Presented by Mrs. S. Dianne Black
Types of                      Poems Haiku—Japanese fixed-form poem     structured in 3 lines of 17 syllable;     captures...
…types of poems • Sonnet—14 lines of iambic pentameter;     can be Shakespearean/English (3     quatrains followed by a co...
…continued• Ballad—short poem in song format that  tells a story• Elegy—subject is death of aperson• Epic—long, adventurou...
...continued• Narrative—the poet tells a story with   characters and a plot• Ode—originally a Greek form, odes are   serio...
ThemePurpose of the poemWhat the poet needed to sayExpresses the unity of human    experienceSee that we are more alik...
Imagery• Sight• Hearing• Touch• Smell• TasteEffects: transports us to another place,  time, and experience; allows us to  ...
DictionHow does a poet choose the exact word?• Sound: how does the word sound? Does  it contribute to the meaning, to the ...
Sound• Rhyme                     •   Alliteration• Exact Rhyme               •   Assonance• Slant Rhyme/Approximate   •   ...
…sound continuedDefinitions and Examples:Rhyme: words that sound either exactly alike or merely similarExact Rhyme:Cat, h...
…sound continuedSlant rhyme/approximate rhyme:The words sound close but are not exact  rhymesMirror, steer, dear or book...
…sound continuedAssonance:Repetition of vowel sounds; some words using assonance will rhyme exactly; others will simply m...
…sound continuedInternal rhyme vs. end rhyme: end rhyme occurs only at the end of the  line whereas internal rhyme happen...
…sound continuedAlliterationRepetition of beginning sounds in close proximity“Susan sent sally some sunflowers,” or “Loo...
…sound continuedCacophonyHarsh , discordant, or unpleasing sounds2/9/2013                                    15
…sound continued             CONSONANCERepetition of consonant soundsExact rhymes use consonance— foot, put, sootBut al...
…sound continuedEuphonyPleasing, melodious, pleasant sounds2/9/2013                                17
…sound continuedMeter:A rhythm accomplished by using a certain number of beats or syllables per lineIambic is the most c...
Final Points about SoundSound is not as important as the idea or meaning of the poem.Sound simply extends the meaning of...
Figurative Language• Metaphors: comparison of 2 dissimilar  things to help us se something in a new or  more meaningful wa...
…figurative lang. continued• Personification: comparison by giving  something non-human, human characteristics• Oxymoron: ...
Helpful Terms•   Apostrophe             •   Quatrain•   Couplet                •   Sestet•   Epigram                •   Sp...
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Poetry ppt

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Poetry elements

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Poetry ppt

  1. 1. Presented by Mrs. S. Dianne Black
  2. 2. Types of Poems Haiku—Japanese fixed-form poem structured in 3 lines of 17 syllable; captures a moment in time or aspect of nature  Sestina—French form of six six-line stanzas followed by a tercet called an envoy to =39 lines; set of six words is repeated in varying patterns at the ends of the lines of each of the six-line stanzas; the six words also in the envoy, two in each line of the tercet2/9/2013 2
  3. 3. …types of poems • Sonnet—14 lines of iambic pentameter; can be Shakespearean/English (3 quatrains followed by a couplet) or Petrarchan/Italian (octave followed by 2 tercets) • Villanelle—fixed-form of 19 lines composed of 5 tercets (rhyme scheme:aba) and a concluding quatrain (rhyme scheme:abaa); lines one & three of the 1st tercet serve as refrains2/9/2013 3
  4. 4. …continued• Ballad—short poem in song format that tells a story• Elegy—subject is death of aperson• Epic—long, adventurous tale with a hero• Lyric—expresses love, inner emotions tends to be personal; usually written in 1st person2/9/2013 4
  5. 5. ...continued• Narrative—the poet tells a story with characters and a plot• Ode—originally a Greek form, odes are serious lyric poems; English Romantic poets reinvigorated the form• Prose poem—looks like a paragraph, even having a jagged right margin; may read like a paragraph, but retains poetic elements such as imagery, figurative language, and concise 2/9/2013 5 language.
  6. 6. ThemePurpose of the poemWhat the poet needed to sayExpresses the unity of human experienceSee that we are more alike as a human race than differentTells us what is true about usExpresses the poet’s vision about the truth of the world2/9/2013 6
  7. 7. Imagery• Sight• Hearing• Touch• Smell• TasteEffects: transports us to another place, time, and experience; allows us to understand the emotions in the poem; creates tone; allows poet to show us meaning by taking us into the environment of the poem2/9/2013 7
  8. 8. DictionHow does a poet choose the exact word?• Sound: how does the word sound? Does it contribute to the meaning, to the overall sound scheme, or does it interrupt or interfere?• Denotation: What is the exact meaning of the word?• Connotation: What is the suggested meaning? What is the emotive quality? Every word matters . Never skim over any word in a poem.2/9/2013 8
  9. 9. Sound• Rhyme • Alliteration• Exact Rhyme • Assonance• Slant Rhyme/Approximate • Cacophony Rhyme • Euphony• Internal Rhyme vs. End • Meter Rhyme2/9/2013 9
  10. 10. …sound continuedDefinitions and Examples:Rhyme: words that sound either exactly alike or merely similarExact Rhyme:Cat, hat, flat, mat: masculine rhyme (one syllable rhymesFalling, calling, stalling: feminine rhyme (two or more syllables)2/9/2013 10
  11. 11. …sound continuedSlant rhyme/approximate rhyme:The words sound close but are not exact rhymesMirror, steer, dear or book, crack, stick (consonance is used most often for slant rhymes)2/9/2013 11
  12. 12. …sound continuedAssonance:Repetition of vowel sounds; some words using assonance will rhyme exactly; others will simply mirror the vowel soundsCake, stake, break, fate, drank, ache, plac ate, etc.2/9/2013 12
  13. 13. …sound continuedInternal rhyme vs. end rhyme: end rhyme occurs only at the end of the line whereas internal rhyme happens within the lines2/9/2013 13
  14. 14. …sound continuedAlliterationRepetition of beginning sounds in close proximity“Susan sent sally some sunflowers,” or “Loons lurk late in autumn lakes under lavender skies.2/9/2013 14
  15. 15. …sound continuedCacophonyHarsh , discordant, or unpleasing sounds2/9/2013 15
  16. 16. …sound continued CONSONANCERepetition of consonant soundsExact rhymes use consonance— foot, put, sootBut all words that repeat sounds are using consonance—add, suit, unfitCan occur in the middle of words— river, liver, cadaver, waver, save rave2/9/2013 16
  17. 17. …sound continuedEuphonyPleasing, melodious, pleasant sounds2/9/2013 17
  18. 18. …sound continuedMeter:A rhythm accomplished by using a certain number of beats or syllables per lineIambic is the most common meter (a foot consisting of one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable (U /)A foot is simply 2 syllables or in some cases 3Iambic Pentameter means a 5-foot iambic line, or 10 syllables 2/9/2013 18
  19. 19. Final Points about SoundSound is not as important as the idea or meaning of the poem.Sound simply extends the meaning of the poem and enhances ideas.Sound not likely to be a significant factor in meaning in older fixed form poems.Sound in free verse poems are more experimental2/9/2013 19
  20. 20. Figurative Language• Metaphors: comparison of 2 dissimilar things to help us se something in a new or more meaningful way• Direct metaphor: comparison using the word “is.” “Life is a river.”• Indirect metaphor: “The river of life” all compares life to a river but does so indirectly2/9/2013 20
  21. 21. …figurative lang. continued• Personification: comparison by giving something non-human, human characteristics• Oxymoron: juxtaposing 2 things apparently contradictory that till reinforce one idea—jumbo shrimp, only choice, virtual reality• Hyperbole: using exaggeration to extend reality; gets us to look more closely at what is actually true by giving us a sharp contrast.• Understatement: opposite of hyperbole; used to say less than is appropriate for the situation or for meaning2/9/2013 21
  22. 22. Helpful Terms• Apostrophe • Quatrain• Couplet • Sestet• Epigram • Speaker• Fixed form • Stanza• Metonymy • Structure• Metaphysical conceit • Synecdoche• Mood • Tercet• Octave • Tone• Pun • Unity2/9/2013 22

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