Military 101  HERO 2 HIRED    Supported By                   1
Meet your presenter  Sandy Williams Currently serves as a Captain in the US Army Reserves and as a Government Service (GS)...
Make up of today’s military• Approximately 2.3 million serve in the Armed Forces (As of August 2011 - Source:  U.S. Depart...
Reserve Component UnemploymentDMDC report: Dec 11, 121,000 Guard and Reserve members surveyedMost recent HIGHER than      ...
Enlisted Personnel• Enlisted – Enlisted personnel make up about  83% of the Armed Forces.• Carry out the fundamental opera...
What they do….. Table 1. Active Duty Enlisted personnel by broad occupational group and branch of military, and Coast Guar...
DevelopmentoccupationsMachine Operatorand Production          5,398     6,234          1,946     2,532         9,599     2...
Officers• Officers make up the remaining 17% and are  leaders of the military, supervising and  managing activities in eve...
Table 2. Active Duty Officer personnel by broad occupational group and branch of military, and Coast Guard, August 2011   ...
Why Hire a Person with Military Experience?                  Because they….•   Are Proven Leaders•   Maintain Professional...
Plus you’ll get……•   Tax Credits•   Expanded Paid Apprenticeship Programs•   Employees with Education Benefits•   Improved...
They have what you are looking for… Marine Specialties                                          Food Service              ...
Grade versus Rank• Grade structure is common across all Services• Junior Officer is an 0-1 to 0-3 and has between 1-9 year...
Military Salaries• Military members earn a combination of several types of pay  which make up their total compensation pac...
Pay ChartsSupported By               15
Understanding “Military Speak”One of the challenges Service members face when moving to the civilian sector isthe language...
Understanding “Military Speak”          Supported By                         17
Understanding “Military Speak”• Each service has a different name and acronym for their occupational code.  Military Occup...
Translating “Military Speak”There are a number of resources available oninternet, we recommend;                         ww...
Three important questions to ask• What is your grade?• What is your Military Occupational Code?• When are you available  –...
What are the benefits of H2H.jobs for employers?                Supported By                                     21
Thank you for your interestin hiring Service Members          Supported By
H2H.jobsPlease visit us @ www.h2h.jobs and let us help you fill those vacant positions in your organization.              ...
QUESTIONS?  Supported By                 24
POC    Sandra Williams    Program AnalystSandra.williams@osd.mil     703-697-5253      Supported By                      25
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Military 101: Know the Basics About the Military to Improve Recruiting Success

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Military 101: Know the Basics About the Military to Improve Recruiting Success

  1. 1. Military 101 HERO 2 HIRED Supported By 1
  2. 2. Meet your presenter Sandy Williams Currently serves as a Captain in the US Army Reserves and as a Government Service (GS) Employee at the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs, Employer Programs and Policy • 16+ Years of active & reserve military service • Background in transportation, intelligence, and operations • Masters in Business Administration • Formerly an Operations Manager with FedEx and FedEx International (14 years) Supported By 2
  3. 3. Make up of today’s military• Approximately 2.3 million serve in the Armed Forces (As of August 2011 - Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Manpower Data Center )• 1.4 Million serve on Active Duty • Army – 565,000 • Navy – 322,000 • Air Force – 330,000 • Marines – 201,000 • Coast Guard – 42,000 • 846,000 serve in the Reserves, Air National Guard and Army National Guard Supported By 3
  4. 4. Reserve Component UnemploymentDMDC report: Dec 11, 121,000 Guard and Reserve members surveyedMost recent HIGHER than May-03 Sep-03 May-04 Nov-04 Jun-05 Dec-05 Jun-06 Dec-06 Jun-07 Dec-07 Jun-08 Nov-08 Jun-09 Dec-09 Jan-11Most recent LOWER than  Total 5 4 6 4 5 6 6 5 5 6 6 7 11 12 13  ARNG 6 5 7 5 6 8 8 6 7 7 8 8 14 14 16  USAR 6 6 7 6 6 6 7 7 5 7 8 8 14 14 15 p USNR 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 7 8 9 n USMCR 8 6 7 4 9 7 9 7 7 6 8 11 13 17 17  ANG 3 2 4 3 3 4 3 3 2 2 3 4 5 5 5  USAFR 3 2 3 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 3 4 6 6 7Most recent HIGHER than May-03 Sep-03 May-04 Nov-04 Jun-05 Dec-05 Jun-06 Dec-06 Jun-07 Dec-07 Jun-08 Nov-08 Jun-09 Dec-09 Jan-11Most recent LOWER than  Total 5 4 6 4 5 6 6 5 5 6 6 7 11 12 13  E1-E4 10 8 11 7 10 11 11 9 10 11 12 15 21 22 23 p E5-E9 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 5 6 6 8 n O1-O3 2 2 2 3 4 5 5 4 3 4 3 4 6 6 7  O4-O6 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 3 3  13% of RC service members are unemployed: 6% higher than the overall Veterans population  65% of members reported being currently employed. In 2003, that employed rate was 79%. 14% decrease.  RC Unemployment claims (DoD UCX) increased +6 percentage points since Jun 08. Total UCX costing DoD approx. 1 Billon dollars annually and expected to increase.  Reserve Component lower enlisted personnel (E1-E4) unemployed: 23% Supported By 4
  5. 5. Enlisted Personnel• Enlisted – Enlisted personnel make up about 83% of the Armed Forces.• Carry out the fundamental operations of the military• Highly trained and training continues throughout their career. Supported By 5
  6. 6. What they do….. Table 1. Active Duty Enlisted personnel by broad occupational group and branch of military, and Coast Guard, August 2011 Total enlisted personnel Enlisted Army Air Force Coast Guard Marine Corps Navy in each occupation group Occupational Group Questions Administrative 6,661 15,302 2,274 11,669 19,585 55,491 occupations Combat Specialty 129,684 639 616 32,706 7,854 192,499 occupations Construction 20,499 5,185 — 5,067 5,206 35,957 occupations Electronic and Electrical Equipment Repair 40,214 31,048 4,475 14,098 48,118 137,953 occupations Engineering, Science, and Technical 45,684 47,436 1,288 25,297 40,436 160,141 occupations Health Care occupations 31,317 15,935 693 — 24,068 72,013 Human Resource Development 18,974 12,532 — 8,407 4,108 44,021 occupationsSource: U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Manpower Date Center Supported By 6
  7. 7. DevelopmentoccupationsMachine Operatorand Production 5,398 6,234 1,946 2,532 9,599 25,709occupationsMedia and Public 8,209 6,848 122 2,381 3,854 21,414Affairs occupationsProtective Service 27,380 34,738 2,837 9,534 11,959 86,448occupationsSupport Service 13,109 1,483 1,218 2,119 8,032 25,961occupationsTransportation andMaterial Handling 63,566 31,279 10,900 23,154 38,148 167,047occupationsVehicle andMachinery Mechanic 52,974 42,032 5,554 18,586 47,022 166,168occupationsNon-occupation orunspecified coded 3,441 13,117 1,663 1,926 606 20,753personnelTotal enlistedpersonnel for each 467,110 263,808 33,586 178,476 268,595 1,211,575military branch andCoast Guard Supported By 7
  8. 8. Officers• Officers make up the remaining 17% and are leaders of the military, supervising and managing activities in every occupational specialty in the military• Requires a 4 year college degree for entry• Advanced civilian education for promotion• Military and civilian education continues throughout their career Supported By 8
  9. 9. Table 2. Active Duty Officer personnel by broad occupational group and branch of military, and Coast Guard, August 2011 Total officer personnel in each occupationalOfficer Army Air Force Coast Guard Marine Corps Navy groupOccupational GroupCombat Specialty 19,029 3,986 — 4,039 6,036 33,090occupationsEngineering, Science,and Technical 21,573 14,841 3 3,922 9,556 49,895occupationsExecutive,Administrative, and 12,422 7,760 61 2,620 7,082 29,945ManagerialoccupationsHealth Care 11,092 8,917 — — 5,896 25,905occupationsHuman ResourceDevelopment 2,890 2,989 19 284 3,032 9,214occupationsMedia and Public 340 297 7 170 270 1,084Affairs occupationsProtective Service 3,074 1,015 1 358 1,003 5,451occupationsSupport Service 1,866 685 7 39 928 3,525occupationsTransportation 13,535 18,158 1 6,349 11,374 49,417occupationsSOURCE: U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Manpower Data Center Supported By 9
  10. 10. Why Hire a Person with Military Experience? Because they….• Are Proven Leaders• Maintain Professionalism• Take Responsibility• Understand Diversity• Are Physically Fit and Drug-Free• Have a “Can Do” Attitude• Are Calm Under Pressure• Exude a First Class Image• Are On-Time, All the Time• Have a Global Perspective Supported By 10
  11. 11. Plus you’ll get……• Tax Credits• Expanded Paid Apprenticeship Programs• Employees with Education Benefits• Improved Company Productivity• Reduced Manpower Costs Supported By 11
  12. 12. They have what you are looking for… Marine Specialties Food Service Welders Satellite Lawyers Intelligence Construction Engineers Finance / Accounting HVAC Material Handling Contracting / Purchasing The Military has over 7,000 Pilots job positions across more Air Traffic Controllers Doctors than 100+ functional areas Transportation Mechanics and 81% of these jobs have Machinists Nurses a direct civilian equivalent. IT / Computer Human Resources / Training / Recruiting Telecommunications Police / Security Media / Graphic Arts Supply Chain / Logistics Medical Specialties Postal Operations©2011 The Value of a Veteran (all rights reserved) Supported By 12
  13. 13. Grade versus Rank• Grade structure is common across all Services• Junior Officer is an 0-1 to 0-3 and has between 1-9 years of experience at increasing levels of responsibility. Similar to a department head.• Mid Grade Officer is an 0-4 to 0-5 has typically 9-21 years of experience, higher levels of leadership and education. Similar to Senior Manager or VP.• Senior Officer is an 0-6 to 0-10 and has between 21-30 years experience. Similar to a Senior VP, CEO.• Rank equivalent to grades will differ for each service • Captain in the Navy is an 0-6 with 20 +/- years of service • Captain in the Army is an 0-3 with 3-7 years of service Supported By 13
  14. 14. Military Salaries• Military members earn a combination of several types of pay which make up their total compensation package;• Base Pay• Housing Allowance*• Subsistence Allowance*• Position-based specialty pays (i.e., doctors, pilots, etc.)*• Skill-based pays (paratrooper, linguist, etc.)* = not taxed Supported By 14
  15. 15. Pay ChartsSupported By 15
  16. 16. Understanding “Military Speak”One of the challenges Service members face when moving to the civilian sector isthe language barrier, the military has its own language(s), in fact the sister servicesdont speak the same language. “SECURE THAT BUILDING” Supported By 16
  17. 17. Understanding “Military Speak” Supported By 17
  18. 18. Understanding “Military Speak”• Each service has a different name and acronym for their occupational code. Military Occupational Code (MOC) is a term understood by all service members. • MOS (Army Enlisted, Marine Corps Officer and Enlisted) • AOC (Army Officers) • AFSC (Air Force Enlisted and Officers) • NEC (Navy Enlisted) • NOBC (Navy Officer)• The civilian equivalent or translation of these codes can be confusing, BUT, there are tools out there to help. Supported By 18
  19. 19. Translating “Military Speak”There are a number of resources available oninternet, we recommend; www://h2h.jobsH2H.jobs offers you one of the best skills translators available on the market.With H2H you get free, direct access to qualified candidates who already havebackground checks and security clearances, which helps reduce recruitingand hiring costs. Supported By 19
  20. 20. Three important questions to ask• What is your grade?• What is your Military Occupational Code?• When are you available – Retiring service members start looking for civilian employment approximately one year out – Soldiers returning from deployment are usually looking for immediate employment – Underemployed service members, start date varies Supported By 20
  21. 21. What are the benefits of H2H.jobs for employers? Supported By 21
  22. 22. Thank you for your interestin hiring Service Members Supported By
  23. 23. H2H.jobsPlease visit us @ www.h2h.jobs and let us help you fill those vacant positions in your organization. Supported By 23
  24. 24. QUESTIONS? Supported By 24
  25. 25. POC Sandra Williams Program AnalystSandra.williams@osd.mil 703-697-5253 Supported By 25

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