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Choosy Content Folks
Choose Accessible GIFs
Principles of Web Accessibility
YES! We can access this content!
Meet PEAT
Example
Seizure and
neurological
disorders
Deaf and
hard of
hearing
Color blindness
Cognitive and
mental health
impairments
Blindn...
Other non-disability considerations
● Functional accessibility
(compatibility with assistive
technologies)
● Aging/Older
P...
Roles
The
content
marketer
The
Accessibility
Expert
The
Developer
Roles
● Content managers: Describe the animated content sufficiently in text
● Developers or Accessibility Experts: Ensure...
Consider
Is it useful?
Does the image(s) add to the content or detract from your message?
Is the content in plain language...
Reminder List for GIFs:
● Ensure animated content is sufficiently described
in text
● Ensure elements blink or flash are i...
Resources for other animation
● Content: http://www.4syllables.com.au/
● Infographics and Animation:
http://webaim.org/res...
Questions?
victoria.wales@gsa.gov
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Accessibility for Animated Gifs

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From "Sharing the Essentials of Animated Gifs for Public Services" webinar.
By Victoria Wales USA.gov and GobiernoUSA.gov

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Accessibility for Animated Gifs

  1. 1. Choosy Content Folks Choose Accessible GIFs
  2. 2. Principles of Web Accessibility YES! We can access this content!
  3. 3. Meet PEAT Example
  4. 4. Seizure and neurological disorders Deaf and hard of hearing Color blindness Cognitive and mental health impairments Blindness, low- vision, other visual impairments Motor impairments Disability Types
  5. 5. Other non-disability considerations ● Functional accessibility (compatibility with assistive technologies) ● Aging/Older Persons/Seniors ● Old equipment or devices ● Low-literacy ● Low-language proficiency ● Dyslexia, ADD/ADHD ● Autism/Asperger syndrome
  6. 6. Roles The content marketer The Accessibility Expert The Developer
  7. 7. Roles ● Content managers: Describe the animated content sufficiently in text ● Developers or Accessibility Experts: Ensure elements blink or flash is in a safe threshold - use PEAT ● Developers: Avoid using the marquee element ● Content managers Where possible, provide a non-animated equivalent or method to skip the animation and get to the content Also see: Best practices in Animation
  8. 8. Consider Is it useful? Does the image(s) add to the content or detract from your message? Is the content in plain language? Is there a non-animated equivalent you can use? Quality vs. Quantity do the images compete for the audience’s attention? Should this be translated or adapted to another language?
  9. 9. Reminder List for GIFs: ● Ensure animated content is sufficiently described in text ● Ensure elements blink or flash are in a safe threshold - use PEAT ● Ensure the marquee element is avoided ● Where possible, provide a non-animated equivalent or method to skip the animation and get to the content
  10. 10. Resources for other animation ● Content: http://www.4syllables.com.au/ ● Infographics and Animation: http://webaim.org/resources/designers/ ● Video: https://www.digitalgov.gov/2014/06/30/508-accessible- videos-why-and-how-to-make-them/ and an example from Kids.gov ● PEAT: Photosensitive Epilepsy Analysis Tool ● Accessibility Testing Information: http://trace.wisc.edu/peat/ ● Best Practices in Animation: https://www.webaccessibility.com/best_practices.php?technolog y_platform_id=11
  11. 11. Questions? victoria.wales@gsa.gov

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