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A Balanced Scorecard approach to
Breed Health Improvement
© 2011 Ian J Seath: Version 1
Breed Health Improvement must...
● Be led by the Breed Clubs: effectively,
consistently and with energy
● Be planned, evid...
From Leadership to Improvement...
1: Leadership
& Capability
2: Processes for
Planning,
Communicating &
Improving
4: Real ...
From Leadership to Improvement...
LeadPlan
Improve Engage
© 2011 Ian J Seath
Enablers
Results
To improve Breed Health we need...
● Clear objectives
● Measurements to
be able to track
progress
● Appropriate targets
to...
What objectives should be in a Breed
Health Improvement Strategy?
Some examples...
© 2011 Ian J Seath
Leadership and Capability:
Objectives
● The Breed Council/Clubs actively drive
continuous Health Improvement
● The Breed H...
Processes for Planning, Communicating &
Improving: Objectives
● Health Improvement Planning develops
breed-wide strategies...
Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders:
Objectives
● All Breed Club members actively support
and contribute to meeting Health
I...
Breed Health Improvement:
Objectives
● Specific breed disease prevalence is
reduced
● Aspects of breed conformation that
a...
Breed Health Improvement Maturity
Assessment
A framework for self-assessment & planning
© 2011 Ian J Seath
5 levels of Breed Health
Improvement Maturity
5: Inspiring The breed is widely recognised as being a benchmark for its hea...
Breed Health Improvement Maturity
alignment with the KarltonIndexTM
5: Inspiring
KI > 60%
The breed is widely recognised a...
Lead...
1: Leadership
& Capability
2: Processes for
Planning,
Communicating &
Improving
4: Real Breed
Health
Improvements
...
L1: Leadership
5: Inspiring Leadership of health improvement is widely shared by individuals and
groups representing all b...
L2: Resources/Funding
5: Inspiring Fund-raising is driven by the Breed Health Plan, with clear annual targets
and criteria...
Plan...
1: Leadership
& Capability
2: Processes for
Planning,
Communicating &
Improving
4: Real Breed
Health
Improvements
...
P1: Planning
5: Inspiring Breed Health Plans are evidence-based, regularly reviewed and
demonstrably driving improvements
...
P2: Breed Health Surveillance
5: Inspiring In addition to Breed Health Improvement planning with surveillance from
surveys...
P3: Partners
5: Inspiring The Breed Council/Clubs openly and willingly share learning, and work in
partnership with those ...
P4: Communication
5: Inspiring A comprehensive communications strategy underpins all health
improvement activity and addre...
Engage...
© 2011 Ian J Seath
1: Leadership
& Capability
2: Processes for
Planning,
Communicating &
Improving
4: Real Breed...
E1: Breed Club Members
5: Inspiring The majority of Breed Club members fully support health improvement
activities, includ...
E2: Breeders - Non-Club Members
5: Inspiring The majority of people breeding a litter adopt the good practices
recommended...
E3: Owners and Potential Owners
5: Inspiring The majority of buyers/owners are aware of the good practices
recommended by ...
Improve...
© 2011 Ian J Seath
1: Leadership
& Capability
2: Processes for
Planning,
Communicating &
Improving
4: Real Bree...
I1: Health Improvement - Disease
Reduction
5: Inspiring There is strong evidence of sustainable improvement across all the...
I2: Health Improvement - Conformation
5: Inspiring There is evidence of sustainable improvement in breed health as a resul...
I3: Health Improvement -
Genetics/Diversity
5: Inspiring There is strong evidence of sustainable improvements in genetic d...
How to achieve Breed Health
Improvements using the Balanced
Scorecard and Maturity Assessment
Getting started...
© 2011 Ia...
Five steps for achieving effective
change
Identify your starting point
Decide where you want to get to
Decide how to bridg...
Where are you now?
● Self-assess your breed using the 5-level
Assessment Grids
o Ideally, this should be done by your Bree...
Where are you now? - example
Improve Engage
I1: Disease E1: Breed Club Members
I2: Conformation E2: Non-Breed Club Breeder...
Where are you now? - example
Initial Intent Initiative Intelligent Inspiring
L1: Leadership
L2: Resources/Funding
P1: Plan...
Where do you want to be?
● Identify what you currently do well and need
to continue to do
● Identify what you currently do...
Where do you want to be?
● Be realistic about what you want to achieve
and how quickly you can achieve it
o Leadership and...
Decide how to bridge the gaps
● Identify the most important and practical
opportunities for further improvement:
o Where c...
Get started!
● If you wait to develop the "perfect plan", you
will wait a very long time
● If you wait to get "everyone on...
Who will come with you?
Champions
Early
Supporters
Wait and see
Reluctant
Followers
Blockers and
Terrorists
Enthuse
Educat...
Review and renew
● Review progress at least twice a year, to
ensure your planned actions are being
implemented
o Ensure th...
Success factors...
● Be open and honest when assessing your breed's
current situation
● Be ready to learn from good ideas ...
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A Balanced Scorecard approach to Breed Health Improvement

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This is a presentation from 2011 which contains some of the ideas that made their way into the Kennel Club's Breed Health Improvement Strategy Guide.

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A Balanced Scorecard approach to Breed Health Improvement

  1. 1. A Balanced Scorecard approach to Breed Health Improvement © 2011 Ian J Seath: Version 1
  2. 2. Breed Health Improvement must... ● Be led by the Breed Clubs: effectively, consistently and with energy ● Be planned, evidence-based and regularly reviewed ● Actively engage all Breeders ● Be well-communicated to owners and potential owners ● Be supported by other key stakeholders ● Achieve real and lasting breed health improvements © 2011 Ian J Seath
  3. 3. From Leadership to Improvement... 1: Leadership & Capability 2: Processes for Planning, Communicating & Improving 4: Real Breed Health Improvements 3: Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders © 2011 Ian J Seath
  4. 4. From Leadership to Improvement... LeadPlan Improve Engage © 2011 Ian J Seath Enablers Results
  5. 5. To improve Breed Health we need... ● Clear objectives ● Measurements to be able to track progress ● Appropriate targets to achieve ● Specific actions to achieve the objectives © 2011 Ian J Seath
  6. 6. What objectives should be in a Breed Health Improvement Strategy? Some examples... © 2011 Ian J Seath
  7. 7. Leadership and Capability: Objectives ● The Breed Council/Clubs actively drive continuous Health Improvement ● The Breed Health Coordinator has the right motivation, knowledge and skills ● A H&W Sub-committee provides additional capacity and expertise ● Breed-specific Veterinary/Geneticist/ Specialist expertise is used ● Funds are raised to support Health Improvement © 2011 Ian J Seath
  8. 8. Processes for Planning, Communicating & Improving: Objectives ● Health Improvement Planning develops breed-wide strategies as well as disease- specific plans ● Breed health surveillance is used to inform evidence-based plans ● External specialists/partners are involved in planning/supporting health improvement ● A broad range of stakeholders is identified and a wide range of approaches is used to engage with them © 2011 Ian J Seath
  9. 9. Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders: Objectives ● All Breed Club members actively support and contribute to meeting Health Improvement objectives ● Non-Breed Club breeders and owners are aware of breed health recommendations ● Potential owners are well-informed about the breed and how to buy/own a healthy dog ● The Kennel Club supports and recognises the work of the Breed Council/Clubs ● The breed is widely recognised for its achievements in health improvement © 2011 Ian J Seath
  10. 10. Breed Health Improvement: Objectives ● Specific breed disease prevalence is reduced ● Aspects of breed conformation that adversely affect health are addressed ● Issues of genetic diversity are addressed © 2011 Ian J Seath
  11. 11. Breed Health Improvement Maturity Assessment A framework for self-assessment & planning © 2011 Ian J Seath
  12. 12. 5 levels of Breed Health Improvement Maturity 5: Inspiring The breed is widely recognised as being a benchmark for its health improvement strategy and has demonstrated sustainable improvements 4: Intelligent The breed has a clear and effective strategy and there are early signs of real health improvements 3: Initiative There is a breed-wide approach to health improvement and plans are in place to address priority issues 2: Intent A few Clubs are taking the lead in tackling the breed's most significant health issues 1: Initial There is little evidence of a breed-wide approach to health improvement and some evidence of a "breed in denial" © 2011 Ian J Seath
  13. 13. Breed Health Improvement Maturity alignment with the KarltonIndexTM 5: Inspiring KI > 60% The breed is widely recognised as being a benchmark for its health improvement strategy and has demonstrated sustainable improvements 4: Intelligent KI 40-59% The breed has a clear and effective strategy and there are early signs of real health improvements 3: Initiative KI 20-39% There is a breed-wide approach to health improvement and plans are in place to address priority issues 2: Intent KI 10-19% A few Clubs are taking the lead in tackling the breed's most significant health issues 1: Initial KI 0-9% There is little evidence of a breed-wide approach to health improvement and some evidence of a "breed in denial" © 2011 Ian J Seath
  14. 14. Lead... 1: Leadership & Capability 2: Processes for Planning, Communicating & Improving 4: Real Breed Health Improvements 3: Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders © 2011 Ian J Seath
  15. 15. L1: Leadership 5: Inspiring Leadership of health improvement is widely shared by individuals and groups representing all breed interests ( e.g. pet, show, working, agility, obedience) 4: Intelligent Leadership of health matters includes veterinary and/or geneticist expertise 3: Initiative A Health Sub-Committee has been appointed and a few keen individuals are taking a lead 2: Intent A Health Coordinator has been appointed 1: Initial There is no obvious leadership or interest in Breed Health Improvement © 2011 Ian J Seath
  16. 16. L2: Resources/Funding 5: Inspiring Fund-raising is driven by the Breed Health Plan, with clear annual targets and criteria for spending/investment 4: Intelligent A Health Fund is established and Clubs and individuals contribute 3: Initiative Fund-raising is carried out on a case-by-case basis to deal with individual health issues 2: Intent Funds are raised on an ad hoc basis (e.g. Club raffles) 1: Initial There are no resources available, or allocated, to health improvement and the Breed Council/Clubs see no need for a Health Fund © 2011 Ian J Seath
  17. 17. Plan... 1: Leadership & Capability 2: Processes for Planning, Communicating & Improving 4: Real Breed Health Improvements 3: Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders © 2011 Ian J Seath
  18. 18. P1: Planning 5: Inspiring Breed Health Plans are evidence-based, regularly reviewed and demonstrably driving improvements 4: Intelligent There is a clearly defined strategy and plans for breed health improvement covering all four areas of this framework (Lead, Plan, Engage, Improve) 3: Initiative Plans are developed to include 'enablers' (Lead and Plan) as well as addressing individual health issues 2: Intent Plans are developed for individual health issues, but there is no overall strategy 1: Initial There are no plans for breed health improvement © 2011 Ian J Seath
  19. 19. P2: Breed Health Surveillance 5: Inspiring In addition to Breed Health Improvement planning with surveillance from surveys, there is regular monitoring of causes of death, genetic diversity, litter sizes/fertility and Popular Sires 4: Intelligent There is a process in place for continuous health surveillance using surveys of health problems and deaths, and the results are reviewed and published 3: Initiative A Breed Health Survey has been conducted in the past 12 months and the data have been used to inform Health Improvement Plans 2: Intent Plans are being developed to implement a Breed Health Survey 1: Initial There is no health surveillance in place and no plans to implement it; the KC Survey from 2004 is "long-forgotten" © 2011 Ian J Seath
  20. 20. P3: Partners 5: Inspiring The Breed Council/Clubs openly and willingly share learning, and work in partnership with those in other breeds to help improve canine health 4: Intelligent A range of relevant partners, including those in other breeds with similar issues, works with the Breed Council/Clubs to support improvement activities 3: Initiative External specialists are involved with the Breed Council/Clubs in helping to plan overall breed health improvement 2: Intent External specialists work with the Breed Council/Clubs on addressing specific health issues 1: Initial No external partners or specialists are involved in breed health improvement © 2011 Ian J Seath
  21. 21. P4: Communication 5: Inspiring A comprehensive communications strategy underpins all health improvement activity and addresses all key stakeholders 4: Intelligent Communication is two-way, open, planned, regular and targeted at key audiences, using a diverse range of channels/media 3: Initiative Additional communications channels are adopted, including online social media 2: Intent Health matters are published in an ad hoc manner on Club websites and in newsletters 1: Initial There is no communication of breed health matters © 2011 Ian J Seath
  22. 22. Engage... © 2011 Ian J Seath 1: Leadership & Capability 2: Processes for Planning, Communicating & Improving 4: Real Breed Health Improvements 3: Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders
  23. 23. E1: Breed Club Members 5: Inspiring The majority of Breed Club members fully support health improvement activities, including issues related to genetic diversity, and are open/honest about health issues 4: Intelligent Most Breed Club members willingly support screening and health recommendations and are aware of genetic diversity issues (CoI) 3: Initiative Many Breed Club members adopt screening and health improvement recommendations made by the Breed Council/Clubs 2: Intent Breed health issues are brought into the open by a few concerned members of Breed Council/Club Committees, or Club members 1: Initial Breed health issues are ignored or denied by the Breed Council/Clubs and their members © 2011 Ian J Seath
  24. 24. E2: Breeders - Non-Club Members 5: Inspiring The majority of people breeding a litter adopt the good practices recommended by the Breed Council/Clubs, including those on genetic diversity and CoI 4: Intelligent Most breeders are aware of, and willingly adopt, screening and health recommendations and a few are aware of genetic diversity issues 3: Initiative Some breeders are aware of, and adopt, screening and health improvement recommendations made by the Breed Council/Clubs 2: Intent A minority of breeders are aware of the health issues/recommendations made by the Breed Council/Clubs, but few adopt them 1: Initial Most breeders are unaware of health issues, or ignore and deny them © 2011 Ian J Seath
  25. 25. E3: Owners and Potential Owners 5: Inspiring The majority of buyers/owners are aware of the good practices recommended by the Breed Council/Clubs, including those on genetic diversity and CoI, and make well-informed buying decisions 4: Intelligent Most buyers/owners are fully aware of breed-specific screening and health recommendations, as well as genetic diversity issues 3: Initiative Many buyers/owners are aware of screening and health improvement recommendations made by the Breed Council/Clubs and use them to inform their buying decision 2: Intent A few buyers/owners are aware of the health issues/recommendations made by the Breed Council/Clubs, but rarely take account of them 1: Initial Most buyers/owners are unaware of health issues in the breed and are uninformed when making a buying decision © 2011 Ian J Seath
  26. 26. Improve... © 2011 Ian J Seath 1: Leadership & Capability 2: Processes for Planning, Communicating & Improving 4: Real Breed Health Improvements 3: Engaged & Supportive Stakeholders
  27. 27. I1: Health Improvement - Disease Reduction 5: Inspiring There is strong evidence of sustainable improvement across all the diseases/conditions prioritised by the Breed Health Plan 4: Intelligent There is clear evidence of improvement in most specific areas of the breed's health disease priorities 3: Initiative There is evidence of improvement in several specific diseases/ conditions that are breed health priorities 2: Intent Some evidence of health improvements is emerging in the highest priority area of disease in the breed 1: Initial There is no evidence of improvement in the diseases/conditions known to affect the breed and there is some evidence that the situation is deteriorating © 2011 Ian J Seath
  28. 28. I2: Health Improvement - Conformation 5: Inspiring There is evidence of sustainable improvement in breed health as a result of addressing conformation issues 4: Intelligent There is emerging evidence of improvement in breed health as a result of acting to address conformation issues 3: Initiative There are plans in place and breeders and judges have been made aware of health issues related to the breed's conformation 2: Intent The Breed Council/Clubs are aware of health issues caused by conformation and the Breed Standard has been amended accordingly 1: Initial There is no awareness by the Breed Council/Clubs of health issues related to conformation, or their impact on the breed's long-term viability © 2011 Ian J Seath
  29. 29. I3: Health Improvement - Genetics/Diversity 5: Inspiring There is strong evidence of sustainable improvements in genetic diversity with reduced bottlenecks and breed average CoI below 6.25% 4: Intelligent There is clear evidence of improvement in reducing genetic bottlenecks and moving towards a breed average CoI of 6.25% or less 3: Initiative There is some evidence of improvement in addressing specific issues of genetic diversity such as Popular Sires, and in reducing breed average CoI 2: Intent The Breed Council/Clubs are aware of issues caused by Popular Sires, genetic bottlenecks, reduced fertility and breed average CoI values exceeding 12.5% 1: Initial There is no awareness by the Breed Council/Clubs of issues related to genetic diversity, or their impact on the long-term viability of the breed © 2011 Ian J Seath
  30. 30. How to achieve Breed Health Improvements using the Balanced Scorecard and Maturity Assessment Getting started... © 2011 Ian J Seath
  31. 31. Five steps for achieving effective change Identify your starting point Decide where you want to get to Decide how to bridge the gaps Get started! Review and re-new © 2011 Ian J Seath
  32. 32. Where are you now? ● Self-assess your breed using the 5-level Assessment Grids o Ideally, this should be done by your Breed's Health Coordinator and Health Sub-committee ● Decide which of the five levels you are currently at, for each of the Scorecard areas: o Lead o Plan o Engage o Improve ● Identify the key issues your assessment has highlighted that need to be addressed © 2011 Ian J Seath
  33. 33. Where are you now? - example Improve Engage I1: Disease E1: Breed Club Members I2: Conformation E2: Non-Breed Club Breeders I3: Genetics/Diversity E3: Owners/Potential Owners Plan Lead P1: Planning L1: Leadership P2: Health Surveillance L2: Resources/Funding P2: Partners P4: Communication Initial Intent Initiative Intelligent Inspiring © 2011 Ian J Seath
  34. 34. Where are you now? - example Initial Intent Initiative Intelligent Inspiring L1: Leadership L2: Resources/Funding P1: Planning P2: Health Surveillance P3: Partners P4: Communication E1: Breed Club Members E2: Non-Breed Club Breeders E3: Owners/Potential Owners I1: Disease Reduction I2: Conformation I3: Genetics/Diversity © 2011 Ian J Seath
  35. 35. Where do you want to be? ● Identify what you currently do well and need to continue to do ● Identify what you currently do well, but need to enhance, or "step up a gear" ● Identify what you currently do well and could usefully extend into other areas ● Identify what you currently do that isn't really working and needs to be changed ● Identify what you are currently not doing and need to start © 2011 Ian J Seath
  36. 36. Where do you want to be? ● Be realistic about what you want to achieve and how quickly you can achieve it o Leadership and Planning objectives can be achieved within 1-2 years o Engagement objectives will take longer to achieve; perhaps 2-4 years o Health Improvement objectives may take 4-10 years to achieve, depending on your breed's starting point and the range of issues to be addressed © 2011 Ian J Seath
  37. 37. Decide how to bridge the gaps ● Identify the most important and practical opportunities for further improvement: o Where can your breed make better use of its strengths? o Where can you learn from good practice in other breeds and apply it in your own? o Where could you be more systematic in the way you do things? o Where do existing initiatives need better coordination or organisation? o Which of the "enablers" will have the biggest impact on the "results" your breed needs to achieve? © 2011 Ian J Seath
  38. 38. Get started! ● If you wait to develop the "perfect plan", you will wait a very long time ● If you wait to get "everyone on board", you will wait a very long time ● Find some "early supporters" who want to work with you to improve things ● Have a go; see what works, then refine it and extend it © 2011 Ian J Seath
  39. 39. Who will come with you? Champions Early Supporters Wait and see Reluctant Followers Blockers and Terrorists Enthuse Educate Enforce © 2011 Ian J Seath
  40. 40. Review and renew ● Review progress at least twice a year, to ensure your planned actions are being implemented o Ensure the Breed Council/Clubs are aware of progress, successes and barriers ● Review how relevant and appropriate your current actions are o Health priorities can change o New research findings can open up new opportunities ● Repeat your self-assessment using the framework (perhaps every 18-24 months) © 2011 Ian J Seath
  41. 41. Success factors... ● Be open and honest when assessing your breed's current situation ● Be ready to learn from good ideas and practices in other breeds ● Share your breed's good practices with others ● Don't dwell on the past; focus on improving things for the future of the breed ● Use the Scorecard and Assessment Framework as a guide, not a "prescription" ● Don't expect quick fixes; real health improvement is a long-term commitment © 2011 Ian J Seath

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