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Dude, where's my car? The "complicated" relationship between the automotive industry and Millennials

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We surveyed over 32,000 millennials, drilling deeply into the wider macro trends, to understand the current and future attitudes and behaviours of young people to mobility.
Do they want to own a car? Would they prefer to share through a car club? Do they want to learn to drive? Or does Uber and a future of driverless cars mean millennials can now spend their driving lessons fund on something else? Find out here.

Published in: Automotive
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Dude, where's my car? The "complicated" relationship between the automotive industry and Millennials

  1. 1. Dude, where’s my car? The “complicated” relationship between the automotive industry and Millennials. [SEXY FRONT COVER ARRIVING ON MONDAY MORNING] Dude, where’s my car? The “complicated” relationship between the automotive industry and Millennials
  2. 2. “If the trends seen in this report become reality, a business based purely on production and volume sales will fail. Traditional OEMs must become service-based businesses to thrive. The Spotify and Netflix generation is as comfortable sharing and subscribing to their driving options as they are to their entertainment. Smart players will place equal emphasis on monetising services as they will innovating their product range. In almost every sector the 21st Century has seen the manufacturing giants of the 20th overtaken by nimbler, more forward thinking competitors. Will Toyota and Ford go the same way as Kodak and Nokia? Or will they have the courage to balance an increasingly out-dated model with something fit for the next 100 years?” Kate Cooper, Chief Strategy Officer, Different Spin and Bloom Worldwide
  3. 3. Foreword I have a confession. I am 31 years old and I can’t drive. I don’t have a car, I don’t have a driving licence. I’ve never had a driving lesson. The closest I’ve got is stalling an old boyfriend’s Golf in a supermarket car park. Or maybe that time I went go karting. Or my vast experience playing Mario Kart 64. Suffice to say, I should not be allowed behind the wheel. Now I’m at a stage where I could comfortably afford to learn to drive, I just don’t want to. To be honest, the thought scares me. Maybe I have left it too late and I’m now too risk averse. But if the necessity was there I could probably get over it. The truth is, I don’t feel the necessity. I don’t feel like I’m missing out, apart from the rare occasion when I think it would be a great idea to go to a safari park. That’s quite a tricky experience without a car. Ambivalent as I am about personally driving, I am equally as passionate about technology and innovation. I have been working with amazing clients in the automotive sector for the last four years and have been amazed at the developments in engineering and technology that have happened in that short time. One of the things I wanted to find out was whether as a millennial I am alone in my ambivalence to driving and, if not, what this means for the future of mobility. Perhaps soon I’ll be able to take a driverless car to the safari park. Laura Dinneen, Research and Insight Partner, Different Spin and Bloom Worldwide #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 3
  4. 4. #DifferentSpin Join the conversation StoryStream is an intelligent content marketing platform that enables brands to discover and publish their branded, user-generated and third party editorial content beautifully, to any screen. Their technology is used by global automotive brands to create relevant, trusted and authentic customer experiences. We are using StoryStream to tell the story of this research. To enrich your experience and understanding of both the Millennials audience and the conversation and debate around the future of mobility. Join the conversation by using #DifferentSpin across Twitter and Instagram, and see your commentary featured on our live wall at Different-Spin.com #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 4
  5. 5. Contents Introduction Page 06 Millennials now Page 14 Millennials soon Page 28 Millennials in the future Page 39 What does this mean for automotive? Page 54 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 5
  6. 6. Section one Introduction A Different Spin Methodology Executive summary #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 6
  7. 7. A Different Spin Different Spin is an automotive engagement and innovation lab founded by Bloom Worldwide. We enable traditional players to innovate and new entrants to compete. We are a heady but dynamic mix of commercial strategists, data geeks, futurologists, technologists, designers, creatives and producers working across 5 countries. We provide a different spin on automotive. different-spin.com // bloomworldwide.com RETAIL INNOVATION ENGAGEMENT SERVICES MARCOMS INNOVATION PRODUCT & SERVICE INNOVATION STRATEGIC INNOVATION EDUCATION & INSPIRATION RESEARCH & INSIGHT #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 7
  8. 8. Methodology DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this research we focus on Millennials aged 19-34 years-old in the UK. Some charts in this report include different age groupings, where the data is from external sources e.g. National Travel Survey and we have been unable to obtain data in different formats. All charts are clearly labelled and sourced. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY We used a combination of quantitative and qualitative research approaches to create this report with a total sample size of 33,521. 1.  Audience profiling through GlobalWebIndex survey data from a representative sample of UK internet users. 2.  Deep dive research panel of UK Millennials 3.  Reevoo Car Buyers Panel survey 4.  Analysis of publically available data on driving trends in the UK Further detail on methodology is provided at the end of the report. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 8
  9. 9. Methodology URBAN / RURAL PARTICIPANTS Within the Millennial segment, we included viewpoints from both urban, suburban and rural participants. Each research approach used a representative sample of Millennials across these three categories, with emphasis placed on urban and suburban over rural to reflect dwelling trends amongst UK Millennials in real life. As expected there were differences in current transport habits, with more rural and suburban Millennials owning cars and relying less heavily on public transport or services like Uber and City Car Club. However attitudes towards the future of mobility and technology innovations were less defined between urban and rural. The low availability of certain services in rural areas now does not mean there isn’t demand for the future. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 9
  10. 10. Executive summary INNOVATION IS KING So first to answer the BIG question. As the next generation of car buyers, will Millennials actually buy cars? In short YES, but not as we know it.  The Spotify and Netflix generation is as comfortable sharing and subscribing to their driving options as they are to their entertainment. Smart players will place equal emphasis on monetising services as they will innovating their product range. And it’s this that is important for both traditional OEMs and new entrants to understand. It’s these nascent trends we’re seeing in the Millennial generation that tell us where the automotive and mobility sector is headed. One thing is clear: innovation is king. If the trends seen in this report become reality, a business based purely on production and volume sales will fail. Traditional OEMs must become service-based businesses to thrive. Our goal in openly publishing both this and upcoming research projects is to accelerate innovation and change in the automotive industry. “Peak oil has already happened.” Nicholas, 33 “In ten years, I believe our traditional means of transport will not be used anymore.” Melanie, 19 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 10
  11. 11. Executive summary: Millennials now CAN’T DRIVE, WON’T DRIVE Many of the Millennials in our study that do hold a full driving licence choose not to own a car and rarely drive. There are a number of reasons for this but primarily it is because they simply don’t need to. Millennials in the city are less dependent on driving because there are more alternatives. They ask people to give them lifts, they have taxi apps on their phones and Google Maps in their pockets to help get around on foot or public transport. Learning to drive and owning a car is less of a rite of passage for many Millennials. There are other things fighting for their money and time, and other priorities in their lives. Committing to car ownership is a burden for many Millennials, who favour financial freedom over driving freedom. They aren’t comfortable putting themselves in debt in order to own a car. Of those that do own cars, many wouldn't change their lifestyles to own a more expensive or newer model. “Owning a car used to be a symbol of freedom. Whilst it still is, it has definitely also become a heavyweight financial burden.” Melissa, 27 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 11
  12. 12. Executive summary: Millennials soon ACCESS OVER OWNERSHIP With the rise of car sharing options available to Millennials living in the city, ownership is not the only way to drive. For both financial, practical and environmental reasons (in that order), Millennials are choosing to experiment with shared ownership or short-term rental clubs. Car ownership is becoming less of an aspiration and less of a norm for Millennials, who are much more acclimatised to subscription services and access over ownership. The Spotify and Netflix generation is as comfortable sharing and subscribing to their driving options as they are to their entertainment. Owning the coolest car on the block is an aspiration for some Millennials, but this aspiration is becoming diluted by newer goals in life. Owning the newest iPhone, starting a business, going travelling and moving to the city are examples of goals that take priority over car ownership for today’s Millennials. The idea of car ownership is not lost - many Millennials talk about owning a car in the future - but there are many other options for mobility today, which means car ownership can be put off for now. “Travel will be more collaborative, more shared. I think the focus will be less on full ownership…younger generations are less bothered about owning stuff.” Nicole, 34 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 12
  13. 13. Executive summary: Millennials in the future SO LAST CENTURY Throughout the research, we found that Millennials recognised the need for change and disruption in the auto industry. They hold a belief that traditional and long standing brands will have to innovate and disrupt themselves in order to survive in a market that is changing rapidly. When we asked Millennials which brands they thought would be leading the automotive industry in 10 years’ time, brands that stood out were: Uber, Tesla, Google, BMW, Apple and Toyota. In the same task we asked Millennials to pin the companies they considered to be the most innovative. The results were almost exactly the same. It is clear that a perception of innovation for Millennials equals long-term success. Automotives: are you up to the challenge? “Most journeys are taken by an individual, making cars a wasteful use of space and resources - I'd like to see this tackled. Perhaps a hybrid of on- demand single person driverless vehicles and improved automated rapid mass transport.” Khal, 34 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 13
  14. 14. Section two Millennials now Daily travel Car ownership Car purchasing Car brands #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 14
  15. 15. How do you travel day-to-day? Participants were asked to upload photos/images of the modes of transportation they use to get around on a day-to-day basis.
  16. 16. Millennials now: daily travel routines PUBLIC TRANSPORT RULES PUBLIC TRANSPORT IS RELIED ON Where it’s good and available, Millennials choose public transport over driving for their daily commute to work/school. 65% of Millennials favour public or self-powered transport for their day-to-day travel, compared to 22% who regularly drive or ride their own vehicle. CAR SHAMING When they talked about having to drive, Millennials appeared almost apologetic that they couldn’t walk or take public transport. They are much prouder of walking or cycling than they are of driving. MULTITASKING TRAVELLERS One of the bonuses of public transport that Millennials mention is the ability to do other things when travelling. They talked about being able to use their phone, watch videos, play games and even (shocker) get some work done. Car/van 19% Bus 18% Walk/run 16% Train 13% Underground 10% Cycle 8% Taxi 8% Uber 5% Motorbike/ scooter 3% Figure 1: How do you travel? Hark participants were asked to upload photos/images of the modes of transportation they use to get around on a day-to-day basis. Source: Hark by Different Spin. 2015. PUBLIC TRANSPORT (41%) SELF-POWERED (24%) PERSONAL AUTO (22%) PRIVATE HIRE (13%) #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 16
  17. 17. Millennials now: daily travel routines MILLENNIALS TAKE FEWER CAR TRIPS SO OVER CAR TRIPS Since 1997, the average number of car trips made by drivers aged 17-29 has fallen by 42%. Now, the average Millennial drives a car, van or motorcycle approximately 530 times a year. Trips as a passenger are also declining, although not at such a dramatic rate, with 25% fewer journeys being taken now compared to 1997. MONEY MONEY MONEY Participants cite money as the number one reason for driving less. Millennials say it’s just too darn expensive to own a car these days, and public transport is a cheaper and easier option. Other costs of living and the pressure to pay off student debts or save for a deposit on a house are prioritised above paying to drive. Figure 2: Average number of trips by age, gender and main mode. Trips per person per year, displaying data for 17-29 year olds. Source: Department for Transport, National Travel Survey, 2015. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1997 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Personal auto driver Personal auto passenger #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 17
  18. 18. Millennials now: daily travel routines CARS ARE USED TO SERVE A PURPOSE FUNCTION OVER FUN Most Millennials would rather not drive, but some of them have to. Those that do drive gave us very functional reasons for doing so. The top reasons given included transporting large or heavy objects, carrying lots of passengers, and travelling to different sites as part of their job. THE LAST RESORT Millennials that do regularly drive do so out of necessity rather than desire. Country folk talk about having to drive because local bus services aren't up to scratch, and others drive because they need to cart equipment around. “Freedom for me would be being able to go where I want in whatever way I want. For me, that would be public transport because it’s cheaper and I don't have to worry about maintaining it.” Laura, 24 “I drive for convenience, sometimes because I have a lot of stuff to take and sometimes because where I'm going is far away and public transport is complicated or expensive.” Natalie, 22 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 18
  19. 19. Millennials now: car ownership PERSONAL OWNERSHIP IS DECLINING NOT MINE, GUV The percentage of 17-29 year olds that own a car where they are the main driver is slowly declining. In 2007, 42% of this age group were owner drivers, but this has fallen to 36% over the seven years – that’s almost a 1% drop every year. The picture is different for older drivers, who have much higher ownership levels and are nearly twice as likely to own a car than 17-29 year olds. The 50-69 age group are slowly upping their ownership levels to 66% in 2014, however ownership amongst the 30-49 age group is slightly lowering. Figure 3: Adult personal car access by age, England. The chart shows the percentage of each age group that own a car of which they are the main driver. Source: Department for Transport, National Travel Survey, 2015. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 17-29 30-49 50-69 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 19
  20. 20. Millennials now: car ownership CAN’T DRIVE, WON’T DRIVE NO NEED, THNX Many of the Millennials in our study that do hold a full driving licence choose not to own a car and rarely drive. There are a number of reasons for this but primarily it is because they simply don’t need to. Millennials in the city are less dependent on driving because there are more alternative options. They have people to give them lifts, taxi apps on their phones, and Google Maps in their pockets to help them get around on foot or on public transport. NOT WORTH MY TIME Learning to drive and owning a car is less of a rite of passage for many. There are other priorities fighting for their money and time. TOO MUCH OF A NIGHTMARE Some Millennials don’t drive because they really don’t want to. The thought of getting behind the wheel or facing London traffic and congestion charges stresses them out. FREEDOM OR FINANCIAL BURDEN? Interestingly some respondents said that they feel more mobile without owning a car, citing car sharing services as more flexible, freer options. Committing to the financial burden of car ownership is too much of a restriction for many Millennials who favour financial freedom over driving freedom. They aren’t comfortable putting themselves in debt just to own a car. Of those that do own, many didn’t want to change their lifestyles to own a more expensive or newer car. “I think the days of traditionally like 'you’re gonna finish school you're gonna go to college, you're gonna start driving at 17...' I think people have more interesting things to do now. It's not necessarily the stepping stone to adulthood it used to be.” Nicole, 34 “Realistically I don't see myself owning a car for a long time because I just don't need to. if I want to I can rent it for the weekend or to get across town I can use uber. I don't see myself having a commute, I don't have kids. I don't need one.” Sam, 25 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 20
  21. 21. “Owning a car used to be a symbol of freedom. Whilst it still is, it has definitely also become a heavyweight financial burden.” Melissa, 27 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 21
  22. 22. Millennials now: car ownership MILLENNIALS ARE BUYING FEWER CARS DUDE, WHERE’S MY CAR? When asked about their car purchasing history, 40% of Millennials said that they do not currently own a car. The percentage of 19-34 year olds that don’t have a car has been increasing since 2009, rising from 28% of carless Millennials. In fact, Millennials are more likely to own a vacuum cleaner than a car. But all is not lost – 7% of UK Millennials said that they were planning to buy a car within the next six months. This figure has remained fairly consistent over the course of the research, from the 6% 19-34 year olds who said they were intending to buy a car in 2009. Figure 4: Percentage of UK internet-using Millennials (19-34) that do not own a car/automobile. Source: GlobalWebIndex, 2015. 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Q32009 Q42009 Q12010 Q22010 Q32010 Q42010 Q12011 Q22011 Q32011 Q42011 Q12012 Q22012 Q32012 Q42012 Q12013 Q22013 Q32013 Q42013 Q12014 Q22014 Q32014 Q42014 Q12015 Q22015 Q32015 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 22
  23. 23. Millennials now: car ownership FEWER MILLENNIALS HOLD LICENCES LICENCE TO MEH The percentage of full car licence holders amongst Millennials is falling, whilst for those aged 40 and over (and especially the 70+ age group) the percentage of licensees is increasing or holding firm. The proportion of 17-20 year olds with a licence has fallen from 48% in 1994 to 29% in 2014. The trend is similar for the older Millennials too, although not quite as pronounced, falling from 75% in 1994 to 63% in 2014. CHEERS, BOOMERS The cost of learning to drive is a huge barrier for Millennials. They talk about holding off until they have a better income to pay for the lessons and tests. It is understood that most people fail, which means forking out for re-sits. If they can’t practise in a parent or partner’s car in it can be more effective to take an intensive course, but that means saving up for a very long time. Figure 5: Full car driving licence holders by age, England. Chart shows the percentage of each age group with a full car driving licence. Source: Department for Transport, National Travel Survey, 2015. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 17-20 21-29 30-39 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 23
  24. 24. Millennials now: car purchasing TOP BUYING CONSIDERATIONS COST LEAST IMPORTANT MOST IMPORTANT FUEL EFFICIENCY RELIABILITY SIZEBOOT SPACE SAFETY ECO DESIGN SPEED TECH MONEY PRACTICALITY PEACE OF MIND LOOK AND FEEL Figure 6: Millennials’ top considerations for buying a new/used car in the current time. Position and size of bubble relate to the level of importance UK Millennials place on each factor. Source: Hark UK Millennials Panel by Different Spin, 2015. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 24
  25. 25. Millennials now: car purchasing BANGERS OVER BMWS TRUST THY NEIGHBOUR When it comes to buying a car, Millennials place the most trust in the testimonials of friends and family that have bought cars before. They may use social media to do this, but it’s their close ties they trust. BOY RACERS BEWARE In fact, Millennials are incredibly practical when thinking about what they want from a car, naming cost, fuel efficiency and safety as top priorities. Driving experience, speed, handling are all at the bottom of the list. Bonus points if it looks cute too. SHABBY CHIC Is it preferable to buy a busted up little banger than a luxury convertible? Many Millennials seem to think so. Shoddy looks are actually a bonus. “I would never buy a luxury vehicle - like an Audi, BMW or Mercedes - because the maintenance costs would be extortionate. I could only afford a small car made by someone like Vauxhall or Peugeot.” Carrie, 29 “Right now, if I were to buy a car it would have a to be a small, cheap second-hand one - probably over 10 years old. Running costs - parking, petrol, insurance etc. would be main concerns. Colour and appearance would be very much secondary influences.” Jackson, 25 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 25
  26. 26. Millennials now: car brands URBAN INFLUENCERS KEEP IT COMPACT Millennials show a distinct preference for smaller cars, ideal for nipping around their typically urban environments and squeezing into inevitably small parking spaces. FAMILY VALUES Preference for specific car brands tends to be family wide, as affinity is built over time for a reliable family car. This trait in Millennials is also formed as a result of driving cars that belong to parents or other family members. A similar trend is seen in vehicle brands used by friends or at work but this is less defined. THE MINI COOPER EFFECT Despite changing their look and feel over the past few years, many Millennial females still feel a particularly strong affinity for the Mini Cooper. They appreciate the focus on design rather than technical specifications of the car. Figure 7: which of these brands have you used for your transportation needs in the past month? Source: Hark UK Millennials Panel by Different Spin, 2015. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 26
  27. 27. Millennials now: car brands FOCUS ON UBER SERVING THE ON-DEMAND GENERATION Millennials are currently big fans of Uber, praising its convenience and cheaper prices. When comparing Uber to traditional cabs, they love that the cars are almost instant, reducing the time sent waiting in the cold. For them the whole customer experience from booking through to destination just works. PREDICTING BIG THINGS Millennials are confident that they will use Uber more in the future and that the business will continue to grow, although some worry about its long-term global stability, referencing regulation issues. GOT THE KNOWLEDGE? The major criticism when comparing to traditional black cabs is that the drivers in London particularly, lack the local navigational knowledge. Some Millennials are also concerned over the bad press and controversy surrounding the company. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 27 “I’ve only read the negative press around Uber and it doesn’t sound like something that is regulated enough.” Nicole, 34 “I always liked the reassurance of 'the knowledge' etc. but in the last 6 months or so I think it's been a split between the two - the convenience and cost of Uber is beginning to outweigh the benefits of black cabs.” Jackson, 25 “Assuming there aren’t any high profile failures, which I think could kill the brand, I can see more companies pairing up with Uber making it bigger than it currently is.” Natalie, 22
  28. 28. Section three Millennials soon Car sharing Electric and hybrid Insurance innovation Semi-autonomous technology #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 28
  29. 29. Millennials soon: car sharing THE RISE OF CAR SHARING SERVICES CITY CAR CLUB BOOM We spoke to Gemma Flynn at City Car Club about the changes they’re seeing in their customer base, and whether there were any distinct trends relating to Millennials. The answer was yes! Millennials currently make up 35% of City Car Club’s total personal members. But if you look at approved personal applications over time, the 19-34 age group is steadily gaining a much higher percentage share of the car club’s membership base. In 2010 just 21% of approved personal applications were made by 19-34 year olds. Now in 2015 so far this same age group has nearly doubled their share, accounting for just over 40% of approved personal applications. Based on this pattern, City Car Club expects Millennials to become the majority customer group within the next five years. Figure 8: Approved personal applications to City Car Club. This chart shows the percentage of all approved applications made by 19-34 year olds versus everyone else. The 2015 figure is year to date. Source: City Car Club, 2015. 21% 25% 31% 26% 33% 40% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 19-34 year olds Everyone else #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 29
  30. 30. “In 10 years time travel will be more collaborative, more shared. I think the focus will be less on full ownership…younger generations are less bothered about owning stuff” Nicole, 34 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 30
  31. 31. Millennials soon: car sharing ACCESS OVER OWNERSHIP “I think younger generations value experience rather than ownership. Look at Snapchat - they value the moment that day, rather than having a history (such as history/posts/photos on their Facebook wall). In my opinion they like to experience and share the moments than to own things.” Ayako, 25 “Whilst having at car as a young person can be seen as cool and even 'grown up' most young people get by without and with the abundance of new luxury goods available for them to wish for cars are taking a back seat as unaffordable luxuries compared to the latest computers, phones and tablets.” Emily, 19 MOANING ABOUT OWNING With the rise of car sharing options available to Millennials living in the city, ownership is not the only way to drive. For both financial, practical and environmental reasons (in that order), Millennials are choosing to experiment with shared ownership or short-term rental clubs. Car ownership is becoming less of an aspiration and less of a norm for Millennials, who are much more acclimatised to subscription services and access over ownership. The Spotify and Netflix generation is as comfortable sharing and subscribing to their driving options as they are to their entertainment. OTHER THINGS TO LUST AFTER Owning the coolest car on the block is an aspiration for some Millennials, but this aspiration is becoming diluted by newer goals in life. Owning the newest iPhone, starting a business, going travelling and moving to the city are all examples of goals that are taking priority over car ownership for today’s Millennials. IDEA OVER REALITY The idea of car ownership is not lost - many Millennials talk about owning a car in the future - but the reality is that they have other options for mobility today, which means they can put off car ownership for now. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 31
  32. 32. Millennials soon: car sharing case study CITY CAR CLUB #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 32 City Car Club was founded in 2005 with the aim of changing the way people think about travel. They provide short term car rentals on a subscription based service, giving city dwellers the option to pick up cars parked in designated spaces wherever they are around the city. Despite running a business rooted in cars, City Car Club actually want to reduce car usage, by moving people away from car ownership and giving them a simple way to only use cars when they really need to. City Car Club gives people an economical and environmentally sustainable alternative to car ownership, which fits around their lifestyle. One of the primary barriers to car ownership for Millennials is the financial burden and general hassle of additional costs such as breakdown cover, fuel, repairs, servicing, MOTs and insurance. By using City Car Club, drivers can sidestep all of these potential problems as they are all already covered within the membership and rental costs. For the younger end of the Millennial demographic, City Car Club also offers a discounted rate for those aged between 19 and 22. City Car Club allows Millennials all the benefits of using a car when they need to without any of the hassles of ownership. As more and more people move away from ownership, this is the kind of smart product solution that this generation needs.
  33. 33. Millennials soon: electric and hybrid vehicles SURELY IT’S ABOUT TIME? BACK TO THE FUTURE When asked about the future of the automotive industry, wider use and improved infrastructure for electric and hybrid vehicles was high on the list for our Millennials. Along with hover boards. ENVIRONMENT IS ON THE RADAR When talking about which features of a car would be important to them, environmental impact is high on the list for Millennials. A LONG ROAD AHEAD Whilst Millennials maintain a positive outlook for EVs and Hybrids, they acknowledge that there is a difficult road ahead to get buy in from governments on a larger scale, battling the goliath of the oil industry and concerns around range and infrastructure. Figure 9: “Definitely electric cars” by Natalie, 22. Natalie imagines what cars might look like in the future, powered by electricity and featuring plenty of new and exciting tech including self drive options and highly accurate traffic maps. Source: Hark UK Millennials Panel by Different Spin, 2015. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 33
  34. 34. “Yeah I would definitely do black box insurance. I think it’s really good because then you’re rewarding people for driving safely...” Rebecca, 22 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 34
  35. 35. Millennials soon: insurance innovation PREMIUM PREJUDICE “I'd looked into getting a car, but it's not the vehicle price that put me off, it was the insurance. I was happy to drive a used car for less than a grand, but the insurance was more than double that on top. Yowza.” Clarence, 33 A NECESSARY EVIL Millennials consider the cost of running a car to be a major barrier to ownership and insurance represents a significant chunk. They dislike the high rates associated with their age and are interested in solutions that can combat this. A NEW WAY TO BUY Millennials are less likely to manually shop around for the best policy and go direct to insurers. Instead, they use comparison sites, meaning there is more of an emphasis on upfront cost than details of an individual policy. BLACK BOX INSURANCE The majority of Millennials are aware of black box insurance solutions and believe it a good idea to lower insurance costs for younger drivers. Many said they would consider using it but others raised issues they had with the technology. The most common were concerns that it might restrict them in cases where they might ‘bend the rules’ with regards to speed limits and the like. They believed that the technology would be removing their freedom to make their own judgement, even when that judgement might mean breaking the law. Some participants doubted the intelligence of the technology when it came to the behaviour of other drivers, expressing concern that blame might be placed on them for harsh braking when another driver was at fault. Some participants acknowledged the lack of privacy, or ‘big brother’ aspect of black box insurance. Although interestingly, this appears to be less of a concern. “I have heard of it. My brain says you should get that but my heart says no because I like to drive fast.” Hannah, 22 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 35
  36. 36. Millennials soon: semi-autonomous technology SAFETY FIRST GETTING A SEMI Our Millennials were quite excited by the potential life- saving and annoyance-busting benefits of semi autonomous safety technology. We showed them seven different semi-autonomous features, asking them to select up to three that sounded most important or advantageous, and provide comments on each. Many of these features are currently available as options when buying new premium cars, or else they are in development for release within the next three years. Some members of our panel have had first-hand experience driving cars with one or more of these features, whilst others were not aware of them at all. First and foremost they picked the features they thought could save the most lives. The results are on the following page. Adaptive cruise control Car automatically speeds up and slows down to keep pace with the car in front of you. Parking assist Car uses cameras and sensors to judge the size of the parking space and steer its way into the space. Adaptive headlights Headlights automatically turn their beams around bends in the road to light the path you’re steering into. Switches automatically between high and low beam. Lane departure prevention Car automatically corrects itself if you start to veer outside of your lane without intending to. Blind spot detector Sensor device that detects other vehicles located to the driver’s side and rear. Warnings can be visual, audible, vibrating or tactile. Forward collision avoidance Your car uses radars or lasers to detect imminent crashes and automatically brakes or steers you out the way to avoid hitting anything. Fatigue detection Your car uses in-seat heart rate and respiratory tracking to detect if the driver is becoming drowsy. It will send an alert to wake you up. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 36
  37. 37. Millennials soon: semi-autonomous technology SCARED OF BLIND SPOTS SAVE MORE LIVES Millennials named blind spot detection as the most important semi-autonomous technology feature. They recognise that there is a limit to the human body and that, aside from redesigning human vision, the next best thing is getting technology to help solve this big and very real problem for young drivers. Participants picked this as their most important feature because they believed it would help save lives. They are aware and scared of the potential danger of the blind spot, and some speak from personal experience of accidents caused by this. ADAPTIVE HEADLIGHTS Millennials loved the idea of adaptive headlights both for safety reasons whilst driving in the dark and on country roads, but also for the added convenience the technology offers drivers. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 ADAPTIVE CRUISE CONTROL LANE DEPARTURE PREVENTION FATIGUE DETECTION FORWARD COLLISION AVOIDANCE PARKING ASSIST ADAPTIVE HEADLIGHTS BLIND SPOT DETECTOR Figure 10: Which of these safety features would have the biggest positive impact on driving for you? If you don’t drive, think about what would make you feel safest as a passenger, or a driver in the future. Source: Hark UK Millennials Panel by Different Spin, 2015. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 37
  38. 38. Millennials soon: semi-autonomous technology PARKING WOES “As long as I could ignore it because on the way home from work if I was knackered and my car just said ‘sorry I’m not letting you drive’ I would be angry. Emma, 22 THE ONE THAT GOES BEEP Parking is an issue frequently mentioned by Millennials. Both in the ease (or not) of parallel parking, finding and paying for a spot in the city, and the desire to drive a smaller car to make parking easier. Overall, participants listed parking assistance technology in their top three, but it should be noted that most Millennials prioritised technology that could save lives over technology to help them park better. Even the ones who admitted how bad they are at parking. COULD GET ANNOYING Whilst the majority of Millennials recognise the value semi- autonomous tech could bring to improve safety, some were sceptical of its effectiveness and others thought it would just piss them off. There was also a concern that technology like lane departure prevention could create a culture of lazy drivers. “Because I was never great at parking when I was trying to learn to drive and this would make me feel more relaxed while parking.” Daniel, 22 “The only time I've ever crashed a car was when I was parking!” Jackson, 25 “Yeah blind spot detection is a good idea. The only thing I can think of is that it might detect things like trees and you'd be like 'ah I'm going to die' but it's actually just a tree.” Rebecca, 22 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 38
  39. 39. Section four Millennials in the future The need for disruption Driverless vehicles Brands leading the automotive industry Visualising the future of mobility #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 39
  40. 40. Millennials in the future: need for disruption OUT WITH THE OLD ADMITTING YOU HAVE A PROBLEM Throughout the research, we found that Millennials recognised the need for change and disruption in the auto industry. SO LAST CENTURY Millennials hold a belief that traditional and long standing brands will have to innovate and disrupt themselves in order to survive in a market that is changing rapidly. GOOD OLD BRITISH CYNICISM Despite acknowledging the need for disruption in automotive, many Millennials also exhibited a distinct pessimism about when these changes would materialise. “We have the technology, it just needs to be invested in and honed and made more appealing by the motor industry.” Jody, 34 “To be honest, I don’t really see there being that much of a change in the next 10 years. A car will still look like a car and the predominant mode of transport.” Andie, 28 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 40
  41. 41. “In ten years I believe our traditional means of transport will not be used anymore.” Melanie, 23 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 41
  42. 42. Millennials in the future: driverless vehicles AUTONOMOUS FUTURES IMAGINING 2025 Generally, Millennials find it difficult to imagine driverless cars on the road and used by normal people for at least 10 years. But when they do allow themselves to think that far ahead, the more open minded Millennials can picture a realistic future of mobility involving driverless cars. Although a minority are sceptical and don’t think much will change in automotive by 2025, those who do have an opinion fall into one of four camps: 1.  Bring it on 2.  Open but cautious 3.  Where’s the fun in that? 4.  Major safety concerns Figure 11: What do you feel about a future where cars and other vehicles are autonomous e.g. self-driving/driverless cars? Source: Reevoo Research Panel commissioned by Different Spin, 2015. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 42
  43. 43. Millennials in the future: driverless vehicles POSITIVE ABOUT DRIVERLESS “I am excited to think I could use two hours a day for something more productive.” Chris, 19-34 “I think it would be scary but only in so far as I'm a human and I like to have control but knowing the research that has gone into it and everything. I know, like rationally, that they're safer than actually driving a car. Plus I don't use myself to drive so yeah.” Rebecca, 22 1. BRING IT ON They are excited by a future of driverless cars, especially an on-demand shared network of autonomous vehicles. They are already planning what to do with the extra time not having to drive will grant them, or the extra privacy they’ll get over public transport. In fact we saw some rather creative *cough cough* suggestions for how they would use their time inside a driverless car. Millennials who obviously had more wholesome topics on their minds expressed their confidence in increased safety levels and therefore fewer accidents on the roads. 2. OPEN BUT CAUTIOUS This group were excited by the possibilities of driverless cars but unsure of how quickly they could become a reality. 10 years doesn’t seem enough time for stringent safety tests and tech crime prevention measures. Age ranges given where quotes from Reevoo panellists have been used. “Driverless cars will help with accident prevention and damage limitation.” Luke, 19-34 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 43
  44. 44. Millennials in the future: driverless vehicles NEGATIVE ABOUT DRIVERLESS “I think it would completely freak me out but maybe in like 30 years time if they were everywhere, possibly.” Naomi, 24 “No, that would creep me out. I'd be panicking. It's bad enough if someone else is driving.” Laura, 24 3. MAJOR SAFETY CONCERNS When asked about a driverless future the first word that springs to mind for this group is ‘scary’. They don’t trust technology, and fear that relying on it for transportation will put lives in danger. They have major concerns about the reliability of driverless vehicles and would not consider travelling in one unless they could switch it over to manual within seconds. 4. WHERE’S THE FUN IN THAT? This group is in the slight minority, although all four groups are fairly evenly spread. These Millennials do believe that driverless vehicles will eventually be used, but it’s definitely not something they would go in for. They love the act of driving too much, they enjoy the freedom to drive and the control it gives them, and would hate the feeling of handing over the reins to anyone else, let alone a machine. They don’t like being passengers. “A dangerous idea.” Julie, 19-34 “Loss of freedom to drive where and when you want” Colin, 19-34 Age ranges given where quotes from Reevoo panellists have been used. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 44
  45. 45. Millennials in the future: brands leading automotive NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK RISE OF THE MACHINES Our Millennials saw a future for tech companies in the automotive industry, as top brands like Google and Apple have voiced plans to move into this sector. However, some Millennials do doubt their commitment to these ventures or the quality of their eventual output. IN THE LAP OF LUXURY Despite exhibiting little or no intention to become customers, Millennials also predicted that luxury automotive brands would continue to hold a prominent position in the auto industry due to a loyal customer base and consistent quality. SHARED FUTURES Millennials believe that brands like Uber and Zipcar have a larger future in automotive as their services become more popular and people move from ownership to sharing models. “Peak oil has probably happened already and Tesla will be ahead of the game.” Nicholas, 33 “Elon Musk is a genius.” Andie, 28 “With what they're doing now, I can't see them falling behind. Rather, I think they'll be using their profits to produces lower price range cars for the masses and get a bigger market share.” Clarence, 33 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 45
  46. 46. Millennials in the future: brands leading automotive INNOVATION IS KING LEADING THE WAY When we asked Millennials which brands they thought would be leading the automotive industry in 10 years’ time, the brands that stood out were: Uber, Tesla, Google, BMW, Apple and Toyota. INNOVATION = SUCCESS In the same task, we asked Millennials to pin the companies they considered to be the most innovative. The results were almost exactly the same. It is clear that a perception of innovation for Millennials equals long-term success. ELECTRIC IS THE FUTURE Millennials believe that the brands that can crack EV have the most potential for long-term success. Tesla featured highly on the list, and Millennials are looking forward to a time when Tesla electric vehicles become mainstream in the UK; they believe that Tesla are the brand to lead the way to an EV future. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 46 Figure 12: Which of these brands do you think will be leading the automotive industry in 10 years’ time? Source: Hark UK Millennials Panel by Different Spin, 2015.
  47. 47. “Most journeys are taken by an individual, making cars a wasteful use of space and resources - I'd like to see an approach that tackles this. Perhaps a hybrid of on-demand single person driverless vehicles and improved automated rapid mass transport.” Khal, 34 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 47
  48. 48. Millennials in the future: visualising the future of mobility THE FUTURE OF MOBILITY “The rise of electric cars is pretty much given but there are still concerns. These concerns tend to revolve around the mileage obtainable, the time it takes to charge and the availability of charging stations. Of these I think a break through in terms of an affordable super fast charging battery would make the most difference.” Natalie, 22 “A car to hire delivered to your door for ultimate convenience.” Ed, 32 THE NEXT BIG THING We asked Millennials to paint the picture of what they thought transportation would look like in 2025. The responses we got were at opposite ends of the spectrum – half of Millennials played it safe and did not think that much would change in 10 years other than more environmentally friendly fuel sources and in-car technology developments. The other half let their imaginations run wild and visualised an alternative future of flying cars, hover boards and automated rapid mass transport. Here are some of the developments Millennials expect to see over the next 10 years. EV INNOVATIONS Most Millennials believe that the future of automotive is electric. But they aren’t confident that the current technology is good enough for the mass market. They want to see improvements to the infrastructure; more charging points in more convenient places, and batteries that have longer life and take less time to charge. ALTERNATIVE FUEL SOURCES It’s granted that current fuel sources will eventually need to be replaced with a more sustainable alternative. Millennials proposed alternatives ranging from bio fuel to solar powered, and even electromagnetic force. CAR SHARING DEVELOPMENTS Millennials would like to see the rollout of car sharing services across the UK, including rural areas, and with more availability and more choice. They would like to be able to have their car delivered to them and be able to easily book it via an Uber-style phone app. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 48
  49. 49. “I think the driverless car has a real chance of being available in 10 years, and it may well be my main mode of transport. If I don't have to drive, and I don't have to share a space with others, I'd look forward to utilising that new found me time.” Clarence, 33 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 49
  50. 50. Millennials in the future: visualising the future of mobility CHANGING CAR CONSUMERS #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 50 Figure 13: Millennial participants were asked to place themselves on the above image using Hark’s pinning tool based on the type of car consumer they are now and the type of consumer they think they will be in 2025. The image on the left shows where panellists placed themselves now. The image on the right shows where they thought they would be in 10 years. Source: Hark UK Millennials Panel by Different Spin, 2015. inspired by Adam Jonas, Morgan Stanley auto analyst.
  51. 51. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 51 Clarence (33) visualises four types of driverless car that allow him to use his extra non-driving time productively.
  52. 52. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 52 Laura (31) visualises a driverless future where car parks aren’t needed and have been turned into urban allotments.
  53. 53. “Realistically the current generation doesn't need to drive but essentially if that keeps happening no one's going to pick up the slack and no one will drive and we'll go back to horse and cart.” Hannah, 22 #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 53
  54. 54. So what does this mean for automotive?
  55. 55. So what next? Over the next four weeks we will be releasing two further reports and webinars exploring what this research means for those currently working in the automotive industry. What should you be doing now to prepare for the future? Product and marketing innovation, Monday 30 November (plus webinar 2pm GMT) Car buying, retail and aftersales innovation ,Monday 14 December (plus webinar 2pm GMT) #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 55 SUBSCRIBE AT differentspin.com/subscribe
  56. 56. Product innovation: saving money, saving lives and disrupting an entire industry INSURE THE BOX Insure The Box was created by insurance stalwart Michael Brockman to solve a problem being faced by the insurance industry. At a time when insurance premiums regularly hit the £4,000 mark for newly qualified young drivers, Michael and his team set out to reduce these cost prohibitive premiums whilst making the roads safer for young people and saving lives. Telematics represented that solution, a black box installed into your car that is connected via the mobile network to an online portal tracking your driving behaviour. The portal suggests ways to drive more safely and actively rewards safer driving with lower premiums. The behavioural change benefits of the online portal are proven to deliver an average 35% reduction in risk in the first 11 months of driving with a black box. In addition, Insure The Box has an auto alert system in place that has been finely tuned over the last five years so that the black box can detect the severity of a collision and where appropriate, activate emergency services. Insure The Box deploys the emergency services around 20 times a month to crash sites. Insure The Box represents everything the automotive and mobility market needs to get right to engage Millennials. Solving a real problem using technology, establishing a highly personalised relationship with the customer, underpinned by an authentic and meaningful mission to save money and save lives. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 56
  57. 57. Marketing innovation: a platform at the heart of the digital storytelling revolution STORYSTREAM & PORSCHE StoryStream is an intelligent content marketing platform. It helps brands dynamically source and distribute engaging content to wherever their customers make purchase decisions. By combining user generated, branded and editorial content, automotive brands can deliver highly relevant and personalised experiences across websites, in-dealer and any other digital screen. The result is a more authentic, connected customer experience helping to drive car purchase consideration. Porsche have been working with StoryStream globally to help bring the brand to life through real-time digital content.  It has helped them address one of their key content marketing challenges; enabling rapid and controlled content distribution across every Porsche customer channel including global, market and dealer. Using the StoryStream enterprise technology, Porsche power their global websites, live product launches, campaigns, internal communications and dealer screens with a unique mix of live content. This approach ensures every customer experiences a consistent, localised and highly engaging Porsche story at all points of their buying journey. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 57
  58. 58. Car buying innovation: harnessing advocacy and instilling trust with customer reviews REEVOO & LEXUS Reevoo has pioneered a new and improved approach to ratings and reviews based on independent validation. They provide consumers with peer reviews directly from the website of the manufacturer, instilling trust and giving potential customers the information they need to convert. They have worked with a number of major OEMs across the automotive industry to help them harness the voice of their customers across the multichannel purchase journey. One of the clients benefitting from this unique approach is Lexus. Whilst awareness of the Lexus brand is high among consumers, the company felt that it could do more to feature on the consideration list for UK buyers. The solution, using Reevoo, was to use existing owners as a voice for the brand, capturing their enthusiasm and using it to influence people considering a Lexus. Lexus enlisted Reevoo to begin collecting car reviews from verified Lexus owners. Reevoo’s Ask-an-owner feature was also part of the implementation, allowing potential Lexus customers to quiz existing owners. The Lexus range received an average score of 9 out of 10 across all vehicles. Reevoo’s SEO Boost feature embedded the review content on individual product webpages, enriching Lexus’ website with natural language perfect for search engines. The level of detail Reevoo is able to collect in the reviews has also provide Lexus with valuable customer insight which is now used regularly in the development process. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 58
  59. 59. Retail innovation: revolutionising the experience of buying a car both online and in store ROCKAR Simon Dixon spent 20 years building the UK’s third largest car retail group, Dixon Motors PLC. Over time, he saw the frustrations that his customers experienced with the car buying process and, upon selling his company to RBS, set out to challenge the car buying process in every way possible. Together with a team of like minded individuals, they created Rockar, a new way to buy cars designed from the customer’s point of view. In the way that Apple revolutionised the technology retail space, Rockar’s aim was to revolutionise the way cars are bought today. Rockar empowers the customer to take charge at every step of the buying process. Rockar’s unique website allows the user to search from a full selection of Hyundai models, sell their old car, choose a finance option to suit their needs, build their new car including custom features and design and once purchase is complete, to track delivery every step of the way – all of this without speaking to a single salesperson. The next challenge was accessibility, bringing the Rockar ethos in store to major shopping centres across the UK with a unique retail design that allows customers to browse as they wish aided by engaging digital content to explain the journey ahead. In store are the Rockar Angels, whose mission is not to sell but rather to inform and help customers book test drives and arrange services. Rockar is a company built with the purpose of continuously challenging and improving themselves to match the needs of customers present and future. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 59
  60. 60. Methodology DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this research we focus on Millennials aged 19-34 years-old in the UK. Some charts in this report include different age groupings, where the data is from external sources e.g. National Travel Survey and we have been unable to obtain data in different formats. All charts are clearly labelled and sourced. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY We used a combination of quantitative and qualitative research approaches to create this report with a total sample size of 33,521. 1.  Audience profiling through GlobalWebIndex survey data from a representative sample of UK internet users. 2.  Deep dive research panel of UK Millennials 3.  Reevoo Car Buyers Panel survey 4.  Analysis of publically available data on driving trends in the UK Further detail on methodology is provided at the end of the report. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 60
  61. 61. Further details on the research methodology used to create this report METHODOLOGY MILLENNIALS 19-34 year olds in the UK. AUDIENCE PROFILING •  Profiling 19-34 year old UK internet users against other generations •  GlobalWebIndex survey data, collected in waves/quarters since 2009 •  Latest data from Q3 2015 •  Based on a representative sample of internet users •  Sample size 32,851 Millennials HARK MILLENNIALS PANEL •  Deep dive qualitative research via an invite-only online focus group platform •  Platform developed and managed by Different Spin and Bloom Worldwide •  Supplemented with Skype video interviews with some participants •  Panel members were asked to complete a series of tasks including online image pinning, drawing, idea submissions and question and answer •  Tasks listed on next page •  All questions were open-ended •  Sample size 43 UK Millennials REEVOO CAR BUYERS PANEL •  Survey submitted to over 15,000 Reevoo users who have opted to take part in research •  Closed and open-ended questions •  Sample size 627 PUBLICALLY AVAILABLE DATA •  Analysis of official statistics from UK Government Department for Transport •  National Travel Survey •  Data collection consists of a face-to-face interview and a 7 day self-completed travel diary •  Covers all age groups including children •  In 2013 the survey coverage changed from sampling Great Britain residents to England residents only •  16,000 individuals from 7,000 households participate each year #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 61
  62. 62. Further details on the research methodology used to create this report HARK MILLENNIALS PANEL TASKS TASK 1: WHO’S LEADING THE AUTO INDUSTRY? Which of these brands have you used for your transportation needs recently (in the past month)? Which of these brands do you expect to use or own in the next 5 years? Which of these brands do you consider to be the most innovative? Which of these brands do you think will be leading the automotive industry in 10 years’ time? Which of these brands do you think is least likely to be around in 10 years’ time? TASK 2: HOW DO YOU TRAVEL? Which modes of transportation do you use on a day-to-day basis? Show us how you get around whether it's travelling to work, school or to see friends. Upload a photo for each kind of transportation you use and tell us in the caption what you use it for and how often. TASK 3: WHAT WOULD YOU BUY? If you were considering buying a car now (assume you can drive), what aspects would be most important to you? Here are some areas that might influence your purchase decision: cost, appearance, practicality, speed, size, safety, energy efficiency, fuel efficiency, technology, colour. Consider which of these mean the most to you at this point in time and why that might be. You can use whichever format you prefer to answer this question including images, video, audio recording and text. We encourage you to be creative and provide a full and descriptive answer. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 62
  63. 63. Further details on the research methodology used to create this report HARK MILLENNIALS PANEL TASKS TASK 4: WHICH INNOVATIVE SAFETY FEATURES MATTER? Which of these safety features would have the biggest positive impact on driving for you? If you don't drive, think about what would make you feel safest as a passenger, or a driver in the future. You can pin up to 3 of the semi-autonomous safety features shown on the image. We ask you to please add a comment to explain your answer. TASK 5: HOW WILL YOU TRAVEL IN THE FUTURE? Think about how we will be travelling around in 10 years' time. What will have changed? In a drawing of your own creation, show us what you think your main form of transportation will look like in 10 years' time. It's up to you how you create your drawing whether it's with pen and paper, crayon, oil painting, photo collage, Photoshop, Microsoft Paint or an online drawing tool like Sketch. Be as creative as you like - we have a spot prize available for the most creative response! But don't worry - we won't judge you on your artistic skills :) TASK 6: WHAT’S THE NEXT BIG THING? What do you think will be the most important innovation in the automotive industry in the next 10 years? It might already exist, it might not. What will change the way we get around in 2025? Submit as many ideas as you want to, with the option of adding images or video to bring your idea to life. Once you have submitted your idea, other users can vote your ideas up or down or contribute to them by adding comments. Please take the time to vote on and add comments to other users' entries as well. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 63
  64. 64. Further details on the research methodology used to create this report HARK MILLENNIALS PANEL TASKS TASK 7: WHO ARE YOU? This diagram shows 4 different kinds of car consumers, ranging from car owners to shared car consumers and from human car drivers to fully driverless autonomous car users. Please place yourself on the diagram, on the scale that best represents you NOW. (Remember you can place yourself anywhere on this scale, across the vertical and horizontal ranges to best represent you). Please place yourself on the diagram, on the scale that best represents you IN 5 YEARS’ TIME. Please place yourself on the diagram, on the scale that best represents you IN 10 YEARS’ TIME. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 64
  65. 65. With thanks Contributors John Tews, JD Power Professor Noreen McDonald, University of North Carolina and Institute of Transport Studies at the University of Leeds Paul Syron, Statistics Travel and Safety (STS), Department for Transport Kelly Edwards, Bus and Local Transport Statistics, Department for Transport Judy Nokes, The National Archives Paul Bloomfield, Office for National Statistics Giles Horsfield, Office for National Statistics Gemma Flynn, City Car Club Anna Fireman, Mintel Alex Vaidya, StoryStream Geoff Turrell, StoryStream Lexy Hall, StoryStream Marina Cheal, Reevoo Edwin Bos, Reevoo Hannah Murray-Sykes, Reevoo Daniel Thorpe, Reevoo David Janner-Klausner, Commonplace Patrick Morrison, Patrick Morrison Ltd. John Davison, Studio Syrup Hark panellists Andie C. Oliver G. Hata S. Clarence L. Emily N. Alejandro GF. Tanya K. Jackson R. Zoe R. Natalie L. Melanie S. Agata B. Ayako F. Melissa H. Sonia G. Inara M. Rebecca S. Carrie T. Allison M. Daniel S. Maria K. Melanie R. Ed G. George F. Melody M. Robin C. Ros P. Nicholas H. Jody E. Ed R. Amy J. Nicole H. Sam Z. Rebecca B. Khal W. Rachael P. Naomi B. Laura P. Kelly R. Hannah HH. Emma P. Jessica B. Rebekah C. Different Spin / Bloom Laura Dinneen Kate Cooper Natasha Morrison Mary-Ann Johnn Dan Feane Paul Gunn #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 65
  66. 66. Coming February 2016 Automotive fails women There is a gap between the automotive industry’s comprehension of women and the reality. Women don't show their true experiences in traditional focus groups and via commonplace research methods. As a result, marketers and product developers are failing to deliver products,  communications and experiences that truly resonate with women.  And this is effecting the bottom line. In this ground-breaking research project, we get under the skin of the passion and pain points of four different groups of female consumer: 1.          Mums 2.          Millennials 3.          Empty nesters 4.          Professionals Insight gathered from this extensive research project will be used by the automotive sector to truly engage with woman in a meaningful way and develop innovative products and solutions that solve their problems and meet their needs. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 66 SUBSCRIBE AT differentspin.com/subscribe
  67. 67. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT •  Market entry and demand studies •  Product innovation •  Product testing •  Crowdsourcing product ideas •  Trend analysis CONSUMER INTELLIGENCE •  Target market analysis •  Audience profiling •  Conversation analysis (social media) COMPETITOR INTELLIGENCE •  Industry analysis •  Competitor benchmarking •  Gap analysis MARKETING INTELLIGENCE •  Campaign development •  Creative testing •  Campaign performance & measurement •  Attribution modelling Do you really understand your audience? Bloom provides in depth and human research using Hark, our global insights community. Made up of over 5,000 active participants who can be segmented demographically or psychographically. #DifferentSpin | Dude, where’s my car? | 67
  68. 68. Dude, where’s my car? The “complicated” relationship between the automotive industry and Millennials Different Spin and Bloom Worldwide 2015 different-spin.com bloomworldwide.com This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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