alcohol
  28. 28. Alcohol in Australia: Key trends and recent developments Michael Livingston
  29. 29. Historical*consump/on*data* 14" 12" 10" 8" 6" 4" 2" 0" Alcohol" Spirits" Wine" Beer"
  30. 30. Consumption Risky drinking by young adults 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 18-24 year olds 25-29 year olds 2001 2004 2007 2010 2013
  31. 31. Consumption But... 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 18-24 year olds 25-29 year olds 40-49 year olds 50-59 year olds 60-69 year olds 2001 2004 2007 2010 2013
  32. 32. Harm trends Generally increasing harm rates over the past decade (although road injuries and deaths are steady) 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Hospital admissions Ambulance attendances Treatment episodes Assault Family incidents Emergency Department 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13
  33. 33. Conclusions Victorian and Australian alcohol trend data provides a confusing picture: - Reasonable evidence of harm increases – Generally stable levels of consumption, which obscure: • Major reductions in teenage drinking • Declines in risky drinking, particularly among young adults • Some slight increases in drinking among older people – Big shifts in attitudes towards alcohol Little evidence to explain these changes – Increased public health presence in media coverage of alcohol may be driving or reflecting changes in public attitudes
  34. 34. Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum Drinking Related Lifestyles Study Don’t Wag Your Finger At Me! Mike Reid, RMIT University Tony Worsley, Deakin University Francis Farrelly, RMIT University Tim Fry, RMIT University Lisa Farell, RMIT University Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum
  35. 35. Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum The spectrum of acceptable behaviour Typical Drinking normal behaviour Consumption of alcohol Abstaining extreme, odd & infrequent behaviour Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum Getting Drunk common practice Binge Drinking extreme & " “a youth issue” Acceptable behaviour Only abstinence from alcohol and binge drinking are seen as extreme behaviours
  36. 36. Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum The Initiator • Outgoing and the ‘life of the party’! • Loves to have a drink and let loose! • Drinks to have fun! • Gregarious and outgoing and loves to make things happen – often encourages others to drink! • Likes to be a source of information on alcohol brands, types of drinks and places to go out! The Protector Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum The Moderator ! The Follower • Fun, social and easy-going! • Influenced by social and cultural pressures! • Tends to join in and go with the flow! • Gets swept up in the moment and enjoyment of social situations Drinking Identities & Characteristics
  37. 37. Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum What drives the Initiators? Mavenism / Ego Seeking Self Enhancement Social expectations Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum Hedonism Brand loyalty Coping with Depression Easy access to alcohol Cheap Prices Building Confidence Question: How can I create fun without using Alcohol as a starting point?
  38. 38. Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum What drives the Followers? Achievement Values Cheap Prices Seeking Self Enhancement Mavenism / Ego Alcohol Discovery & Insights Forum Hedonism Easy access Brand loyalty Question: How can I join in but not be lead astray so easily?
  39. 39. Alcohol: Discovery and Insights Forum Acting Inspector Dale HUNTINGTON Melbourne East Local Area Commander
  40. 40. PRESENT: Large Crowds - Ticketed event – VRC Small numbers of drunk arrests- media / standards set by VRC / safe beverage containers- Licensee / Fosters-CUB/ other events Fights in the crowd- beverage purchasing management controls. Lack of organising security – expectations/duties – Full support by VRC - Vicpol Patron standards of behaviour - High - World event. Branding of Melbourne Liquor licensing Controls lax – Stringent bar and point of sale management structures / RSA officers / Nil BYO
  41. 41. Young adults in Melbourne talking about their ideal state of intoxication Sarah MacLean1&2 1 Centre for Heath Equity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 2 Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, Turning Point, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  42. 42. Most people monitored how they were feeling to assess how drunk they were • I get head spins and then like I feel like I’m gonna throw up. But I don’t throw up then, I just stop [drinking] (Kara, 19, female, high risk drinker). • I can sort of just see if I’m starting to feel a bit more tired. And then I’m like ‘Nah there’s no point’. I’m not really enjoying [drinking] anymore so …that’s it (Dragan, 22 male, HRD). • Sometimes the taste, the taste kind of gets to me … The taste starts tasting a bit funny for me. So yeah, I go ‘Oh shit, I’ve drunk too much now’ (Paul, 23 male).
  43. 43. Image&machines.& & Interplay&between&people,&devices,&cultural&spaces&and&digital& networks.&& & Nicholas&Carah,&University&of&Queensland.& @nnniccc& n.carah@uq.edu.au&
  44. 44. Algorithm.& AcCvaCon.& Cultural&intermediary.& Gender&and&idenCty.&
  45. 45. VicHealth Innovation Challenge Using legislation to change behaviour: What more is needed? Liquor Licensing in Victoria Ms Paula O’Brien, Melbourne Law School 21 October 2014
  46. 46. CHANGING THE WAY WE SELL ALCOHOL TO MINIMISE ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM
  47. 47. !!!!!!! Social'Marke,ng'Approaches' ' Alcohol!Culture!Change!Project! ! !!! Sarah'Saunders' VicHealth'Campaigns'Manager' 20'October'2014'
  48. 48. No'Excuse'Needed'Campaign'
  49. 49. GIVE THEM LOLLIPOPS
  50. 50. Healthy clubs. Strong communities. Good$Sports$ Innova&on'Challenge:'Alcohol' Discovery'and'Insights'Forum'' ' 20'October'2014! Community programs ! Mark'Stone' Project(Officer(–(Good(Sports( Bill'Karametos' Victoria(Regional(Manager(–(Good(Sports( (
  51. 51. Community programs !!!!!!!!!!!!13
  52. 52. + =
  53. 53. Framing Kings Cross as a music festival
  54. 54. my Hello Sunday Morning experience! Nicole!Cliff!
  55. 55. Open Space Session topics included: • designing a campaign for drinking in moderaRon • a Human-­‐centred Design approach to influencing behaviour • social markeRng and behaviour change alcohol educaRon programs • how brands design spaces to influence behaviour • developing a parenRng pack to educate kids about the risks of drinking
  56. 56. your IDEA?
  57. 57. designing for the future
  58. 58. WORLD CAFÉ
  59. 59. WORLD CAFÉ Think about behaviour change iniRaRves that have helped influence our culture for the be=er.
  60. 60. WORLD CAFÉ Think about behaviour change iniRaRves that have helped influence our culture for the be=er. 1. Which ones were your favourite? 2. What were the qualiRes or characterisRcs you liked about it? Why?
  61. 61. MORNING TEA
  62. 62. human-centred design
  63. 63. http://www.nitibhan.com/2013/01/reflections-on-design-thinking-for.html
  64. 64. https://dschool.stanford.edu/
  65. 65. the five phases of design thinking http://thinkingofdesign.blogspot.com.au/
  66. 66. http://uxthink.wordpress.com/2010/01/10/apple-design-proces/
  67. 67. http://hci.stanford.edu/dschool/resources/design-process/readable.html
  68. 68. design thinking Getting to know your audience
  69. 69. “Understanding what drives binge drinking is important, but arguably just as crucial is understanding the deeper rela?onship Victorians have with alcohol. The public discussion about alcohol needs to be inclusive, realis?c, empathe?c and relevant to a broad audience.”
  70. 70. Within the present cultural context, drinking less appears to be difficult for most people to do. There are very few effec?ve incen?ves for individuals to opt for a more moderate approach toward alcohol. Ra?onally, many are able to see the benefits of drinking less, such as improved health, more money and greater produc?vity at work. Yet the promise of these benefits does liXle to reduce drinking. A key factor undermining the power of these incen?ves to drink less is the lack of socially acceptable ‘excuses’ to drink less.
  71. 71. Our society’s inherent and deeply embedded drinking culture makes most people feel they need a specific reason not to drink, rather than a reason to drink. People need to be armed with a specific reason for not drinking, or for drinking less, when out with friends. Unfortunately, only a few reasons, such as a medical condi?on, pregnancy or driving, are socially accepted.
  72. 72. Presently, liXle or no posi?ve reinforcement (or culturally accepted alterna?ve to alcohol) exists for those who decide not to drink or want to drink less. Modifying drinking behaviour is hard because our society and culture provide individuals with very few ‘tools’ and strategies to enable this behavioural change. Fundraising events such as Febfast, Dry July and Ocsober, and innova?ons such as Hello Sunday Morning and Say When, encourage people to learn more about their drinking, and they support changes to drinking behaviours.
  73. 73. The research suggests an opportunity to promote and build on these, and to develop alterna?ves to drinking that are relevant, realis?c and acknowledge the present culture of drinking in Victoria.
  74. 74. Empathy is not just about walking in another's shoes. First you must remove your own.
  75. 75. what are personas? Personas are ficRonal representaRons of your target audience that help you to understand them be=er. Well thought out and well researched personas make it easier for you to design and deliver services that meet your target audience’s specific needs and expectaRons, while addressing their unique challenges and communicaRng in their language. The strongest personas are based on market research in combinaRon with insights gathered through conversaRons, surveys and interviews with your target audience.
  76. 76. developing user personas •To ensure your personas are accurate representaRons of your users and have the support of your stakeholders throughout the process, you should: •Conduct user research: Answer the following quesRons: Who are your users and why are they using the system? What behaviors, assumpRons, and expectaRons color their view of the system? •Condense the research: Look for themes/characterisRcs that are specific, relevant, and universal to the system and its users. •Brainstorm: Organize elements into persona groups that represent your target users. Name or classify each group. •Refine: Combine and prioriRze the rough personas. Separate them into primary, secondary, and, if necessary, complementary categories. You should have roughly 3-­‐5 personas and their idenRfied characterisRcs. •Make them realisRc: Develop the appropriate descripRons of each personas background, moRvaRons, and expectaRons. Do not include a lot of personal informaRon. Be relevant and serious; humor is not appropriate.
  77. 77. Market Segment Name Gender Age Nationality Location Relationship Status Children Employer Position Income Background Routine & Behaviour Goals & Motivations Challenges & Constraints Ideal Experience Persona Creator powered by UsabilityTools 1
  78. 78. What’s their history in relaRonship to drinking? Who and what has shaped their current behaviour? What’s their rouRne in relaRon to socialising and drinking? Daily, weekly, monthly, annually? What are their personal goals around health, wellbeing and happiness? What moRvates them? What are the challenges they face to changing their drinking behaviour? What are the constraints/barriers? What sort of experience are they looking for? What sort of interacRon do they want to have with others/you? What sort of thing might you expect them to say about their ideal experience and why they love it?
  79. 79. EMPATHY MAP Persona: Scenario: How do I feel? What do I think? What do I see? What do I hear? What do I say and do? Pain Gain Fears | Frustrations | Obstacles Wants/Needs | Measures of Success
  80. 80. EMPATHY MAP How do I feel? What do I see? What do I hear? What do I say and do? Pain Gain Fears | FrustraRons | Obstacles Wants/Needs | Measures of Success Persona: Angela Schwindt (Sidelined Sporster)
  81. 81. SCENARIO Persona: Scenario: getting ready arrive depart fall asleep POINT OF DECISION ENABLING CONDITION POTENTIALH URDLE
  82. 82. “The key is help them take baby steps” grind it out tiny habits http://www.behaviormodel.org/
  83. 83. tiny habit Formula A[er I [exis?ng habit] I will [new ?ny behaviour] And then [celebrate] http://tinyhabits.com/
  84. 84. COMMUNICATIONS & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
  85. 85. start with ‘why’
  86. 86. People don’t buy what you do they buy why you do it. ~ Simon Sinek
  87. 87. ‣ why: belief, moRvaRon or purpose ‣ how: experience or process ‣ what: details of product of service
  88. 88. the opportunity • raise awareness of issue • build profile of organisaRon or project • engage community • a=ract supporters • a=ract funding • crowd-­‐source content and ideas • find allies • engage influencers • build networks • collaborate • coordinate collecRve acRon • scale impact
  89. 89. developing an integrated strategy Social Media Strategy OrganisaYonal Strategy Alignment of: •Vision •Mission •ObjecRves CommunicaCons Strategy
  90. 90. what goes in to a good strategy? 1. An inspiring Vision statement 2. An engaging Mission statement. 3. Having clear objecRves. Make them SMART. 4. Knowing who your target audience is and understanding what they value. 5. Knowing where your target audience is (which channels they are on). 6. Clear and consistent messaging.
  91. 91. what’s your strategy? 1. What is your organisaRon’s Vision? What does the world look like if you’re successful? How does it reflect what you believe? How does it include others -­‐ will your target audience and other organisa?ons want to help you achieve it? (This is the ‘why’.) 2. What is your organisaRon’s Mission? How are you working toward your Vision? What do you offer? What problem are you solving with your work, and who are you solving it for?
  92. 92. vision statements Kiva: We envision a world where all people – even in the most remote areas of the globe – hold the power to create opportunity for themselves and others. (26) Save the Children: Our vision is a world in which every child a=ains the right to survival, protecRon, development and parRcipaRon. (18) Goodwill: Every person has the opportunity to achieve his/her fullest potenRal and parRcipate in and contribute to all aspects of life. (21) Teach for America: One day, all children in this naRon will have the opportunity to a=ain an excellent educaRon. (16) Make-­‐A-­‐Wish: Our vision is that people everywhere will share the power of a wish (13)
  93. 93. mission statements Special Olympics: To transform communiRes by inspiring people throughout the world to open their minds, accept and include people with intellectual disabiliRes and thereby anyone who is perceived as different.
  94. 94. belief/theory of change charity: water believes that we can end the water crisis in our lifeRme by ensuring that every person on the planet has access to life’s most basic need — clean drinking water.
  95. 95. what’s your strategy? 3. What are your objecRves? Make them SMART -­‐ Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Time-­‐bound! Develop 3-­‐5 clear objec?ves for each of your strategies -­‐ organisa?onal, communica?ons and social media. 4. Who's your audience? Be more specific than people of a specific gender or age, in a par?cular loca?on or profession, or with certain interests. Think psychographics profiles rather than just demographic. What do your audience value (ends values)? What are they talking about? What are they searching for? Consider developing personas.
  96. 96. what’s your strategy? 5. Where are your target audience? Which channels are they on and why? Where are they most likely to get value from interac?ng with you? 6. What acRons (have mulRple) can they take with you? What's in it for them? Think about what they value. Just because it's compelling for you doesn't mean it will inspire them to ac?on. How does the ac?on help us to move toward a shared vision and how is does it reflect their values and aspira?ons? Frame as an invita?on. eg. “Join us…”
  97. 97. what’s your strategy? 7.What are your key messages? 1.Why is this issue important? Highlight with memorable and repeatable facts, figures and metaphors. (Wrap them up in personal stories and a broader narra?ve that reflects your vision and values.) 2.What ac?on are you invi?ng people to take? How will it contribute toward your vision and objec?ves? This should be included in EVERY piece of communica?on.
  98. 98. MESSAGING
  99. 99. KEY MESSAGES • come up with three top line messages: • the current situaRon and it’s impact • your belief that it can change and how • call to acRon for people to take • have up to three supporRng messages • keep them simple • use language that the audience understands and listens/ looks out for
  100. 100. KEY MESSAGES • do you have any killer facts and figures? • do you have an anecdote or story? • are there any metaphors or analogies you can use? • do you have any images you can use?
  101. 101. MESSAGING The Why: 1. What’s the need? What’s the current situaRon and its impact. -­‐> Do you have a killer fact? 2. What do you believe? What is the vision you’re working toward? What supporRng evidence do you have that this is possible? -­‐ Either research or an example.
  102. 102. MESSAGING The How: 3. What exactly are you doing to work toward your Vision? i.e. your Mission. 4. What are the results or impact you’re seeing and experiencing from your work (or of others doing similar work)? 5. Use a story or metaphor to illustrate what you’re doing and its impact.
  103. 103. MESSAGING The What: 6. What acRon/s are you inviRng people to take? How can their acRon/contribuRon/parRcipaRon help you work toward your vision?
  104. 104. FINDABLE
  105. 105. SHAREABLE
  106. 106. MEASURABLE
  107. 107. MANAGEABLE
  108. 108. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing
  109. 109. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy
  110. 110. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose
  111. 111. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves
  112. 112. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves 2. IdenRfy your target audience
  113. 113. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves 2. IdenRfy your target audience 3. Decide on the best channels for you
  114. 114. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves 2. IdenRfy your target audience 3. Decide on the best channels for you 4. Be clear with your messaging
  115. 115. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves 2. IdenRfy your target audience 3. Decide on the best channels for you 4. Be clear with your messaging 3. Create a content plan
  116. 116. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves 2. IdenRfy your target audience 3. Decide on the best channels for you 4. Be clear with your messaging 3. Create a content plan 4. Develop systems for content curaRon, producRon & posRng
  117. 117. steps to success with social media 1. Watch and learn from those who know what they’re doing 2. Develop an integrated strategy 1. Be clear about your purpose and objecRves 2. IdenRfy your target audience 3. Decide on the best channels for you 4. Be clear with your messaging 3. Create a content plan 4. Develop systems for content curaRon, producRon & posRng 5. Do and Review (and keep learning)
  118. 118. LUNCH
  119. 119. rapid prototyping
  120. 120. developing prototypes A prototype is: • a simple simulaRon of the experience of a new product or service that a user can interact with • a mockup that makes an idea tangible and real Prototyping: • serves to provide specificaRons for a real, working system rather than a theoreRcal one • provides a way to help surface quesRons about the desirability, usability, and feasibility of your idea • helps to spot problems • allows designers to fail early (rather than a product or service to fail later) • saves money and Rme
  121. 121. Iteratively making and testing a series of prototypes can help you gain a deeper understanding of your users and help you refine your solutions.
  122. 122. why rapid prototyping? • design and test concepts (MVP) quickly and effecRvely • taps into knowledge, skills and insights of whole team and larger groups • builds capability to work openly and collaboraRvely • forces creaRvity with constraints • straigh|orward • dynamic • fun
  123. 123. rapid PROTOTYPing 1ST DESIGN Start with the basics 1ST TEST Test your concept with others 2ND DESIGN Refine your concept 2ND TEST Test your final concept 15 min 10 min 10 min 10 min 10 min pitch design Prepare your pitch Workshop design inspired by the good work of Pete Williams (@rexster) and team, Deloi=e Centre for The Edge (@c4Edge), Melbourne
  124. 124. how might we get more victorians to adopt less harmful drinking habits?
  125. 125. the design challenge • How might we challenge social acceptability of drinking to excess? • How might we focus on the cultural posiRves of moderate (e.g. enjoying every moment) drinking rather than the negaRve (e.g. missing out)? • How might we challenge social pressures that make others drink? • How might we support people who want to drink less?
  126. 126. applying for the innovaCon challenge? Think about: 1. How will your idea prevent harm from alcohol? 2. How is it different to anything else out there? 3. How are you taking advantage of market trends? 4. Who will you recruit to be on your project team? 5. How will your project be sustainable in Rme?
  127. 127. rapid PROTOTYPing 1ST DESIGN Start with the basics 1ST TEST Test your concept with others 2ND DESIGN Refine your concept 2ND TEST Test your final concept 15 min 10 min 10 min 10 min 10 min pitch design Prepare your pitch Workshop design inspired by the good work of Pete Williams (@rexster) and team, Deloi=e Centre for The Edge (@c4Edge), Melbourne
  128. 128. round one: design 15 min 1. KEEP IT SIMPLE 2. You don’t have to think of everything. 3. Focus on your market segment and the insights from your persona. 4. What problem are you solving for them and what value is your idea to them. 5. Be able to explain your idea quickly and simply. 6. Assign roles. Who’s the scribe? The designer? The user? 7. Test internally as you go…
  129. 129. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  130. 130. round one: test 10 min 1. You have 10 minutes to explain your idea to members of other teams. 2. Your team mates will split up and go to other tables and hear about the idea they’ve come up with. Things to consider: 1. Is the idea engaging? Can you see where it would create value for the target audience? 2. Is it easy to get? What was hard to understand? 3. What smart things have other teams done that you can steal?
  131. 131. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  132. 132. round two: design 10 min 1. Incorporate feedback and ideas from people who came to your table. Share it with your team mates. 2. Incorporate what your team mates have learned from other teams. 3. Start to refine and develop different elements of your idea. How do people access your product or service? How do they find out about it? How does your persona feel when they use it? What do they love about it?
  133. 133. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  134. 134. round two: test 10 min 1. You have another 10 minutes to explain your idea to members of other teams. 2. Your team mates will split up again and go to other tables and see how other the team’s ideas have developed. Things to consider: 1. How will your idea prevent harm from alcohol? 2. How is it different to anything else out there? 3. How are they taking advantage of market trends? 4. How will this project be sustainable in Rme?
  135. 135. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  136. 136. the pitch
  137. 137. pitch design 10 1. Your pitch is allowed to be up to 2 minutes long. 2. Decide on a name for your product/service/ campaign. 3. IdenRfy the problem you’re solving. 4. IdenRfy your target audience and the value you’re creaRng for them (why they’re going to love it). 5. Explain how it works -­‐ your target audience and other key stakeholders need to understand. 6. Decide on the format. A standard sales pitch, a demonstraRon or a story board of your user journey? min
  138. 138. what makes a great pitch? 1. Start with why. 1. What’s the problem you’re solving.? 2. Why is it important? 3. What’s the impact? Use memorable facts, figures, anecdotes and metaphors. 2. What’s your soluRon? 3. Who’s your audience? 4. What do they value? 5. How is your idea different from others out there?
  139. 139. what makes a great pitch? 6. Who are you partnering with? 7. What are you building on that already exists? 8. Where are you in the stage of implemenRng your idea? 9. What do you need to take the next step? 10. How can we help you get there? What would you like us to do? 11. Share your passion. 12. Finish with your tagline.
  140. 140. what’s your elevator pitch?
  141. 141. the 30 second pitch [We/my organisation/project] is developing a [defined offering] to help [target audience] to [solve a problem] with [secret sauce]. http://techcrunch.com/2010/11/03/madlibs-pitch-adeo-ressi-founder-institute/
  142. 142. AFTERNOON TEA
  143. 143. the pitch
  144. 144. "Lean Startup" is a system for developing a business, product or service in the most efficient way possible to reduce the risk of failure. It is an approach that treats all ideas as having assumpRons (or hypotheses) that must be validated by rapid experimentaRon in the marketplace. The approach relies on scienRfic experimentaRon, iteraRve product releases, and customers feedback to generate validated learning.
  145. 145. The key is to idenRfy assumpRons -­‐ would people actually buy or do this? Not by building the whole product, but by building a Minimum Viable Product (MVP). The MVP is the most basic version of your product that is valuable to your user, that will enable you to test and learn.
  146. 146. 1. LANDING PAGE
  147. 147. designing your MVP
  148. 148. 2. A BLOG POST
  149. 149. 3. EMAIL
  150. 150. 4. SURVEYS
  151. 151. 3. BASIC PROTOTYPE
  152. 152. 5. EXPLAINER VIDEOS
  153. 153. 6. BASIC PROTOTYPE
  154. 154. 7. WIZARD OF OZ
  155. 155. 8. CONCIERGE
  156. 156. 9. PIECEMEAL
  157. 157. 10. CROWDFUNDING
  158. 158. “By the ?me that product is ready to be distributed widely, it will already have established customers.”
  159. 159. BMC Iteration Assumption Testing Experiment Design Hypothesis Participants Approach & Activities Expected Data & Actual Data Learning Goals & Outcomes Decision Lean Startup Experiments
  160. 160. What are your assumpCons?
  161. 161. What experiments could you do to test your assumpCons?
  162. 162. Assumption Testing Experiment Design Hypothesis Participants Approach & Activities Expected Data & Actual Data Learning Goals & Outcomes Decision
  163. 163. what are VicHealth looking for? Ideas that address the following criteria: 1. Enable a beVer drinking culture: by geong heavy drinkers to drink a li=le less, or by increasing the acceptability of non and moderate drinking. 2. Point of difference: be clever, Rmely and unique. 3. Equity: reach the hard to reach and move the hard to move. 4. Scalability: able to be expanded, upscaled or transferred 5. Sustainability: will be able to stand on its own two feet. 6. Partners: recruited a project team that brings a unique perspecRve 7. Sharable: documented your project so we can share it online 8. Ready to roll!: must be able to test within 12 months
  164. 164. applying for the innovaCon challenge Think about: 1. How will your idea prevent harm from alcohol? 2. How is it different to anything else out there? 3. How are you taking advantage of market trends? 4. Who will you recruit to be on your project team? 5. How will your project be sustainable in Rme?
  165. 165. applying for the innovaCon challenge Stage 1: Produce and submit your video pitch Two minute pitch videos to be submi=ed by Friday 21 November. Videos will be reviewed by a VicHealth shortlisRng commi=ee. Stage 2: Shortlisted pitches will develop a business plan Pitches to be shortlisted (week of) Monday 24 November. If your idea is shortlisted, you will be asked to develop a simple business plan to explore your idea in more detail (week of) Monday 1 December. Stage 3: Present to an Assessment Panel Shortlisted applicants will then be invited to present to an assessment panel on Monday 12 January 2015. http://challenge.vichealth.vic.gov.au/about.html
  166. 166. applying for the innovaCon challenge • Don’t worry about the quality of your video, VicHealth will be assessing the quality of the idea, not the quality of the footage. • VicHealth do not expect you to develop professional quality videos. Make it cheap and cheerful. Just talk to a camera. You can even record yourself on your smart phone! challenge.vichealth.vic.gov.au
  167. 167. thank you DAVID HOOD @DavidAHood JULIAN WATERS-­‐LYNCH @jwaterslynch join the conversa<on on twi=er with @VicHealth @DoingSomeGood #VHinnov doing something good

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