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VicHealth Physical Actitivy Innovation Challenge Rapid Prototype Workshop slides

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Our slides from the Rapid Prototype with VicHealth Tue 12 August 2014. Participants included representatives from sporting clubs and associations, health and fitness professionals, policy makers, entrepreneurs and change makers. The Rapid Prototype Workshop was the second of a two-part workshop series to build capability in the sector to generate and implement innovative ideas to get Victorians active, and to help applicants for the VicHealth Innovation Challenge to develop their ideas to get the inactive active and reach the hard to reach. Participants were led through a human-centred design approach, developed personas and prototyped concepts for programs, services and campaigns. Learn more about the VicHealth Innovation Challenge here: http://challenge.vichealth.vic.gov.au/

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VicHealth Physical Actitivy Innovation Challenge Rapid Prototype Workshop slides

  1. 1. designing & testing ideas to GET MORE VICTORIANS ACTIVE rapid PROTOTYPE WORKSHOP #VHinnov
  2. 2. welcome join the conversation on twitter with @VicHealth @DoingSomeGood #VHinnov DAVID HOOD @DavidAHood JULIAN WATERS-LYNCH @jwaterslynch doingsomething good
  3. 3. why the innovation challenge? Less than a third of Australians get enough physical activity every day. While many of us play traditional club sport to keep active, it’s not the answer for everybody. Recent trends show that participation is shifting. People are gravitating towards individual and fitness- based sports. Lifestyle, adventure and alternative sports are on the increase and people are choosing to participate in activities such as jogging, aerobics, cycling, group fitness training, fun runs and even military obstacle courses! More and more people are looking for flexible, social and less structured ways to get active. So, let’s give it to them!
  4. 4. what is the innovation challenge? The VicHealth is looking for new ideas to get more Victorians physically active. We’re challenging you to take sport and physical activity in a new direction. You could share in a pool of $400,000 in start-up funding to test your big idea and make a big impact. challenge.vichealth.vic.gov.au
  5. 5. what are VicHealth looking for? Ideas that address the following criteria: 1. Get more people physically active 2. Point of difference: be clever, timely and unique. 3. Equity: reach the hard to reach and move the hard to move. 4. Scalability: able to be expanded, upscaled or transferred 5. Sustainability: will be able to stand on its own two feet. 6. Partners: recruited a project team that brings a unique perspective 7. Sharable: documented your project so we can share it online 8. Ready to roll!: must be able to test within 12 months
  6. 6. FUTURES JAMThe future of sport & physical activity: Understanding trends & market opportunities #VHinnov review
  7. 7. shaping great ideas Start with why Why are you doing this? What do you believe you can change? What do you believe you can make different/better/easier? What do you believe is possible? Build your understanding of the context 1 What is the current situation? Who does it impact? What is it’s impact on people, the planet, the economy? What are the possible causes? Observe. Listen. Learn. Enquire. Identify your target audience Who are you designing your service or product for? Be specific. Who believe’s what you believe? It’s not everybody. Get to know your target audience 3 Seek to understand their needs and aspirations, what motivates them and their challenges. Develop user personas and user journeys to provide valuable insights. Identify the problem you are solving How does your idea help your target audience to get what they need or what they value? How does it help them to overcome challenges and barriers? Prototype and test ideas Gain insights into customers’ needs by designing and deploying the smallest amount of functionality possible (AKA your minimum viable product/service). Evolve the solution based on insights provided by engaged early adopters. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  8. 8. human-centred design
  9. 9. why use a human-centred design approach? “Because it can help your organization connect better with the people you serve. It can transform data into actionable ideas. It can help you to see new opportunities. It can help to increase the speed and effectiveness of creating new solutions.” ! http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit/
  10. 10. a look into the future
  11. 11. THE FUTURE OF AUSTRALIAN SPORT SIX MEGATRENDS SHAPING THE SPORTS SECTOR
  12. 12. trends: themes & drivers TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION TRIBES & TRUST EXPERIENCE now
  13. 13. MARKET SEGMENTATION STUDY AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION
  14. 14. design thinkinggrowing understanding & Gaining insightswith personas
  15. 15. lightning TALKS
  16. 16. 18
  17. 17. 19
  18. 18. games & gamification for health & fitness
  19. 19. Health  &  fitness  tracking  app   +   Wearable  Technology   +   Health  &  Fitness  training  &  advice   =  BodyWise Bodywiseapp.com   @MrMikeHalligan   @BodyWiseApp
  20. 20. 22
  21. 21. "Lean Startup" is a system for developing a business, product or service in the most efficient way possible to reduce the risk of failure. It is an approach that treats all ideas as having assumptions (or hypotheses) that must be validated by rapid experimentation in the marketplace. The approach relies on scientific experimentation, iterative product releases, and customers feedback to generate validated learning.
  22. 22. The key is to identify assumptions - would people actually buy or do this? Not by building the whole product, but by building a Minimum Viable Product (MVP). One of the most important of these hypotheses is always: what will the customer care about?
  23. 23. shaping great ideas Start with why Why are you doing this? What do you believe you can change? What do you believe you can make different/better/easier? What do you believe is possible? Build your understanding of the context 1 What is the current situation? Who does it impact? What is it’s impact on people, the planet, the economy? What are the possible causes? Observe. Listen. Learn. Enquire. Identify your target audience Who are you designing your service or product for? Be specific. Who believe’s what you believe? It’s not everybody. Get to know your target audience 3 Seek to understand their needs and aspirations, what motivates them and their challenges. Develop user personas and user journeys to provide valuable insights. Identify the problem you are solving How does your idea help your target audience to get what they need or what they value? How does it help them to overcome challenges and barriers? Prototype and test ideas Gain insights into customers’ needs by designing and deploying the smallest amount of functionality possible (AKA your minimum viable product/service). Evolve the solution based on insights provided by engaged early adopters. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  24. 24. 1. Be present.
 Focus on what you’re doing right now and pay attention to every aspect of what you’re doing: to your body, your senses, your thoughts. 2. Accept everything as an offer.
 Receive thoughts, ideas, questions or comments of others as a gift. 3. There are no mistakes.
 Only invitations into a new level of creativity: breaking patterns and allowing new ones to emerge. 4. Make everyone else look good. 
 You do not have to defend or justify yourself or your position - others will do that for you and you do that for others. 5. Be changed by what is said.
 Accept your reaction as an opportunity to take a new or expanded perspective to inspire new ideas. 6. Keep the energy going.
 No matter what is given, or what happens, accept it and keep moving. 7. Serve the good of the whole.
 Always carry the question, "How can I best serve this situation?" 8. Yes and ... 
 Fully accept what is happening and what is being offered, and add a NEW piece of information - that is what allows it to be adaptive, move forward and stay generative. Inspired by 7 Basic Improv Principles with thanks to Michelle James (creativeemergence.com) creative jammin’ principles
  25. 25. http://dthsg.com/what-is-design-thinking/
  26. 26. the five phases of design thinking http://thinkingofdesign.blogspot.com.au/
  27. 27. http://hci.stanford.edu/dschool/resources/design-process/readable.html
  28. 28. “If I had an hour to solve a problem I'd spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and five minutes thinking about solutions.”
  29. 29. Empathyis not just about walking
 in another's shoes. ! First you must remove your own.
  30. 30. Club Wary
  31. 31. Ponderers (Adults)
  32. 32. Sidelined
 Sportsters
  33. 33. Ponderers (Children)
  34. 34. Thrifty
 Enthusiasts
  35. 35. EMPATHY MAP What am I seeing? What am I saying & doing? What am I hearing? How am I thinking & feeling? Pain Gain Fears | Frustrations | Obstacles Wants/Needs | Measures of Success Persona: http://www.gamestorming.com/core-games/empathy-mapping/
  36. 36. EMPATHY MAP What do I see? What do I say and do? What do I hear? How do I feel? Pain Gain Fears | Frustrations | Obstacles Wants/Needs | Measures of Success Persona:AngelaSchwindt(SidelinedSporster)
  37. 37. where do you have space in your day?
  38. 38. I do… Morning Noon Evening Night A day in the life of: Activity Opportunity
  39. 39. I do… Activity Opportunity Morning Noon Evening Night A day in the life of: Angela Schwindt (Sidelined Sporster)
  40. 40. grind it out tiny habits “The key is help them take baby steps” http://www.behaviormodel.org/
  41. 41. After I [existing habit] I will [new tiny behaviour] And then [celebrate] tiny habit Formula http://tinyhabits.com/
  42. 42. THE FUTURE OF AUSTRALIAN SPORT SIX MEGATRENDS SHAPING THE SPORTS SECTOR Probable Plausible Preferable Possible
  43. 43. “The more people are locked into committed & contracted activities the more time fragmented they become. Consequently they seek, often serendipitous, opportunities to play or watch sport that fit into a busy schedule.”
  44. 44. 1. A PERFECT FIT Participation rates in aerobics, running, walking, along with gym membership, have all risen sharply over the past decade while participation rates for many organised sports have held constant or declined. People are increasingly playing sport to get fit, rather than getting fit to play sport. For such people the notion of winning is changing. They are more concerned with beating a personal time or fitness target than beating a competitor.
  45. 45. “Adventure sports provide people with an opportunity to break free”
  46. 46. The rise of lifestyle, adventure and alternative sports which are particularly popular with younger generations. These sports typically involve complex, advanced skills and have some element of inherent danger and/or thrill seeking. They are also characterised by a strong lifestyle element and participants often obtain cultural self-identity and self- expression through these sports. These sports are likely to attract participants through generational change and greater awareness via online content (e.g. YouTube, Facebook, Twitter). There is strong viewer demand for extreme sports videos on the internet and television. These sports are also finding their way into the Olympic Games with the most recent addition being BMX cycling introduced at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. International associations for skateboarding and rock climbing are making substantial efforts to have these included as Olympic sports in the future. 2. FROM EXTREME TO MAINSTREAM
  47. 47. “The Homeless World Cup really changed my life and introduced me to a whole new culture and whole new world.”
  48. 48. The broader benefits of sport are being increasingly recognised by governments, companies and communities. Sport can help achieve mental and physical health, crime prevention, social development and international cooperation objectives. Sport for children and adults is an effective means of helping to reduce the rising rates of obesity and chronic illness. If managed appropriately, it can be an effective mechanism to help achieve social inclusion for marginalised groups and reduce crime rates. Sport can also build bridges to other countries and achieve overseas aid, peace, development and foreign policy objectives. 3. MORE THAN JUST SPORT
  49. 49. “It's not the disability that defines you; its how you deal with the challenges the disability presents you with. We have an obligation to the abilities we DO have, not the disability”
  50. 50. Currently 14% of Australians are over 65. This is forecast to reach 25% by 2056. ! 18.5% of Australians have a disability and 52% of people over 60 have a disability. ! 25% of Australians are foreign-born and Australia will become more multicultural in the future. Different cultures have different sporting preferences and recreation habits. ! This will change the types of sports we play and how we play them. To retain strong participation rates, sports of the future will need to cater for senior citizens. 4. EVERYBODY’S GAME
  51. 51. rapid prototyping
  52. 52. developing prototypes A prototype is: • a simple simulation of the experience of a new product or service that a user can interact with • a mockup that makes an idea tangible and real Prototyping: • serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one • provides a way to help surface questions about the desirability, usability, and feasibility of your idea • helps to spot problems • allows designers to fail early (rather than a product or service to fail later) • saves money and tim
  53. 53. Iteratively making and testing a series of prototypes can help you gain a deeper understanding of your users and help you refine your solutions.
  54. 54. why rapid prototyping? • design and test concepts (MVP) quickly and effectively • taps into knowledge, skills and insights of whole team and larger groups • builds capability to work openly and collaboratively • forces creativity with constraints • straightforward • dynamic • fun
  55. 55. rapid PROTOTYPing 1ST DESIGN Start with the basics 1ST TEST Test your concept with others 2ND DESIGN Refine your concept 2ND TEST Test your final concept 15 min 10 min 10 min 10 min 10 min pitch design Prepare your pitch
  56. 56. how might we get more Victorians physically active?
  57. 57. the design challenge • How might we make it easier or more fun for people to get active? • How might we enable them to achieve their goals through regular activity? • What else do they value that they might get through physical activity? • How might we help them to overcome obstacles and challenges to getting active?
  58. 58. applying for the innovation challenge? Think about: 1. How will your idea get more people physically active? 2. How is it different to anything else out there? 3. How are you taking advantage of market trends? 4. Who will you recruit to be on your project team? 5. How will your project be sustainable in time?
  59. 59. rapid PROTOTYPing 1ST DESIGN Start with the basics 1ST TEST Test your concept with others 2ND DESIGN Refine your concept 2ND TEST Test your final concept 15 min 10 min 10 min 10 min 10 min pitch design Prepare your pitch
  60. 60. 1. KEEP IT SIMPLE 2. You don’t have to think of everything. 3. Focus on your market segment and the insights from your persona. 4. What problem are you solving for them and what value is your idea to them. 5. Be able to explain your idea quickly and simply. 6. Asign roles. Who’s the scribe? The designer? The user? 7. Test internally as you go… round one: design 15 min
  61. 61. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  62. 62. 1. You have 10 minutes to explain your idea to 
 members of other teams. 2. Your team mates will split up and go to other tables 
 and hear about the idea they’ve come up with. Things to consider: 1. Is the idea engaging? Can you see where it would create value for the target audience? 2. Is it easy to get? What was hard to understand? 3. What smart things have other teams done that you can steal? round one: test 10 min
  63. 63. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  64. 64. 1. Incorporate feedback and ideas from people
 who came to your table. Share it with your team 
 mates. 2. Incorporate what your team mates have learned from other teams. 3. Start to refine and develop different elements 
 of your idea. How do people access your product
 or service? How do they find out about it? How does
 your persona feel when they use it? What do they love about it? round two: design 10 min
  65. 65. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  66. 66. 1. You have another 10 minutes to explain your
 idea to members of other teams. 2. Your team mates will split up again and go to other tables 
 and see how other the team’s ideas have developed. Things to consider: 1. How will this idea get more people physically active? 2. How is it different to anything else out there? 3. How are they taking advantage of market trends? 4. How will this project be sustainable in time? round two: test 10 min
  67. 67. 30 SECONDS LEFT
  68. 68. the pitch
  69. 69. 1. Your pitch is allowed to be up to 2 minutes long. 2. Decide on a name for your product/service/
 campaign. 3. Identify the problem you’re solving. 4. Identify your target audience and the value you’re creating for them (why they’re going to love it). 5. Explain how it works - your target audience and other key stakeholders need to understand. 6. Decide on the format. A standard sales pitch, a demonstration or a story board of your user journey? pitch design 10 min
  70. 70. what makes a great pitch? 1. Start with why. 1. What’s the problem you’re solving.? 2. Why is it important? 3. What’s the impact? Use memorable facts, figures, anecdotes and metaphors. 2. What’s your solution? 3. Who’s your audience? 4. What do they value? 5. How is your idea different from others out there?
  71. 71. what makes a great pitch? 6. Who are you partnering with? 7. What are you building on that already exists? 8. Where are you in the stage of implementing your idea? 9. What do you need to take the next step? 10. How can we help you get there? What would you like us to do? 11. Share your passion. 12. Finish with your tagline.
  72. 72. what’s your elevator pitch?
  73. 73. the 30 second pitch http://techcrunch.com/2010/11/03/madlibs-pitch-adeo-ressi-founder-institute/ [We/my organisation/project] is developing a [defined offering] to help [target audience] to [solve a problem] with [secret sauce].
  74. 74. lean canvas
  75. 75. what are VicHealth looking for? Ideas that address the following criteria: 1. Get more people physically active 2. Point of difference: be clever, timely and unique. 3. Equity: reach the hard to reach and move the hard to move. 4. Scalability: able to be expanded, upscaled or transferred 5. Sustainability: will be able to stand on its own two feet. 6. Partners: recruited a project team that brings a unique perspective 7. Sharable: documented your project so we can share it online 8. Ready to roll!: must be able to test within 12 months
  76. 76. applying for the innovation challenge Think about: 1. How will your idea get more people physically active? 2. How is it different to anything else out there? 3. How are you taking advantage of market trends? 4. Who will you recruit to be on your project team? 5. How will your project be sustainable in time?
  77. 77. applying for the innovation challenge Stage 1: Produce and submit your video pitch Two minute pitch videos to be submitted by Friday 29 August Videos will be reviewed by a VicHealth shortlisting committee. Stage 2: Shortlisted pitches will develop a business plan Pitches to be shortlisted (week of) Monday 1 September. If your idea is shortlisted, you will be asked to develop a simple business plan to explore your idea in more detail (week of) Monday 8 September. Stage 3: Present to an Assessment Panel Shortlisted applicants will then be invited to present to an assessment panel on Tuesday 30 September. http://challenge.vichealth.vic.gov.au/about.html
  78. 78. applying for the innovation challenge • Don’t worry about the quality of your video, VicHealth will be assessing the quality of the idea, not the quality of the footage. • VicHealth do not expect you to develop professional quality videos. Make it cheap and cheerful. Just talk to a camera. You can even record yourself on your smart phone! challenge.vichealth.vic.gov.au
  79. 79. welcome join the conversation on twitter with @VicHealth @DoingSomeGood #VHinnov DAVID HOOD @DavidAHood JULIAN WATERS-LYNCH @jwaterslynch doingsomething good

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