On line tutor safeguarding course

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Cambridgeshire County Council Adult Learning and Skills
On line tutor safeguarding course

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On line tutor safeguarding course

  1. 1. Adult Safeguarding in Adult Learning & Skills On line course for tutors in Adult Learning and Skills If in doubt talk to your centre manager
  2. 2. Objectives At the end of this course you will: • Understand why staff in Adult Learning have to implement Adult Safeguarding • Know the procedures for implementing Adult Safeguarding within adult learning • Have developed skills in recognising and managing Adult Safeguarding situations If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 2
  3. 3. Adult Safeguarding Resources You need to have your Adult Safeguarding resources folder provided by your centre manager with you when you follow this on-line course. It will be referred to later in this course If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 3
  4. 4. Tutor Resources Folder contents: 1. Guidelines on Discrimination 2. E safety guidelines Guidance for tutors and learners using the Internet 3. Incident report form Form to copy and use to record details of incidents 4. Contact details Contact details of key people and agencies Please read through carefully and keep folder in a safe place If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 4
  5. 5. Why is Adult Safeguarding important to Adult Education? If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 5
  6. 6. Brief history of Adult Safeguarding A series of high profile deaths to vulnerable adults, caused by abuse where agencies were providing support but not communicating and taking responsibility. These cases led to Government guidance “No Secrets” No Secrets (Adult Protection) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia This guidance is for agencies such as police, local authorities, housing associations, homelessness, health services, education, to try to ensure “joined up” services. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 6
  7. 7. Adult Safeguarding Legislation Standards of care for vulnerable adults in receipt of adult social care, has been regulated primarily through the Care Standards Act 2000 and more latterly the Adult Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (SOVA) and the Protection of vulnerable Adults Act 2012 (POVA) Abuse within the community, unless perpetrated by paid domiciliary workers, is addressed through the No Secrets guidance. (See Wikipedia for all Acts) If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 7
  8. 8. Regulation Social and health care are regulated through the CQC (Care Quality Commission) Education is regulated by Ofsted and Adult Safeguarding is a very high priority. In an Ofsted inspection, if Adult Safeguarding arrangements are not good, then the grade for Overall Effectiveness will marked down If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 8
  9. 9. Adult Safeguarding Arrangements Adult Learning and Skills in Cambridgeshire County Council integrates a wide range of Adult Safeguarding services to ensure that Adult Safeguarding is embedded into the whole service to ensure that learners are safe If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 9
  10. 10. Integrated Adult Safeguarding Practices • Partnership working with County Council Adult Safeguarding Team • Adult Learning and Skills policy and procedures in place – on Wiki for tutors • Trained designated Adult Safeguarding officers If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 10
  11. 11. •Trained managers (two-days with resources folder) •Trained staff and tutors (short session with resources folder) •Staff working with vulnerable adults have an enhanced DBS check on recruitment •Informed learners (induction – statement of safety) •Ofsted inspection – evaluation and improvement
  12. 12. Adult Safeguarding is everyone’s business • Adult Safeguarding should not be thought of as a bolt on to the work you do, but seen as integral or central in all the work you do with individuals. • Adult Learning tutors have a Duty of Care for their learners. This duty is discharged by complying with the guidance on this course. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 12
  13. 13. Vulnerable Adults The official definition is all adults aged 18 and above who are or may be in need of community services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness and who are, or may be unable to take care of themselves, or unable to protect themselves against significant harm or exploitation. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 13
  14. 14. Adult learners rarely disclose a disability or learning difficulty when they enrol, so often there are vulnerable adults in classes who we don’t know about Any adult can become vulnerable at any time. For example as victims of domestic abuse, illness or family breakdown
  15. 15. The advice to tutors and other staff is that all adult learners are regarded as potentially vulnerable. This short on-line course is designed to give tutors knowledge about Adult Safeguarding, to raise awareness of their responsibility and to give basic skills in dealing with adult learners who display signs of abuse or disclose to the tutor or to other learners. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 15
  16. 16. What is abuse? Abuse is a violation of an individual’s human and civil rights by any other person or persons • Abuse may consist of single or repeated acts. • It may be an act of neglect or an omission to act. • Abuse can occur in any relationship and may result in significant harm to, or exploitation of, the person subjected to it. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 16
  17. 17. Categories and Indicators of Abuse 1. Physical abuse Physical abuse is abuse involving contact intended to cause feelings of intimidation, pain, injury, or other physical suffering or bodily harm. 2. Sexual abuse Sexual abuse is the forcing of undesired sexual behaviour by one person upon another, when that force falls short of being a sexual assault. The offender is referred to as a sexual abuser or (often pejoratively) molester. 3. Psychological abuse Psychological abuse, also referred to as emotional abuse or mental abuse, is a form of abuse characterised by a person subjecting or exposing another to behaviour that is psychologically harmful. Such abuse is often associated with situations of power imbalance, such as abusive relationships, bullying, child abuse and in the workplace. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 17
  18. 18. 4. Financial or material abuse Financial abuse is, for example, illegal or unauthorized use of a person’s property, money, pension book or other valuables (including changing the person's Will to name the abuser as heir), often fraudulently obtaining power of attorney, followed by deprivation of money or other property, or by eviction from own home. 5. Neglect and acts of omission Neglect is a passive form of abuse in which the perpetrator is responsible to provide care for a victim who is unable to care for oneself, but fails to provide adequate care to meet the victim's needs, thereby resulting in the victim's demise. 6. Discriminatory abuse Discriminatory abuse involves picking on or treating someone unfairly because something about them is different, for example ethnicity, age, disability, appearance, social class If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 18
  19. 19. 7. Poor professional practice Professional abuse is a failure to discharge professional responsibilities to a vulnerable adult. Professional abusers take advantage or their client’s or patient’s trust, exploit their vulnerability, do not act in their best interests, fail to keep professional boundaries, 8. Institutional abuse Institutional abuse can typically occur in a care home, nursing home, acute hospital or in-patient setting. It can be defined as any category of abuse that is part of the culture of the institution and is behaviour accepted as normal by staff. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 19
  20. 20. 9. Domestic violence abuse Domestic abuse can be broadly defined as a pattern of abusive behaviours by one or both partners in an intimate relationship such as marriage, dating, family, friends or cohabitation. Typically it can include physical violence, sexual abuse, emotional, financial, social, stalking, 10.Significant Harm Abuse causing serious harm including the impairment of, or an avoidable deterioration in, physical or mental health; and the impairment of physical, emotional, social or behavioural development". Real abuse cases are usually a mixture of different categories. For example domestic violence can also be one or all of physical, sexual or psychological abuse If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 20
  21. 21. The Adult Learning and Skills Service provides learning to hundreds of vulnerable adults with disabilities and learning difficulties within the Adults with Learning Difficulties and/or Disabilities (ALDD) and Family Learning programmes These learning programmes are specially designed to provide support for each learner according to their needs and are staffed by staff with specialist skills and knowledge The learning programmes for these adults typically prepares them for independent life and work, and improve reading, writing and maths in families. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 21
  22. 22. Around 80% of the 12,500 or so adults enrol in Community Learning adult learning classes in Cambridgeshire, including art and craft, exercise and sport and modern foreign languages If an adult enrolling on an CL class discloses a disability or learning difficulty on the enrolment form, the centre manager will make appropriate arrangements with the course tutor to support the learner, However, most learners with a disability or learning difficulties don’t disclose and start an CL course with no extra support and With the Centre Manager and tutor being unaware of any support needs. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 22
  23. 23. Tutors should be vigilant! At the start of the course and during the early sessions in particular look out for learners who appear to have characteristics of vulnerable adults If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 23
  24. 24. Who are we wanting to safeguard? All adult learners but particularly: Older adults who are frail They may be more likely to fall, get injured, ill or overstretch themselves physically and mentally to keep up with others. Seeing and hearing may be more difficult. They could be suffering from Dementia If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 24
  25. 25. Mental ill-health Adults with mental health difficulties do enrol for courses often without disclosing their condition because they feel it has no relevance to their attendance in the class. This happens regularly particularly in art, craft and exercise classes which are recognised for improving poor mental health
  26. 26. Adults with physical disabilities These learners will often disclose because their disability can be visible. Centre managers will ensure that these learners have good physical access to classrooms, e.g. by ensuring wheelchair access. A Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP) will be put in place, to ensure safe evacuation in the event of an emergency such as a fire If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 26
  27. 27. Adults with sensory impairments These adults may just need to sit nearer the front so that they can hear or see better. A hearing loop can be provided for learners with hearing impairment, and there are special accessibility facilities on computers for learners with impaired sight. Tutors may want to ensure that audio is loud and font sizes are large on Power Point, or on handouts (minimum font size 12). If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 27
  28. 28. Adults with learning difficulties This definition covers a wide range. Most likely tutors will encounter learners who have difficulty with reading, writing and/or maths. Depending on the subject and the level of the learning difficulty this may or not impair learning. For example Dyslexia could impair learning in creative writing but possibly not in an exercise class. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 28
  29. 29. Adults who misuse substances Alcohol and drug abuse are on the increase. No learner is likely to disclose such a problem on enrolment. However reports of intoxicated learners happen occasionally, and the tutor has a duty of care to all learners during the class . If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 29
  30. 30. Adults whose behaviour or condition puts them at risk of abuse Again this definition covers a wide range. Some people have unusual personalities; they may talk a lot or speak at a particular pitch; speak with a foreign accent or regional dialect; have unusual or awkward body language, dress differently, have a visible disability etc. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 30
  31. 31. All adult learners can be vulnerable and can suffer abuse Where abuse is suspected, discovered or disclosed it must be recorded & reported to the Centre Manager, member of staff on duty or the Designated Adult Safeguarding Officer – contact details in resources folder If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 31
  32. 32. Possible abuse – what a tutor might observe physical and emotional/behavioral indicators such as: Reoccurring bruising - new bruises turning yellow with new ones appearing •Body language changing substantially from open and confident to closed and withdrawn •Hearing a learner using discriminatory language targeted on another learner •Seeing a learner upset after verbal or physical contact with another •See a learner recoiling after being touched by another. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  33. 33.  Overhear a learner making a sexually explicit remark to another, who reacts badly • See learners arguing where one gives the other money or property • One learner or learners push or strike another • Disclosure - a learner approach another learner or the tutor in distress and ask for help with a possible case of abuse. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  34. 34. What you should do Try to meet the learner after the class in a quiet place using the advice on interviews given on later slides here If it is not possible to meet the learner or you would prefer not to, you must report the situation to your centre manager, member of staff on duty or the Designated Adult Safeguarding Officer – contact details in resources folder If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  35. 35. If you think that the learner is in immediate danger of serious harm! phone the Police on 999 You will not be criticised for a false alarm If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  36. 36. Talking to a learner who has disclosed (1) • Take notes / make notes – incident report form • Talk to your learner as quickly as possible after event • Ask learner to Tell, Explain, Describe (TED) – free narrative and free recall • Tell learner in their interest you might not be able to keep what they tell you to yourself. In this situation you have a duty of care and must report this incident to your centre manager or designated Adult Safeguarding officer. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 36
  37. 37. Talking to a learner who has disclosed (2) • Record what the person asked and what they said in their words • Try to use open questions and avoid leading questions • Avoid complex and multiple questions • Consider acquiescence and positive bias on part of person • Speak to learner individually – in discrete, secure place • If you judge the learner is in immediate danger of serious harm call the police on 999 If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  38. 38. Be Mindful When you talk to a learner who has disclosed possible abuse, or you think could be a victim of abuse, you need to be aware of the sorts of feelings and fears they may have. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 38
  39. 39. A possible victim of abuse may •Be too ashamed and embarrassed to speak about their experience •Be unable to leave a situation, due to coercion • Have a lack of understanding of who can help •Don’t know their experience is abusive •Believe they are trapped - there are no options • Need the support of their abuser and wish to stay with them
  40. 40. What happens next? • After you have reported the situation, you may not be involved any further as the Designated Adult Safeguarding Officer will work with Adult Social Care to investigate • However it is possible that you will be interviewed as part of an investigation If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 40
  41. 41. E Safety/E Adult Safeguarding If you are teaching ICT, e-safety should be built into your course content; particularly if you know you are teaching vulnerable adults. If you are using the internet in the classroom, or encouraging learners to go online outside of the classroom, you need to ensure that your learners have an awareness of e-safety issues. Please use the E-Safety Practice Guidance in your folder
  42. 42. Be assured you will receive all the support you need from your Centre Manager, the Designated Adult Safeguarding Officer and Adult Social Care staff. You will never be criticised for any action you have taken that complies with these guidelines
  43. 43. Fictional Case Studies In Adult Learning If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 43
  44. 44. Case Study 1 – Ballroom dancing A ballroom class attracts mainly couples. One particular couple has caught the eye of the tutor because of unusual behaviour. They were regular attendees, but when practising the dancing in the class, the couple constantly bickered and on one occasion the tutor saw the man violently push the woman (Grace) away. She looked embarrassed but quickly resumed her stance with her partner as if nothing had happened. In the 3rd week of the class, the tutor noticed some bruising around the women’s eyes, and she looked particular despondent. On the 4th week unusually for her, the woman was wearing trousers and had a slight limp. The tutor light heartedly commented on this to which Grace dropped her head and mumbled something about a trip. Subsequent lessons brought more signs of “accidents”, like a cut eye and bruised had. It was now week 7. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  45. 45. Case Study 2 – Exercise class In an exercise class an adult learner with learning disabilities (Bridget) enrolled with her Mother. Bridget’s health check showed that she was fine to do the exercise in the class, as she had no physical disabilities etc. The Centre Manager had no record on Bridget’s condition and the disability box had not been ticked on the enrolment form. During a break, Bridget made a beeline for the Tutor to chat. During the conversation Bridget said “my Nana gives me £5 every week but my mum nicks it for cigarettes” If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  46. 46. Case Study 3 – Horticulture class A Centre Manager (Miriam) is checking the classes on the first night of the Adult Education programme. She looks outside at the Horticulture class which was having its first practical session in the school’s allotment. The tutor was a young enthusiastic woman (Jill) who worked full time during the day as a landscape gardener, but was still receiving care for a mental health problem. Miriam was aware of Jill’s condition and was happy to employ her and contribute to her recovery which was advanced. Miriam decided to watch for a while out of sight of the learners. To her horror Miriam witnessed two of the male learners making sexual gesticulations behind Jill’s back. Although Jill could not see what was going on she sensed something from the body language of the learners she could see, and looked confused and uncomfortable. Miriam decided not to do anything about this. The day before the third class, Jill phoned Miriam and resigned. Her speech was slurred and she sounded in great distress, although she would give no reason for her resignation. If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder
  47. 47. Do you now … • Understand why staff in Adult Learning have to implement Adult Safeguarding • Know the procedures for implementing Adult Safeguarding within adult learning • Have developed skills in recognising and managing Adult Safeguarding situations If in doubt about a Adult Safeguarding issue talk to your centre manager or use the contact details in your resources folder 47
  48. 48. Please complete the assessment questionnaire

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