Developing an online presence

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Developing an online presence

  1. 1. Developing an Online Presence October 19, 2012 Diane Onorato Claudia Matz Cartoon Source http://kbarnstable.wordpress.com /
  2. 2. Agenda: (Please pick up handouts and complete survey) Annual Conference on Distance Teaching and Learning Madison, WI August 8-10, 2012 Community of Inquiry Creating Presence Facilitating Presence Six-Step Change Cycle Activity Wrap-up Next online Presence or presence Online
  3. 3. Presence with a lower case letter: A presence online Are you ready to take your class beyond Face2Face to the next level? Are you ready to begin to establish a presence online?
  4. 4. Presence with a Capital Letter: An online Presence = P A class with resence immerses learners in an illusion that becomes its own reality: The students are so actively and richly engaged that they forget that they are online. Lehman, Rosemary and Simone C.O. Conceicao. (2010). Creating a Sense of Presence in Online Teaching. pp. 18-
  5. 5. Develop a Community of Inquiry Social Presence: Establishes learners as individuals and helps build interpersonal relationships that have a positive effect on learning. Online experience should allow for collaboration, negotiation, and creation. Cognitive Presence: ability to construct knowledge together as students engage in sustained interactions. Online experience should be sustained and reflective: critical thinking, problem-solving activities, debate. Stavredes, Tina. (2011). Effective online teaching: Foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Wiley.
  6. 6. Community of Inquiry: Teaching Presence Teaching presence is important for the creation and sustainability of a community of inquiry focused on exploration, integration, and testing of concepts and solutions. The instructor’s creation of a supportive teaching presence is a critical element for successful interaction not only between the instructor and learners but also among the learners themselves. Rita-Marie Conrad and J. Ana Donaldson. Continuing to Engage the Online Learner. (2012). See pages 11-12.
  7. 7. All Online Presence Begins With Course Design 1.Preplanning: instructional materials and assignments are ready, available, and fully functioning when the course starts 2.Anticipating: prepare and articulate all student responsibilities and deliverables 3.Prioritize activities and evaluations in the course; develop the calendar and the rubrics 4.Predict your learners’ needs; establish guidelines 5.Provide and explain the support systems:  external from Blackboard  within Mercyhurst University  from instructor (set up communication expectations: how, when, best contact methods)  peer to peer (informal discussion board, Facebook page, Twitter, peer review assignments, partners) Lehman, Rosemary and Simone C.O. Conceicao. (2010). Creating a Sense of Presence in Online Teaching.
  8. 8. Kathleen Sheridan. “Teacher dispositions in the online classroom.” Pilot study, 60 students. Distance Teaching and Learning, Madison, WI (2012). Establishing Teacher Presence: Top 10 Behaviors According to Students Communicate: From the Very Beginning 1. Write a welcome note to students: balance professional expertise with some appropriate personal comments so students can relate to instructor. 2. Personalize feedback with student names and specific references. Mention what you notice: comment, appreciate, praise. 3. Write a personal note to students at least once. 4. Keep response time within 24-48 hrs. and write careful responses for at least 3 times in the beginning of the course. 5. Open class for students to explore before the course begins. 6. Let students start to talk to each other before the class starts so they are ready to go when the class starts. Open discussion forums early.
  9. 9. Communication =Explain Expectations Top 10 Behaviors According to Students       due dates and time frame expectations for discussions course requirements, outcomes processes, instructions use template/clearly organized navigation tone matters Kathleen Sheridan. “Teacher dispositions in the online classroom.” Pilot study, 60 students. Distance Teaching and Learning, Madison, WI (2012). Establishing Teacher Presence: Top 10 Behaviors According to
  10. 10. Communication = Provide Feedback Top 10 Behaviors According to Students Provide  clear instructions about how to participate  interesting material  grading rubrics  timely feedback  updated calendar  Don’t assign discussions if you don’t participate – Kathleen Sheridan, Associate Provost Academic Programs and Faculty Development, National Louis University. “Teacher dispositions in the online classroom.” Pilot study, 60 students. Distance Teaching and Learning, Madison, WI (2012).
  11. 11. Teaching Presence: Discussion Facilitator Sharing too much of your own opinion and perspective is negative to development of critical thinking. Instead, try the following: No response after a few days?? add a prompt or give an example of a response that includes necessary elements of a discussion response (the response could be about a different topic so as to not sway student thinking, but have all the aspects of an acceptable post) •Too vague?? Ask for elaboration/clarification with specific references to what to expand. •Busy discussion board?? Try weaving. Weaving points out main points of several learners OR pulls a disorganized or off-track conversation back to point. This is a good way to demonstrate presence without targeting particular students and avoiding singling one. Enter discussion several times to weave and connect responses together. Stavredes, Tina. (2011). Effective online teaching: Foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Wiley .
  12. 12. Teaching Presence: Discussion Facilitator Need to direct an off-track conversation?? provide an actual or real-world experience narrative illustrating what others are saying or one that is on-track. Conversation dragging or sounding like crickets?? enter the discussion and plant a counterpoint for consideration OR request others to think of opposite positions which may not be their own perspective but which may counter-argue those views which are posted. Conversation not moving into higher levels of cognition?? Enter the discussion and ask students to think of implications of their reason or extensions OR to make related evaluations or judgments. At the end of a discussion, provide a summary of the conversation. Stavredes, Tina. (2011). Effective online teaching: Foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Wiley.
  13. 13. Obstacles to Overcome in Establishing Presence       The way we think: traditional v. ?? Lack of understanding of what online learning is Tendency to be consumed by online demands Balancing student needs with personal boundaries Funding or support Technical malfunctions Source of cartoon is http://learnmore.uncg.edu/blog/bid/97532/Teaching-Online-Is-All-About-Communication Lehman, Rosemary and Simone C.O. Conceicao. (2010). Creating a Sense of Presence in Online Teaching.
  14. 14. Advantages of Establishing Presence     Students feel like their needs are being met and that other learners are accessible too. Positive reviews of instructor and school Retention LEARNING Lehman, Rosemary and Simone C.O. Conceicao. (2010). Creating a Sense of Presence in Online Teaching.
  15. 15. Stage A  State of non-readiness and non-use  Resistant and have little or no knowledge  Denial of benefit personally or instructionally  Technology is another passing educational fad  May cite lack of access or time as reasons Hixon E. and Buckenmeyer, J. (2009). Revisiting technology integration in schools: Implications for professional development. Computers in the Schools 26(2), 130-146. doi: 10.1080/07380560902906070
  16. 16. Stage B  Focus on technology itself or technology for personal use  Proficient with specific software programs  May be easily impressed with basic functionalities that others expect  Due to limited knowledge and confidence, often experience technology-related problems that they are unable to solve. Hixon E. and Buckenmeyer, J. (2009). Revisiting technology integration in schools: Implications for professional development. Computers in the Schools 26(2), 130-146. doi: 10.1080/07380560902906070
  17. 17. Stage C  Have basic understanding of some, not all, technologies and often use the appropriate jargon with students and colleagues  View technology as end rather than means  Upon encountering difficulties, discontinue use and return to traditional instruction  Believe technology is non-essential and is only supplemental Hixon E. and Buckenmeyer, J. (2009). Revisiting technology integration in schools: Implications for professional development. Computers in the Schools 26(2), 130-146. doi: 10.1080/07380560902906070
  18. 18. Stage D  View as an instructional tool rather than an instructional component  Consider technology an integral part of the instructional process that cannot easily be abandoned  Still experimenting with how best to use technology  Provide a great deal of structure for students in the learning process  Willing to solve minor technological malfunctions Hixon E. and Buckenmeyer, J. (2009). Revisiting technology integration in schools: Implications for professional development. Computers in the Schools 26(2), 130-146. doi: 10.1080/07380560902906070
  19. 19. Stage E  Find it necessary to redefine teaching and learning after realizing the educational value  Tend to use more varied instructional strategies and require higher order thinking  Require students to use various technology applications daily or weekly  Typically request little assistance from tech support Hixon E. and Buckenmeyer, J. (2009). Revisiting technology integration in schools: Implications for professional development. Computers in the Schools 26(2), 130146. doi: 10.1080/07380560902906070
  20. 20. Stage F  View technology as a force that has significantly changed their teaching  Engaged in active discussions related to research using, planning for, and management of instructional technology  Students in these classrooms take active role in the use of technology to direct their own learning activities Hixon E. and Buckenmeyer, J. (2009). Revisiting technology integration in schools: Implications for professional development. Computers in the Schools 26(2), 130-146. doi: 10.1080/07380560902906070
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