SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 132
Download to read offline
Ministry of Commerce & Industries, Govt. of India
Fashion Illustration-II
School of Fashion Design
Course- B. Des. (Fashion Design)
Course Code- B. Des. (FD)
Student Learning Booklet (SLB)
SLB Sr. No:- _____ Of _____
FDDI
Ministry of Commerce & Industry,
Government of India,
A-10/A, Sector- 24, Noida-201301.
Subject Head Fashion Illustration II
Subject Code BFD 401
Controlled
Acknowledgement
`Asato ma sadgamaya, Tamaso ma jyotirgamaya, Mrtyormaamrtamgamaya’
`Lead me from the asat(lie) to the sat (truth), Lead me from darkness to light, Lead
me from death to immortality.’
Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge and arts, represents the free flow of wisdom and
consciousness. My first acknowledgement is to her blessings. To attain excellence, it is
important that knowledge sharing shall be carried out with best possible methodology so
that quest for knowledge can be achieved. This is the biggest challenge to the human
society and to the institution in particular as they are the torch bearer for disseminating
the knowledge. Project `Saraswati’ has been envisaged with the dream of attaining
excellence in delivery of training by employing best practices in the field of knowledge
sharing.
FDDI as an institution has been pioneer in development of ‘Swayam Siddha’ self-
paced knowledge& skill set based learning materials for the footwear, fashion and retail
sector. This manual represents an extended and thoroughly revised version of notes on
Fashion Design which are collected from books, journals, internet, and other standard
publications.
These manual are primary source of learning and still relevant for delivery of the
training. Project Saraswati is the next logical step in the augmentation of the knowledge
domain. It focuses on standardization of learning material, training delivery, assessment
system and validation system so that knowledge reaches with same light and equal
opportunity of learning is available to all.
FDDI firmly believe that for the attainment of goal, team work is an essential part, while
preparing this manuscript there are many individuals whose names may not appear on
this page but their contribution had been immense as far as development of this
learning material is concerned. The management of FDDI acknowledges contribution of
each and every person involved in the shaping and preparation of this manual.
This entire learning material was reviewed and conformity to the requirement of the
syllabus including deliberation. The training material design guidelines and deliberation
were carried out by Fashion Design Department. FDDI is also grateful to Mr. V. B.
Parvatikar, Advisor (Technical)who has been instrumental in providing resources and
guidance in proactive manner &for providing critical inputs at the time when it was
needed the most.
FDDI also acknowledge other team members notably Mr. Ashish Kumar (Manager,
RCIP) and Mr. Sanjay Kamlay for documentation control and management activity.
FDDI hope that this document will help immensely to the students and teachers alike in
understanding of the subject in more comprehensive and objective way.
It is the reader who provides us the inputs for further improvement. The management of
FDDI welcomes all the suggestions to further improve this learning material.
Rajeev J.Lakhara
I [Controlled]
Instruction Sheet
• This learning guide is developed to provide you the necessary information
regarding the content specified in the index.
• This guide will also assist you to attain the learning outcome stated in the
cover page. Specifically upon the completion of this learning guide, you
will be able to :
- Seek clarification.
- Understanding and execution of the concept.
- Improvise technical skills, based on the practical subject.
1. Read the specific objective of this learning guide.
Guidelines:
2. Read the detailed information given in the units.
3. Accomplish the self-check given twice (one in the middle, the other at the
end) in the complete learning handbook.
4. If you have earned a satisfactory result in self evaluation, then proceed
further. However if your rating is unsatisfactory, see your teacher for
guidance.
5. Submit your accomplished self-check. This will form part of your training
portfolio.
INDEX
TOPICS
1. Proportion of the croquie (female, male and kids)
2. Basic figure drawing.
3. Different types of views (front, three- fourth and profile)
4. Drawing of arms, hands, legs, faces, hairstyles.
5. Photo analysis.
6. Specification drawing of fashion garments and its details. (Flat sketches)
7. Development of designs and costumes.
8. Fabric rendering.
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Fashion Illustrations
The key to great illustrations for fashion design lies in a good knowledge of the human physique and
the mastery of various drawing techniques.
The observation and study of the human body is vital to every fashion designer, the delicate curves
and structures are the origin of all apparel and the perfect setting and surroundings to present them.
Traditionally illustrations were made with pencil, ink and watercolours. Today markers and pens can
do the trick as well and of course adobe Photoshop.
It all starts with Skeletons, if you understand how the human body is constructed the rest will be a
walk in the park and you can illustrate all sorts of poses, stands and materials.
Fashion sketching class will be all about experimentation and refining your drawing abilities, your
knowledge of basic figures and fashion stands will be put to a test. The grey pencil sketches will
come live.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 1
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Skeletons
The human body is literally a big mass of water and protein hanging in and around a
calcium frame. This frame is the skeleton, made out of many different bones. These bones
are the key to drawing the human figure, they are simple to move around and
manipulate. We start every pose with a rough sketch of the skeleton; it will reduce the
risk to draw too big for the paper and at the same time keep the overall figure in the
right proportions before we start the more elaborate drawing of details and clothes etc.
The image below shows how we construct a simple and rough sketch of the skeletal pose
and then add body mass and 'muscles' to get the final pose.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 2
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Female Figure
The classic stand is a figure with relaxed and loose hanging arms and straight legs, fully frontal. A
fashion figurine is an over stretched idea of a normal figure, just like catwalk models are quite far
from having a normal figure.
Sometimes the human body proportions are split down and counted in 'heads' as the smallest unit.
A normal Person would be his or her head around 8 ½ times in height where as a fashion figure could
be up to 9 –10 units. If you closely study real fashion models on international catwalks, In this
example shoulder width and hips have the same width.
If the shoulders are wider the figure will look more masculine, where as wider hips imply more
femininity. Elbows and waist are on the same level. Wrists are roughly a bit lower than the crotch
and the hands therefore even lower. For women the lower legs are generally longer than the upper
leg portion (thighs).
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 3
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
DRAWING THE FASHION FIGURE
AS discussed previously in the section on line quality in Getting Started, learning to draw the figure is
very much like learning to write. In the beginning, you worked on lined paper, used guide lines for
directions, and followed the exact rules of penmanship. The letters soon turned into words, the
wads into sentences, and the sentences into thoughts. After you were really confident with this
process, you were able to concentrate on the content, rather than on how the letters were being
written.
Learning how to draw the fashion figure is a similar process. It is the way you will be able put your
ideas on paper and show the finished product of your designs. Keep in mind that a body is not an
exact measurement, and as we have learned in previous chapters, there are many factors that keep
changing the fashion figure from one period to another.
The figure we will study is often referred to as croquis figure. A croquis a working sketch. It is also a
basic fashion body on which clothing can be designed, flats can be worked, or it can be the take-off
point for more finished art.
Following chapters will concentrate more on such specifics as balance, center front, hands, faces. In
this "chapter, we will study the factual breakdown of the fashion figure. This is the "working with
lined paper" stage of figure drawing and analysis. After thoroughly understanding these principles,
you will begin to slowly work your way into a simple blocking off and gestural approach to drawing
the fashion figure. The ultimate goal is to understand the concept of the figure breakdown. Time and
practice will give you the successful results.
Remember—everyone has their own personal growth rate and no one follows a robot-like order.
There will always be one part of the fashion drawing that is easier than another. For some, the face
will be easy, for others, the torso, and yet others will find rendering to be simple.
The Fashion Figure
In the beginning, there are certain rules of proportion with which you must become familiar. The
figure is measured in "heads," with each head representing one inch. These heads will be used to
indicate and place the different parts of the fashion figure. After some practice, all the "heads" will
suddenly become a figure and after a while you will be drawing!
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 4
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Blocking of a basic croqui figure
We will begin by studying the breakdown of the 10-head fashion figure, first, draw a line down the
paper and divide it into 10 one-inch sections. Label each line, beginning at the top with 0 and ending
at the bottom with 10.
The first section will contain the head, with the chin resting at the 1-inch line.
• 1 ½ “ is the shoulder line.
• 2 ¼ " is the apex for high point) of the bustline.
• 3 ¼ “ is the waistline.
• 3 ½” is the high hip or hip bone.
• 4" is the fullest part of the hip.
• 4 ½ “ is the lowest part of the hip or the crotch.
(This measurement is approximately the middle of the
fashion figure.)
• 6 ½ “ is the knee.
• 9 ¼ “ is the ankle.
• 10 is the toe.
Now let's determine widths. Use the head—laid on its side—
to measure the widths. This will give us a guideline on how
wide parts of the figure will be.
• The shoulders are approximately 1 ½ - to 1 ¾ heads
wide. Any particular fashion style may vary this
measurement.
• The waist is approximately ¾ heads wide.
The hips are approximately 1 ¼ heads wide.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 5
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Now that you are aware of the sections and what they represent, you can start to block off the
figure;
1. Draw an oval in the first section. The neck will touch the shoulder line at first, but then
you will have to draw the trapezius muscles. To do this, place a shallow triangle between
the chin and the shoulder, the top is 'h inch under the chin and touches the end • the
shoulder.
2. To form the torso, bring a line down from the end of the shoulder to the waistline (3'A').
To indicate the hips, draw a line from the waistline to the fullest part of the hip (4").
3. For the legs, draw slightly tapering straight lines from the hip to line 10. For the leg
division, darken e center front line from line 10 to the crotch 4 ½
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 6
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
4. To indicate the feet, draw a triangle on the outside of the legs. The triangle should
extend from line 10 to approximately 9 ¼ , which is the ankle.
5. At the waistline and crotch, draw slightly curved lines. These lines will help in the
placement of the elbow and wrist. Starting at the apex of the bust line, (2 ¼ ) draw the
arms with slightly tapering lines to the crotch (4 ½ ).
6. Block in the hands with rectangles and triangles You now have a basic, blocked off
fashion figure
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 7
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
7. To round it out. place this figure under a tracing or photocopy paper and refine the oval
head. Smooth the line from the neck over the triangle. This will form the trapezius
muscle and the neck flow into the shoulders. Next, round tips of the shoulders. Round
out the line for armpit—through the breasts—to the waist. Now, slightly round the line
from the waist high hip and then round out the hip area. Now slightly round the lines
from the crotch to Straighten the inside of the foot, and then, forearms, draw two
slightly tapered lines from the shoulder to the wrist. Last, blend the rectangles triangles
used for the hands.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 8
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Style Lines
The style lines on the croquis figure should
correspond the style lines on the dress form. They
are extremely important in both drawing and
designing clothes. To duplicate the style lines of a
dress form.
You have an example of the style lines going
through the basic women croqui.
You now have the style lines of the dress form. It
will be of great value to you, not only in drawing
what you design, but in accurate placement of the
fashion details.
Now that you have learned the "alphabet" and the
"penmanship" of the fashion figure, with time and
practice, you will be able to begin to develop the
"content."
Your ultimate goal should be a relaxed, flowing, and
luxurious figure. It should never look overworked—
regardless of how much time it takes to draw. The
garment and pose should be in perfect harmony
with each Other, arid it should, above all, have your
own vision and point of view.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 9
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Balance Line
To achieve a figure that will be "standing" and not falling
over—you must understand the "balance" line. The
balance line is the imaginary straight line that drops from
the pit of the neck to the around. It never bends or goes
more to one side or the other—it is always absolutely
straight.
As an exercise, analyze the balance lines in photographs
from fashion magazines or catalogs. Gather clear photos
of models in simple poses and stay away from highly
distorted or exaggerated poses, with a marker, indicate
the balance lines in color. Indicate the high hips and
supporting legs with another color.
When the figure is standing with equal weight on both legs —either opened or closed—you will
notice that the hips straighten out and the balance line falls between the legs.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 10
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
When the figure puts more weight on one hip than the other, the high hip supports the leg that
balances the figure. This supporting leg begins at the high hip and angles down to touch the balance
line. The supporting leg is always at an angle—it is never straight, some part of the foot should touch
the balance line.
If you place the weight all on one hip, you will notice that the -supporting leg is angled. Try to move
it and your drawing will surely begin to topple. You can, however, move the no supporting leg in
many different positions, and the balance will not be affected. The non supporting leg is completely
moveable and has nothing to do with the balance of the figure. It gives the pose an attitude.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 11
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
In some photographs you will notice that line is slightly off. Remember that when posing in front of a
camera, often she might not have settled her weight when was taken. Also, in some walking poses-
runway shots—the supporting leg might be on the low hip. However, these are exception mind that
each individual pose may have special rule.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 12
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Center Front and Garment Details
When you draw a garment detail, for example a neckline, remember to:
• First, draw from the outside to the center.
• Then, draw from the center to the
outside.
• Make sure that the line is shorter on
the side away from you and is longer
on the side near you.
• Check to see that the center front
seams take an upward curve.
The back view has the same principles as the
front, except the horizontal seams take a
downward curve.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 13
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
To apply the principle of center front when drawing clothing, let's look at buttons and closings. In a
single-breasted garment, the buttons are placed down the middle of the body, or center front, the
closing goes to the side of the center front.
The only times buttons align with center front are in:
1. Button and loop closings
2. Zippers
3. Cardigan jackets
4. Frog and toggle closings
Our drawing can be a shirt, a coat, or a jacket. It can have one button to a dozen. This rule never
changes.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 14
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
In a double breasted garment the buttons are an
equal distance from the center front, regardless of
how close or far apart they are. There are double-
breasted garments—for example, a blazer—where
there are two equal distances between the buttons.
Today, closings can be designed with many different
options, but the buttons should always relate to the
center front. Additionally, the double breasted rules
also apply to side closings — except the nonworking
buttons are left off. As the figure in a double-breasted
garment turns and you sense the perspective of the
body, notice that the shape of the buttons on the
near side are circular and the shape of the buttons on
the far side are oval. In a near-profile view of the
single or double garment, the buttons are placed on
the out.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 15
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Gestures Movement or Action Lines
Ultimately, we want our fashion figure to have a wonderful flow and movement. A fashion figure
would look as if she danced onto the page—as if there is no effort at all in her gestures. In this
chapter we will study the movement or gesture lines, which help to determine both the movement
and the pose of figure. Remember, to make a fashion drawing which requires a lot of effort,
knowledge, and practice.
To help you understand the movement of lines of a figure, open up a fashion magazine to draw
flowing lines over fashion photography what you think the direction or gesture of the lines might be.
What will happen is that you will abstractly register how the figure could move.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 16
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Since your eyes begin to sense a certain flow, you can begin to get more specific and analyze the
movements. Depending on the sense, the figure may seem:
Next, duplicate these movements on paper by using your finger as a drawing tool. Let your fingers
sense the gesture, movement, and action. Now, with a pencil or marker duplicate these gestures on
paper.
Don't even think about accuracy. This is simply an exercise and you can throw the end results away.
When you begin to feel confident with this exercise, start to actually draw the gestures on paper.
Start to actually draw the gestures on paper. Start with you first reaction and keep drawing over the
previous lines almost as if you were building up the figure's gestures from scratch. Start observing
the relationship of one body part to another. Aim for more and more accuracy. The following four
sections are short studies of different types of figures in various gestures or movements.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 17
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The “S” Curve
This is one of the most fashionable gestures or poses. It is also a very important movement- the
crunch and stretch.
From the front view, to have a pronounced high hip movement. The line from head to the high hip,
and from the hip to the resting foot will form an "S" curve Notice how the side of the figure with the
high hip slightly crunches between the breasts and hips and stretches on the opposite side.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 18
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Male Figure
The construction of a male body varies only slightly from that of a female. The main characteristics
are:
 Broader shoulders and smaller hips
 Almost absent waist
 Upper and lower leg almost same length.
The general appearance of a male body is sharper and more chiselled due to less body fat and more
muscles.
The 8 or 8 1/2 head idea remains and if we want to achieve a more masculine look we can play with
the -V- shape of the body, meaning broader shoulders and smaller hips so it optically looks like the
letter V. Also accentuating muscles will make it more masculine.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 19
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
MEN’s basic Figure Template
Place a sheet of tracing paper over your template
and drop a red vertical line through the center of
the measured spaces to establish a "plumb" or
Balance Line. Working with a #2 or HB pencil,
draw an oval for the head and then work your
way down the body indicating the geometric
forms for the men's fashion figure.
1. Once you have established the forms,
roughly block in the shoulders, chest, and
abdomen on a second tracing overlay.
Remember that a masculine fashion
physique is not necessarily bulky.
2. Loosely sketch the rest of the figure.
3. Refine your drawing to include details for the face, hands, and feet.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 20
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 21
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 22
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 23
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Men's Back Figure
Male Proportions
1
There is no set rule for proportions in fashion illustration. For certain
kinds of clothes and/or age groups, you may want to veer danger-
ously close to reality; for others, you may want to exaggerate outra-
geously. But these charts give you some basis for comparison, and a
2 starting point when you are developing your first figures.
Male Figure Checklist
1. Most beginners
Basic Male
make guy torsos
3 too short, and this
does not flatter
most garments.
2. Long legs look
good on males,
4 but for a younger,
street look the
legs should be
kept in check.
3. Any figure propor-
5 tion change will
also affect the gar-
ment proportion,
unless you are just
doing Speedos.
4. A too-small head
6 proportion makes
him a “pinhead”—
not a good look.
5. Hands and feet
need to be large
7 enough to look
masculine. The
hand is the size of
the face, the side
view foot is the
size of the head.
8 6. As you do with
females, add the
most leg length
from the knee
down.
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Proportion
Chart 10
This figure has a little less torso (four and
one-third heads) and a little more leg (five
and one-third heads.)
This torso is four and one-half heads. The
legs are about five heads.
Note: As we will see in later chapters,
younger guys will be closer to nine heads
and elegant fashion guys may be more
like ten.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 24
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Torso
Much of the beautiful movement in fashion
poses is created by the opposition of the two
key structural elements in the torso, the rib
cage and the pelvis. You can see in our exam- HS
ple figure the high shoulder (HS) and the high
hip (HH), which reflect the opposing tilt of these
two dominant forms. But the flexibility of the
torso comes from the spine, and the forward
position of the neck is dictated by the shape of
the seven cervical vertebrae (A). The curve of
the back and hip demonstrate the shape of the
thoracic (B) and lumbar vertebrae (C), as well
as the sacrum and coccyx (D).
The front view of the torso is shaped by the
ribcage and the pelvis, as well as the muscula-
ture that is supported by the bones. Some
bones or parts of bones are just beneath the
skin, and their shapes are visible on the surface
of the body. (See Skeletal Landmarks, below.)
The more muscular development a physique HH
is subjected to, the more the muscle definition
will stand out. In contrast, a very young or thin
physique can be quite shapeless.
SKELETAL LANDMARKS
Brow
Ridge
Plane of
Sternum
Clavicle
A
Seventh
Cervical
Vertebrae
Profile
of
Scapula
The Spine
As you can see, the spine has an S curve
built into its shape. And because it is flex-
ible, we can stretch and compress in all
directions. Our torso can move forward,
back, and sideways whenever we want.
Keep the shape of the spine in mind
at all times, and be able to locate it in
Profile of B
Rib Cage
Rib
Indications Elbow
any pose. This is especially important for
the angle of the neck. I often see the
neck angled incorrectly, which makes
figures look stiff and uncomfortable.
Hipbone Radius
and
Ulna
Metacarpal
BONES OF THE SPINE
C (A). Seven cervical vertebrae;
(B). twelve thoracic vertebrae;
(C). five lumbar vertebrae;
(D). sacrum and coccyx.
D Note: The neck always slants forward
from the curve of the back.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 25
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BONES AND MUSCLES OF THE TORSO
The
humerus
connects
into the
scapula.
The
scapula
and the
clavicle
connect
here.
The
clavicle
and the
scapula
move in an
arc, along
with the
upper arm.
Clavicle
Sternomastoid
Trapezius
Deltoid
Pectoralis
Scapula
Serratus
Rectus
Abdominus
Humerus
External
Obliques
Rectus
Abdominus
The bones and muscles of the
body make a wonderful part-
nership that keeps us upright
and moving with incredible
endurance. (We can outlast
almost any animal over a long
distance.) The muscle groups
of the front torso are fairly sim-
ple. The trapezius wraps from
the back and attaches into
the clavicle, as does the
deltoid. The pectoralis also
comes out of the clavicle and
the sternum. The front plane
is formed by the rectus ab-
dominus; the side plane by
the serratus, obliques, and
gluteus medius.
MAJOR MUSCLE GROUPS
Gluteus
Medius
Anatomy may or may not be your thing, but
having a working understanding of these key
elements can really inform your work and allow
you to progress to a different level.
Front View Torso
Gender Differences
As you can see by examples A and B,
the male torso is much longer and
less curved than the female torso.
The shoulders are wider, the waist is
less defined, and the hips are nar-
rower. Example B shows the simple
geometric forms of the two different
torsos. Keeping these shapes in mind
will be very helpful when you create
A figures.
Male Female
B
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 26
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Medi
Glute
Maxi
SCAPULA
Trapezius
Deltoid
Latissimus
Dorsi
External
Obliques
Gluteus
us
us
mus
Curve of
the Spine
Planes of the Male, Back View
Structure of the Back
Understanding the planes and muscles of the back, along with the skeletal land-
marks, is especially helpful when rendering your figures. The male back is a
broad expanse and is hard to define without the anatomical subtleties to help.
Overrendering does not work either. We want to understand where things are
but not be distracted by the details. Any three-quarter back must reflect the
curve of the spine. The trapezius, latissimus dorsi (Lats), and gluteus maximus
are the primary muscle groups, and the deltoid wraps around and connects into
the scapula. The trapezius also connects into the upper rim of the scapula.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 27
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 28
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
DRAWING LITTLE GIRLS
As growth in the limbs accelerates, the head now constitutes one-fifth of the total height. First
determine the measurements for your little girl's proportion template (use the information provided
above right).Then modifies the infant's geometric forms for an elongated figure. This will lay the
groundwork for your preliminary sketch of the little girl. Once you refine the drawing you can move
on to other views and variations of the figure. Little girls have developed surer footing, so poses can
become more ambitious, reflecting greater activity.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 29
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Little Boys
Although there are small gender differences (the boy will have a slightly longer torso) you can use
the same general figure proportion for both little girls and boys.
You can use the same measurements as for your little girl's proportion template. Then block in the
geometric forms as groundwork for your preliminary sketch. Although the little boy's figure has
begun to mature and elongate, the belly is still quite round—especially when seen in profile.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 30
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
PHOTO ANALYSIS
As an exercise, try taking a simple realistic pose from a magazine. If you like, it can be a runway pose.
Put a piece of tracing paper over, the photograph and analyze what the figure is doing. Look for:
• Balance
• Center front
• Shoulders, waist, and hip movement
• Supporting leg
• Non supporting leg
• Arm
Next, go through fashion magazines and analyze the movements in the photographs directly with a
magic marker. Always choose photographs that seem as though the model is directly in front of you,
taking a natural pose. Avoid extreme, trendy, or artsy poses that have distorted positions or
proportions. Also, don't use photos in which the photographer has created a highly personal mood.
Remember, you want to create the mood.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 31
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Model Drawing Poses
These are full front poses also described as high hip or low shoulder poses due to the model’s
stance. Each of the four poses presents another form of figure analysis to help you apply these
drawing techniques to your sketching process.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 32
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BALANCE LINE
This is the same type of balance line/ figure posing support. A balance line drops from the pit of the
neck, down through the pose, stopping at the feet, on the floor of your page, it keeps the pose
standing up, not tipping over (of balance).
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 33
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
This pose can be used as guidelines, structure to pin your figure sketching on, or visual r to work with
as you build the figure.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 34
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
THE FACE
The Soul of every sketch
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 35
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Female Face
The female face is loosely speaking a more oval shape, with smooth and round lines, giving a soft
and aesthetic impression. Full lips and eyes with lashes make it feminine. The nose can be smaller
and if the cheekbones are accentuated we can add some fierceness.
The female eyebrows are usually a good bit higher up than the male eyebrows, this opens and
enlarges the whole eye area, and the 50% rules still apply.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 36
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Eye positions
Depending on how the eyes are placed, the overall feeling of the face can be altered. In general low
set eyes give a cute and child like appearance where as high set eyes suggest maturity and
adulthood. The base position is in the exact middle following the 50% rules.
NORMAL EYE POSITION
High set Eyes – Adult Face Low set Eyes- Baby Face
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 37
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 38
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 39
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 40
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
The Male Face
Faces can be easily constructed using a 50 percent rule. The eyes are exactly in the middle of
the vertical the nose bridge in the middle of the horizontal guide of the face. The nostrils
mark the middle of the lower half of the face and the mouth marks the middle of the lowest
quarter of the face.
The male face is generally speaking a rather square than round set up with an accentuated
jaw line and a wide chin. The eyebrows are low set and visible Adams apple can be sketched
to make the appearance even more masculine. Eyes and lips shouldn't be too strong in
order to avoid a makeup effect.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 41
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Creating a front view Template
First as for the women's head, the front view is a good place to start. Approximate the same
vertical landmarks and widths for adult features as indicated. Use shadows and highlights to
accentuate a more chiselled bone structure and prominent features.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 42
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Creating a Three- quarter view template
As noted in turning the women's head, vertical placement of the features will remain constant
rotation. The Center Front line will turn with the head; the two halves of the face will no longer be
equal in appearance as the side of the face turning from view becomes foreshortened. The Center
Front line, which appeared straight in the front view, becomes curved for the three-quarter view.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 43
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Creating a profile view template
Similar to the women’s profile you will require a square as a starting point.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 44
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Children's Heads
The design and illustration of kids' clothing tends to be more imaginative and whimsical and
so when it comes to drawing children's faces you will want to take similar creative license.
Overly realistic drawing tends to age the appearance of children's faces. As well as being
stylized, your illustrations should also convey attitude.
A consistent drawing style must be adapted for the different age groups. As noted during
infancy the head is extremely large in relation to the body. The ratio of head to body size
changes as the baby matures. For example, an infant's head is one-quarter of its total body
height; by age five or six, the head equals one-sixth of the height. You are under no
obligation to precisely duplicate this ratio. But no matter what head-to-body ratio you
choose, there should be a relative proportion between the age groups.
The face must reflect other developmental changes, too. Children's faces not only grow
larger but also longer over time. The bridge of the nose, which is barely visible in infancy,
becomes more defined. Faces become increasingly distinguished by gender. Boys' heads
take on a more rectangular appearance as
the jaw becomes
A Relative proportion of adults 'and little
Stylization must be brought consistently
across all age groups.
A relative proportion of adults and little kid’s
head.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 45
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Different angles
With a little bit of practice and a good eye you can try to manipulate the position of the
head. Turn it a bit to the left or right, show it in full profile, tilt it up or turn it down.
The skull illustrations taken from an old Thai sketching handbook, a couple of pages earlier
can give you an idea of how the eyes and nose and mouth positions will change and the
shape of the head looks like.
Especially when working with a live model we can closely study their faces from various
points of view. The shadows that the facial features cast are essential to accentuate
different angles.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 46
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Shadow Play
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 47
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Eyes & lips
Eyes can have various shapes and forms. Cat like, round, almond shaped, with or without
a crease. The arch of the eyebrow usually corresponds to the outer edge of the Iris.
A simple rule is that the distance between the two Eyes shall be as wide as one eye. The mouth
about the same size or slightly bigger.
Look at the lines on the right and how
the facial features are arranged and
correspond to each other. This is not a
random occurrence but based upon
principles that determine the beauty of
a face. As many other things the beauty
lays in proportions and evenness.
Take a look at the various sketches of
eyes and lips and you will see how just
little variations change the look.
Especially for the lips. For masculine
faces we try to keep the lines simple
and light where as for feminine face we
can accentuate them. Especially the
eyeliner.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 48
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Facial expressions
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 49
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Faces can have a million different shapes and expressions, whatever expression you choose will
directly affect the mood of your sketch. The easiest way to change the mood is by changing the eyes
and lips, happiness, sadness, anger, an easy exercise.
The face plays an important role for your
designs. The whole head is the soul of every
sketch. Hair-style, shape and expression send
out a message that can reinforce your ideas or
do the contrary.
As you can see drawing hair doesn't need
hundreds of lines, each for every hair. The
general shape and some lines to indicate
strands are perfectly fine. Think of the
hairstyle thing of the details, do they work
with your clothes and the general idea of your
inspiration?
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 50
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI
Questionnaire:
Q. Draw the various degrees of rotation of a men’s and women’s head.
Maintaining the same likeness viewed at different degrees of rotation.
Q. Analyze the photograph given below and sketch a stick and a flesh figure of
the same.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 51
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
SELF CHECK (ANSWERS)
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 52
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
SELF CHECK (ANSWERS)
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 53
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Hands
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 54
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Women’s Hand
In order to understand the three-dimensional volume, first analyze the hand in terms of simple
geometric forms.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 55
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Hands a masterful skill but better some simple lines than finger less stumps. Give it a try and you will
find that it's not so hard in the end. You can see an extract from the same vintage Thai sketching
handbook, with beautiful illustrations of various hand positions.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 56
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Men's Hands
Men's hands are squarer in appearance, with knuckles and bony structures having greater
prominence.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 57
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Children’s Hands
Infant's and children's hands must also be highly stylized for fashion drawing. As children grows, the
size, proportion, and structure of their hands changes. Babies and younger kids have short, round
fingers and chubby knuckles which slim and elongate with maturity. By the time a child reaches
seven, the shape of the hand is quite similar to that of an adult, only smaller. The younger the child,
the shorter and rounder the fingers. A child's hand gestures reflect a specific level of dexterity
depending on their age
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 58
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
LEGS
Legs are not just straight lines with feet attached, due to the intricate play of muscles and bones
under the skin; we can make out a distinctive shape.
Well sketched legs are a sign of sophistication and can improve any fashion sketch. Legs should be
long and slender with a sculptured knee and a faint idea of muscle, especially around the calf region
in the lower part.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 59
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Feet
As with other parts of the body, it will be helpful to imagine a geometric shape—a wedge—as the
starting point for drawing the foot. The relative proportion of this wedge compared to the total body
height will be key. When first beginning, there is a tendency to draw very small feet.
As with other parts of the body, you must have a working knowledge of the movement of the foot
and leg. For example, when the heel is flat on the ground, the foot and leg come together at a right
angle. As the heel elevates, this angle is expanded and, when viewed from the front, more of the
instep becomes visible and the ankle is raised. Conversely, when the foot is flat, there is a
foreshortening of the instep in the front view and a lowering of the ankle.
The right and left foot are seldom seen in the same position or from the same point of view. For
example, the right foot may be seen head-on (front view), while the left is partially or fully turned.
The leg and foot positions in your fashion drawing should seem natural, corresponding to the
rotation of the rest of the body. The way in which you stylize the foot should also have a relationship
with the rest of your drawing.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 60
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing the Side View Foot
The inside and outside edges of the foot are anatomically different, so you must first decide which
foot (right or left) you are drawing and from what point of view While the outside edge of the foot
makes full contact with the floor, the inside edge has a slight elevation in the center where the arch
forms a bridge between the ball and heel. Turning the foot affects the order in which you see the
toes. For the interior side view, the big toe is seen first and largely obscures the other four toes.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 61
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Drawing Men's and Children's Feet
Advice for drawing men's and children's hands will carry over to the feet. The men's foot will be less
delicate and squarer. For infants and children, the relationship between the feet and the body as a
whole will change as the child matures. Babies and little kids have relatively large and chubby feet.
Since very young infants are unable to walk, they are usually drawn in sitting or crawling positions,
and the bottoms of their feet are often in view. For bigger kids, the foot begins to thin and is smaller
in relation to the body as a whole. Shoe styles also become more sophisticated as the child moves
toward adulthood.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 62
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Shoes
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 63
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Flat Sketching Basic Garment Details and Silhouettes
As a preliminary step toward drawing the clothed high hip figure, you will first identify and draw
some basic garments as flats (technical drawings). Working with the static flats figure, will give you
the opportunity to observe the most basic construction details and silhouettes without the
complications that result from body movement and foreshortening.
Flat Sketching a Basic Shirt
For this exercise you will use a flats figure as a guide to maintain a relative proportion. Begin by
folding a half inch (1.5cm) flap from the topmost edge of a sheet of tracing paper. Position this flap
over the top edge of your flats figure, securing it with masking tape on the back. If possible, work
from a sample garment and begin your flat sketch:
NOTE: The Shirt front extension (where two front sides of a shirt overlap) is gender-specific; closing
proper right over left for women, and left over right for men.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 64
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
There are many ways to finish a flats presentation:
• Inking the flats by hand using felt tip markers is a traditional method and a good technique
to master for the times when you do not have access to a computer. Technical drawing tool
such as circle and ellipse templates, French curves, and rulers can be combined with
freehand drawing as appropriate for the different garment details (for example, drapery is
best drawn freehand, structural details such as plackets with a ruler). Be sure to use a variety
of stroke weights—reserving the heaviest for the outside edge, with progressively lighter
stroke weights for seams and topstitching.
• When you are pressed for time, scan the pencil flat, clean it up in Photoshop, and export to
Illustrator for a Live Trace. This preserves the spontaneity of the preliminary sketch, while
converting the pencil sketch to a more finished "inked" drawing.
• Depending on your computer skills, you can also translate a scan of your pencil sketch in
Illustrator using the various mechanical and freehand drawing tools—again as they relate to
the different garment details. If you intend to render your flat, you must create closed paths
that can be easily filled with pattern and color. Also, take care to create separate paths for
the outside edges and construction details so that you can manipulate the hierarchy of
stroke Weights. This can be quite time consuming, but the end result will be "resolution
independent"—meaning that the line will remain crisp no matter how much you reduce or
enlarge the sketch. Vector images created in Illustrator also have the added benefit of
having smaller file sizes that are easier to e-mail.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 65
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Flat Sketching Low-rise Pleated Pants
The first design consideration for any bottom garment is the length of the seam that runs up the
Center Front, as this will determine where garment sits relative to the natural waist. On pants, or
trousers, this Seam is referred to as the rise. Pants with a longer rise seams are also used for drop-
crotch silhouettes such as dhoti pants. Pants with shorter rise seams sit lower on the body, beneath
the natural waist. For this exercise you will flat sketch basic low-rise pants with an extension
waistband.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 66
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 67
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 68
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 69
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 70
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 71
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 72
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 73
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 74
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 75
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 76
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 77
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Sketching fabrics needs a good eye and proper observation, there are no rules but looking closely at
the intricate play between shadow and light that fabric drapes form gives an idea how to reproduce
the same effect on to paper.
Since a human body is not a flat plane, fabric usually drapes around the body and somewhat reveals
what underneath.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 78
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING DENIMS
Step 1 Base color
Including all the details, draw the garment you want to make look like it’s made of
denim. Denim clothes are usually stiff and when you draw the folds make sure
they don’t look too soft.
Lay down the first layer of color. The final version of the jacket will get much darker,
so pick a light blue for base.
Tip: The technique described in this tutorial can be applied to every single color in
the palette. It is absolutely not obligatory to use blue as base color for your denim
drawing.
Step 2 Shadows
Draw the shadows using a second layer of the same color or a slightly darker shade.
Normally the clothes create shadows where there are creases or one surface is in
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 79
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
front of another ( see the pocket). Also notice how the color of the collar changes in depth.
The same happens with the sleeve.
Step 3 Add some texture
Start adding narrowed lines all over the fabric. Make sure that the lines look organized
and follow the same direction. It is best to use a color pencil in a very similar shade to the
base color.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 80
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 4 Even more texture
In the places where there are shadows repeat the process, but using black/dark grey color
pencil. For the places you think are brighter use a white pencil.
Tip: Color pencils are good to represent denim in fashion sketches, because they already
have the crispy texture we are looking for.
Try not to overwork your drawing with black and white lines. If you do so, erase the
unnecessary ones.
Step 5 A realistic denim fabric
Take your white pencil again and this time make strong vertical bleached effects. They
are supposed to hint where the jeans clothes are worn-out. Put those only where the volume
of the body is the most bulged.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 81
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 6 Add some details to those clothes
Find an orange or brownish shade that will overlay the base color of the jeans and underline
the stitches. This is very specific for jeans. Color the buttons and if you have any other
details.
Step 7 Smoother
You already have it done, but if the fabric looks too sharp for your taste I recommend you to
take a paper blender and go over some parts of the sketch. This will give nice polished look
of your fashion drawing.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 82
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 83
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC FABRIC RENDERING: FUR
Step 1: Draw the outline
After drawing the fashion figure, dress it with the fur garment that you have in mind. Avoid
pushing too hard with the pencil, since you are going to erase this outline later.
Tip: Remember that fur clothes are pretty voluminous and they outstand from the body more
than regular clothes would.
Step 2: Base: Color spots
Take a soft pastel in a color of your choice and lay down spots all over your design.
Try to make most of the color spots pointing in one direction and place them not too far away
from each other.
Step 3: Fur base
Smudge the color spots with your finger. Move your finger from the upper part of the
garment towards the bottom. Don’t smudge it in a circular or any other direction.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 84
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Fur is a soft fabric, so don’t try to lock it in the boundaries of the clothes you are drawing – it
is okay if your finger smudges a little bit outside of your initial outlines.
Erase the pencil outline of the garment.
Tip: For better results leave the surface unevenly color. It’s okay if some areas are lighter
than others.
Step 4: 1st Layer
Fur is a fabric that consists of many layers and separate hairs. Take slightly darker color
than the one you used for the base and spread new color spots. If you play with their sizes
the fur will eventually look more realistic and eye-catching.
Step 5: 2nd layer
Smudge the color spots from the previous step, keeping the same direction of the hairs and
draw the next fur layer. This one should be in even darker color – light or dark grey,
sometimes even black could be used.
These hairs should be much smaller and set further away from each other (if compared to
the previous steps). Notice that now the direction of the hairs may vary slightly.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 85
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Tip: Draw the fur hairs in the centre part and in the side parts of the clothes. Don’t
concentrate only on the middle part, leaving the sides empty.
Step 6: White
Smudge the spots from the previous step and take a white soft pastel. Adding white hairs will
complement the final look and make it three dimensional.
Be careful with the white because it is tricky – if you overwork it the drawing will look
bleached and flat.
Step 7: Final touches
Grab a sharp color pencil in a color several shades darker than the base color of your
design. Go over the initial boundaries using short lines in different sizes. Their direction may
vary slightly and sometimes you can join two lines so that they look like a little triangle.
Allow yourself to go bravely over any accessories that are placed over your fur clothes belts
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 86
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
bags, jewelleries.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 87
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING CHIFFON
Step 1: The color of your fabric
The first thing you need to do when drawing chiffon or other type of transparent fabric is to
decide on its color. See-through materials will show what’s underneath, but will change its
color.
Start by coloring the areas that are not covered by the chiffon. If the chiffon is light prepare a
lighter shade of the skin tone and the clothes color. If the chiffon is dark – prepare darker
shade of the skin tone and the clothes.
Step 2: Color the areas covered by the chiffon
Start coloring the areas that are underneath the sheer fabric. Make sure you are not filling
them in all the way to the edge. It’s okay if the coloring isn’t perfectly smooth at this point.
You can play with the direction of your strokes as long as you stay in the outlines.
Step 3: Color the chiffon fabric
With the color you’ve picked gently mark the folds of the chiffon. It is important not to outline
the sheer fabric or fully fill it with color at this point. You want to just gently brush trough
some areas and nothing more.
Step 4: Add another layer
Grab s lighter shade of your chiffon color and add some more strokes. The opacity should be
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 88
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
greater close to the outline and getting lighter towards the inside. Take your time to make the
transitions smooth and nice and try not to cover all the white spaces left from Step 2.
Step 5: Add some pastel
Use a soft pastel and carefully fill in almost the whole chiffon fabric. Leave empty spaces
here and there and don’t make this layer too opaque. You want to place less amount of the
pastel at the areas where you see only the sheer fabric and nothing underneath.
Tip: For best results use your fingers (or a cotton swab) to take small amount of the pastel
and gently smudge over your design.
Step 6: Add depth
It’s time to add some shadows and definition to your sheer garment. Use a pencil and go
back to the folds to draw shadowed areas where you think they should be. Also emphasize
the outlines underneath the chiffon in case they have disappeared. Don’t overwork it – less
is more when drawing transparent materials.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 89
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 7: Outlines
As you know, a fashion sketch would look unfinished and fuzzy if you skip the outlining.
Always use a shade slightly darker than you original tone and outline everything except
for the areas underneath the chiffon.
Tip: Outline the chiffon itself but leave the skin and clothes underneath as they are. This way
they will look blurred and softer helping you to create the illusion of transparent textiles.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 90
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING LACES
Step 1 Base colour
First thing you need to do is to find a darker than the skin tone colour and render the
fabric with it.
Tip: If you can’t find a proper shade just add a little bit of black to your skin tone
colour and use it to colour the clothes you want.
Step 2 Shadows
Lay down some shadows to give your illustration more dimension. Draw the
shadows as if your model was not wearing any clothes.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 91
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 3 The mesh
Draw net mesh all over the place where the lace is going to be. For best results use
a well-sharpened pencil.
Step 4 Lace ornaments
The lace pattern should follow the diagonal direction of the mesh. Try to leave equal
space between the ornaments and put the next row of pattern as shown in the
picture (every ornament lays in the middle of the space between those above it )
You shouldn’t worry about making all of the figures exactly the same size and form.
Just think of easy to repeat pattern and allow yourself to make some variations of it.
Step 5
Ink with black the ornaments. Don’t forget to play with the width of the lines!
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 92
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 6
Use the pencil again and draw small crosses between the ornaments. Again follow
the mesh directions.
Step 7
Attached some leaves to the ornaments. Fill about 2/3 of leaf body with black ink.
Tip: Most of the lace fabrics have some kind of floral motives. However, if you don’t
like flowers for any reason feels free to experiment with abstract forms on your liking.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 93
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 8
Use dots for the contour of the leaves. This will add a lot of lace sensation to your
drawing.
Step 9 The endings
Draw half-circles to cover the end of the lace. I make the outline double for a more
complete look.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 94
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 10
Put a “X” in every semicircle. Let it overshoot the borders of the circle.
Step 11
Finish by drawing small dots on top of the X marks and a wavy line a bit higher.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 95
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING LEATHER PANTS
Step 1 A perfect fashion body
Start by choosing an appropriate pose to show the best of your design. Often fashion
illustrators would choose a pose of the model that is showing the side hem of the
pants, but here I have picked a front view walking pose.
Step 2 Design the pants
draw the trousers with the belt loops, the pockets and the hems that are
visible. Leave enough volume, so that the pants don’t look like tights. Even if you are
designing a slim fit pants note that there is still some volume around the legs,
especially in the lower part of the leg.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 96
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 3 Draw the folds
Leather pants have very specific folds. Usually they are many and they are sharp
and tiny. Draw horizontal folds that affect the outline of the pants. Pay special
attention to the crotch area, around the knees and in the lower end of the leg. Some
of the folds are not horizontal, but slightly tilted - they should be the exception, not
the rule.
Step 4 The big secret of drawing leather
When you are ready with your design and have drawn the outline you are only half
way done. The rendering of the leather is the really tricky part.
Using a pencil double the contour of the pants, but a few millimeters in. Note that the
contour is not perfect – some parts of it are missing, some are thin, others are
thicker. The diversity of the line is really important! Double some of the main folds as
well.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 97
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
You may want to contour the biggest ones and those around the crotch.
Step 5 Color
Take a black marker and color everything except for the selections you did in the
previous step. Erase the selections and refine with a black pen if needed (close to
some smaller folds for example).
Tip: If you have some details of the pants that you don’t want to lose (as are the
pockets in the example illustration) just go around, leaving them white. Or you can
come back later with a white gel pen of white gauche and draw the details again).
Step 6 Reflections
Leather is a shiny fabric. In order to make it look believable you have to add more
reflections to the pants. Take a light grey colored pencil and draw some highlights in
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 98
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
the middle of the legs. Again you can interrupt the highlight.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 99
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING OF FISHNET
Step 1: The base
Start your illustration by preparing a clean fashion figure. Since you will be erasing in
next steps it’s better to ink you figure now.
Step 2: Hot places
Mark the most bulged parts of the figure. Often times they are in the middle of all
shapes. Bulged are the middle of the hips zone, the tights, the knee and the muscles
of the calves.
Tip: To find easily which are the “hot places” try imagining that you were creating the
figure out of clay. It helps if you close eyes and move your hand if you were really
sculpting it. You will easily recognize the closest to you places.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 100
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 3: Cold places
In order to make sure the illustration will be really 3-dimentional you need to mark
the “cold places” too. This is where the shapes are curving back. Usually this is at
the edges of all forms and in the places where you have an object partially covered
by another one. The former will be a shaded, cold zone. Mark close to the outlines,
under the knees and the top part of the back leg.
Tip: To help yourself you can imagine you are a sculptor again. Cold places are
where you hand moves away from you and you curl your fingers.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 101
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 4: Draw fishnet base
Keep the latter two steps in mind ( or make a separate cheat list to look at it later)
and cover the legs with an ordinary mesh. Don’t transform the lines in any way – just
straight, simple, non-dimensional fishnet.
Step 5: Add some volume
Open your cheat list or recall the “hot places” – the most bulged parts of the fashion
figure. Now erase them from the fishnet base, leaving the space white.These are the
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 102
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
places where, because of the volume underneath, the netting will be deformed.
Step 6: A realistic fishnet
Now fill the blank space with nettings again, but this time you will make the lines
slightly curved up in the middle. Make sure that all lines are aligned and are
connecting like they did before.
Step 7: Cold places volume
Now isolate the zones that you defined as “cold places”. This is where the shapes go
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 103
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
further away from the viewer. Don’t erase anything- just recall where they were.
Step 8: Finished illustration
Double the lines from the cold places. Everything that falls into a cold place
should become darker, as it’s clearly visible in the example illustration. Ink your
drawing and erase all the unnecessary pencil lines.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 104
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING OF FLOWER PATTERN
Step 1: Draw the basics
Before you start you need to draw with clean lines the clothes that are about to get
your print design. Make sure you have all the details carefully drawn and all the
unnecessary lines- erased.
Step 2: The secret of drawing prints
The most essential thing about drawing any kind of pattern is to remember that
clothes are not flat. If the fabric is distorted in any way, so will be its print too.
In the example illustration I have marked with red the folds that stand out closer to
the viewer.
Tip: Quick technique to understand which part of the ruffles or folds is closer to you:
try to close your eyes and think of the clothes as if they were made of clay.
Tip: When drawing prints always have in mind that the pattern will get transform
according to the volume of the clothes. So think in advance for the volume and the
folds you have.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 105
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 3: The folds Distortion Rule
To make sure that all the flowers are the same size and are evenly spread over the
fabric, simplify their form and start filling the surface of the dress. Notice how the
their shape gets distorted because of the volume of the folds. Don’t just draw the
pattern, but think of the volumes you identified in the previous step.
Tip: The deepest the folds are, the more distorted the pattern gets.
Step 4:
Fill the rest of the dress surface with the print. Note that sometimes the center of the
flower will happen to be in the deepest part of a fold. In this situation you will move
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 106
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
the tips of the florets slightly up, as they intersect with the Red shaded areas.
Step 5:
Draw flowers that are at the outline of the dress. Cut them in half or in other creative
ways to show that they are wrapping around the body. Keep following the Folds
distortion rule when you pass though Red shaded areas.
Step 6: Floral patterns
Once you have set the number, size and interaction with folds of your flower design it
is time to draw it with more details. Don’t forget about your previous work here –
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 107
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
follow closely the flower guidelines with all their distortions.
Step 7:
Finish all the details of your flower print. Add leaves, sparkles or whatever you like to
make it look beautiful. Use your imagination, be creative!
Step 8: Color
It is time to fill your fashion design with fun, vibrant spring colors or tender muted
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 108
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
tones. Pick shades that will bring out the best of your design.
Step 9: Add some shadows
The most important thing when adding shadows to your design is to darken the
flowers pattern as well as the background. The shadows will go to the deepest parts
of folds (that were not shaded in red areas).
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 109
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING OF SEQUINS FABRIC
Step 1 Base color
Start by laying down a flat color all over your design. You don’t need to make the
color appear perfectly flat, just cover the whole area you are planning to draw the
sequins.
Step 2 Drawing the sequins rows
Next draw the sequins. Find a pen in a little bit darker shade and cover like 1/2 of the
fabric with interceding circles. Notice that the rows of sequins are not from the top of
the dress to it’s hemline. Sequins are drawn here and there just to hint the
impression of such fabric.
Step 3 Adding highlights
Now add with white gel pen (or gouache) the highlights. Use the same technique of
building the sequins row as in the previous step.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 110
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Cover no more than 1/4 of the fabric with white sequins or it will look very unrealistic
in the end.
Tip: Even if you are drawing a black sequin dress I would still recommend you to
draw the highlights in pure white. Sequins have high contrast and using the pure
white helps you represent it.
Step 4 Brighter!
Fill some of the white sequins. Maybe the first one or two of each row.
You can also draw some glittering stars to make the impressions of sequins fabric
even stronger.
Step 5 Blend it
Using a white pencil try to blend some of the sequins rows. Pick rows that are
already close to each other and concentrate only on one of the sides of the dress.
Again – you don’t want to overwork it!
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 111
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 6 Draw the shadows
Finally take a pencil that is a few tones darker than your base color and mark some
random darker rows.
You can also use it to add volume to your design (e.g. under the breast and in the
deepest folds usually)
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 112
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING OF SILK & SATIN
Step 1: How to draw the folds
Different fabrics behave in different ways and the first step when drawing silk or satin
is to make sure the folds are looking correct. Very specific for these textiles is that
they form big folds that fall heavily, but also they create a lot of small creases in the
pressure points. When drawing silk and satin make sure you include all these types
of folds: 1. The “returning” type (collars, around crotch areas); 2. Many, small and
angular folds (usually around waistline) 3. Big, heavy folds (usually in the lower
part of the dress). The “How to draw folds:……” series will help you find the right
place for them.
Step 2: Paint the base color
For the base color pick something that is slightly darker than the final result you are
looking for. Use markers, tempera of watercolors to make the base as flat and even
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 113
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
as you can. Do NOT use color pencils for this step.
Step 3: Finding shapes
Even if you are not familiar with lightning and shadows you will be able to set the
lighter parts of the design using the technique from “How to draw gold” tutorial.
Here is how it works: Imagine that you are building your design out of clay like if it
was a sculpture. The light goes to the parts where you are moving your hands
towards yourself- the most bulged ones. Use a soft pastel and mark these areas
gently. Be careful not to overwork it though – you want to keep about half of the
original base color untouched.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 114
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Tip: The highlight color needs to be to be a lot brighter and more saturated than the
base. Avoid using pure white and go for bright yellow (green, orange, brown fabrics)
bright pink ( red, purple, magenta fabrics) and sky blue for navy fabrics like in the
example above.
Step 4: Blending
Blending is essential step when drawing silk and satin fabrics. Use your fingers or
preferably a q-tip to blend the pastel. Try not to exceed the original proportion and
size you have set in step 3. Erase if you notice that more than ½ of the design is in
this soft, blended shade.
Step 5: Add some magic!
Now is where the real fun begins. Use the same bright soft pastel and draw another
layer of highlight . Make sure you stay in the borders of the blended tone from Step
3. Don’t forget to mark all the folds too– vertical and horizontal.
Tip: Satin and silk tend to form angular looking folds and creases. Avoid making
them look too soft and flowing while coloring. Keep that edge!
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 115
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 6: More blending
Gently blend what you have from the previous step and make sure the second layer
of light is clearly visible everywhere on the dress. Look at the chest area and each
and every fold you have. Again - you don’t want to cover more than ½ of the dress
with light.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 116
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Step 7: Shadows
Satin and silk are fabrics of huge contrast. They have soft, blended highlight areas
and solid, strong dark areas. Use a black soft pastel to mark the darkness in your
sketch. Fill close to the outlines, close to each and every fold and wherever your
artist’s sense tells you to. Get creative, have some fun!
Step 8: Real shadows
Blend gently the black soft pastel from the previous step. Make sure the
shadows don’t occupy the whole base color that you had left. Less is more in this
case.
After blending use a black color pencil and emphasize the areas that feel the most
deep and dark to you. Use the imaginary clay sculpture technique if you hesitate
where these places are. The more you “dig” in the sculpture the darker the shadow
gets.
Add a third layer of light. Smaller and brighter than the last ones, right in their
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 117
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
center.
Step 9: Finishing touches
By now you should have a pretty realistic looking drawing of silk/ satin fabric. It is
time to make some extra blending and it’s ready to go. Continue building up
highlights until they look soft, blended and brighter in the middle. Don’t lose the
edges of the folds while coloring. Blend until it’s perfect and then clean up your
sketch if it looks messy outside of the design outlines.
The center of the satin highlights is a much brighter and more saturated color
compared to the base. Here is a color chart that should help you with your colors
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 118
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
choise:
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 119
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
BASIC RENDERING OF ZEBRA PRINT
Step 1: The base
Create your fashion design. Since overcomplicated designs usually don’t go very
well with this print, try to keep the clothes clean and simple for now. If you are
drawing zebra print clothes you can make some realistic looking folds in the key
places.
Tip: The key places where folds are most visible are: the elbows, the wrist, the bust,
the waits (not always), the crotch area, the knees and if you are drawing pants - the
ankles area.
Step 2: Give it some shadows
Grab a grey color to make the garment realistic looking and mark the places where
there are some folds. You don’t need to be so perfect with this as the stripes will
cover the most of the blouse, but if you skip this step the design may look plain.
Although zebra print is usually drawn in black and white, there may be countless
color variations. No matter which color you chose for the background and the stripes,
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 120
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
always make sure you have marked with darker color the shadows.
Step 3: How to draw zebra stripes?
Start drawing the stripes that touch the outline of the blouse.
When drawing the cut stripes remember to vary their thickness and length . Leave
uneven spacing between them. Zebra stripes should look naturally spread; not too
organized.
When you are done- fill the shapes with black.
Step 4: Shape I
Fill some of the inner side with short stripes in the form shown below. Play with their
outline as much as you want as long as you keep the stripe parallel to all the rest.
Have a close look at how the illustration looks when a stripe happens to be over a
fold. It gets distorted: separated in two divergent segments.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 121
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Fill the new shapes.
Step 5: Shape II
The second type of stripes you can notice on the beautiful zebra pattern reminds a
fork with two spikes. Draw some shapes cut in half at the outline of the garment.
Those in the center part should be drawn whole.
Fill with black.
Step 6: Shape III
The last type of zebra stripes is similar to the first one, but it has a hole in the middle.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 122
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Play with the form of this shape and fill all the empty spaces left on your design.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 123
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
FDDI
Questionnaire:
Q. Design and illustrate a collection of Women’s performance apparel using at least
five different poses and different views. Sports such as cycling and running, which
requires body hugging silhouettes and athletic essence, will really test your ability to
draw the women’s figure. The garment designs should be quite simple with minimal
seaming, perhaps utilizing seamless knit technologies and colour blocking.
FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 124
[This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation
for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
Fashion Illustration Techniques and Proportions
Fashion Illustration Techniques and Proportions
Fashion Illustration Techniques and Proportions

More Related Content

What's hot

fashion illustration
 fashion illustration fashion illustration
fashion illustrationKirtiBana
 
The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64
The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64
The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64taller BIOarq
 
Fashion Design Portfolio
 Fashion Design Portfolio Fashion Design Portfolio
Fashion Design PortfolioVarsha Sekhani
 
Silhouettes by roy
Silhouettes by roySilhouettes by roy
Silhouettes by royHiranmoy Roy
 
Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)
Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)
Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)dezyneecole
 
U 4 cutting technology
U 4 cutting  technology U 4 cutting  technology
U 4 cutting technology kibrom G
 
Fundamentals of fashion
Fundamentals of fashionFundamentals of fashion
Fundamentals of fashioninwardi04
 
Fashion portfolio astha goyel
Fashion portfolio astha goyelFashion portfolio astha goyel
Fashion portfolio astha goyelAstha Goel
 
Fashion design process
Fashion design processFashion design process
Fashion design processsuniltalekar1
 

What's hot (20)

fashion illustration
 fashion illustration fashion illustration
fashion illustration
 
Yokes and Types
Yokes and TypesYokes and Types
Yokes and Types
 
The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64
The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64
The dressmaker-s-handbook-of-couture-sewing-techniques-gnv64
 
Fashion terminology
Fashion terminology Fashion terminology
Fashion terminology
 
Fashion Design Portfolio
 Fashion Design Portfolio Fashion Design Portfolio
Fashion Design Portfolio
 
Fashion draping
Fashion drapingFashion draping
Fashion draping
 
Fashion forecasting
Fashion forecasting Fashion forecasting
Fashion forecasting
 
Patternmaking
PatternmakingPatternmaking
Patternmaking
 
Embroidery
EmbroideryEmbroidery
Embroidery
 
Silhouettes by roy
Silhouettes by roySilhouettes by roy
Silhouettes by roy
 
Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)
Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)
Fashion Design student work (Dezyne E' cole College)
 
U 4 cutting technology
U 4 cutting  technology U 4 cutting  technology
U 4 cutting technology
 
applique work
applique workapplique work
applique work
 
Fashion cycle
Fashion cycleFashion cycle
Fashion cycle
 
Fundamentals of fashion
Fundamentals of fashionFundamentals of fashion
Fundamentals of fashion
 
Pattern magic-pdf
Pattern magic-pdfPattern magic-pdf
Pattern magic-pdf
 
F.o final jury
F.o final juryF.o final jury
F.o final jury
 
Fashion portfolio astha goyel
Fashion portfolio astha goyelFashion portfolio astha goyel
Fashion portfolio astha goyel
 
Fashion design process
Fashion design processFashion design process
Fashion design process
 
Fashion_Terms
Fashion_TermsFashion_Terms
Fashion_Terms
 

Similar to Fashion Illustration Techniques and Proportions

Documentation semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of Design
Documentation  semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of DesignDocumentation  semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of Design
Documentation semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of DesignSneha Sarang
 
The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on Visual Ar...
The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on  Visual Ar...The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on  Visual Ar...
The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on Visual Ar...amerakatz
 
How To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your Future
How To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your FutureHow To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your Future
How To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your FutureFahri Karakas
 
Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...
Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...
Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...Ajjay Kumar Gupta
 
Seminar 9 Asset creation and Designing Your Life - 10 May and 13 May 2021
Seminar 9   Asset creation and Designing Your Life -  10 May and 13 May 2021Seminar 9   Asset creation and Designing Your Life -  10 May and 13 May 2021
Seminar 9 Asset creation and Designing Your Life - 10 May and 13 May 2021Fahri Karakas
 
Cheap assignment help USA
Cheap assignment help USACheap assignment help USA
Cheap assignment help USANicole Valerio
 
Cgp grade 12 module 2-edited
Cgp grade 12 module 2-editedCgp grade 12 module 2-edited
Cgp grade 12 module 2-editedAllanPalmaGil2
 
Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development 2 oc...
Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development   2 oc...Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development   2 oc...
Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development 2 oc...Fahri Karakas
 
A Changing World and A Changing Job Market
A Changing World and A Changing Job MarketA Changing World and A Changing Job Market
A Changing World and A Changing Job MarketFahri Karakas
 
EED406 2014 E-tivity 3
EED406 2014 E-tivity 3EED406 2014 E-tivity 3
EED406 2014 E-tivity 3aayrton
 
Pattern making study material
Pattern making study materialPattern making study material
Pattern making study materialAehshan Srivastav
 
Seminar 8 job applications - 3 may and 6 may 2021
Seminar 8   job applications -  3 may and 6 may 2021Seminar 8   job applications -  3 may and 6 may 2021
Seminar 8 job applications - 3 may and 6 may 2021Fahri Karakas
 
Dushyant sehrawat b15 lap
Dushyant sehrawat b15 lapDushyant sehrawat b15 lap
Dushyant sehrawat b15 lapvasugupta101
 
Knowing Oneself
Knowing OneselfKnowing Oneself
Knowing OneselfKokoStevan
 
The Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach Online
The Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach OnlineThe Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach Online
The Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach OnlineWe Teach Fashion
 

Similar to Fashion Illustration Techniques and Proportions (20)

Basics Human figure drawing.pdf
Basics Human figure drawing.pdfBasics Human figure drawing.pdf
Basics Human figure drawing.pdf
 
craft cluster study material
 craft cluster study material  craft cluster study material
craft cluster study material
 
Documentation semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of Design
Documentation  semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of DesignDocumentation  semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of Design
Documentation semester 4, Photography Design, National Institute of Design
 
The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on Visual Ar...
The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on  Visual Ar...The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on  Visual Ar...
The Development Skills of Design in Line Element in Grid System on Visual Ar...
 
How To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your Future
How To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your FutureHow To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your Future
How To Prepare Your Career Portfolio for Your Future
 
Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...
Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...
Fashion Entrepreneurs, Garment Fabrication and Designing, Clothing Line Produ...
 
Seminar 9 Asset creation and Designing Your Life - 10 May and 13 May 2021
Seminar 9   Asset creation and Designing Your Life -  10 May and 13 May 2021Seminar 9   Asset creation and Designing Your Life -  10 May and 13 May 2021
Seminar 9 Asset creation and Designing Your Life - 10 May and 13 May 2021
 
Cheap assignment help USA
Cheap assignment help USACheap assignment help USA
Cheap assignment help USA
 
Cgp grade 12 module 2-edited
Cgp grade 12 module 2-editedCgp grade 12 module 2-edited
Cgp grade 12 module 2-edited
 
Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development 2 oc...
Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development   2 oc...Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development   2 oc...
Lectures 1 and 2 - Employability, Creativity, and Personal development 2 oc...
 
A Changing World and A Changing Job Market
A Changing World and A Changing Job MarketA Changing World and A Changing Job Market
A Changing World and A Changing Job Market
 
Business coaching models ch5 1
Business coaching models ch5 1Business coaching models ch5 1
Business coaching models ch5 1
 
EED406 2014 E-tivity 3
EED406 2014 E-tivity 3EED406 2014 E-tivity 3
EED406 2014 E-tivity 3
 
Pattern making study material
Pattern making study materialPattern making study material
Pattern making study material
 
Seminar 8 job applications - 3 may and 6 may 2021
Seminar 8   job applications -  3 may and 6 may 2021Seminar 8   job applications -  3 may and 6 may 2021
Seminar 8 job applications - 3 may and 6 may 2021
 
Dushyant sehrawat b15 lap
Dushyant sehrawat b15 lapDushyant sehrawat b15 lap
Dushyant sehrawat b15 lap
 
E book
E bookE book
E book
 
CGP Module-8 PDF
CGP Module-8 PDFCGP Module-8 PDF
CGP Module-8 PDF
 
Knowing Oneself
Knowing OneselfKnowing Oneself
Knowing Oneself
 
The Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach Online
The Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach OnlineThe Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach Online
The Four Types of Fashion Course to Teach Online
 

More from Aehshan Srivastav

More from Aehshan Srivastav (13)

master portfolio.pdf
master portfolio.pdfmaster portfolio.pdf
master portfolio.pdf
 
final portfolio
final portfoliofinal portfolio
final portfolio
 
visual merchandising portfolio
visual merchandising portfoliovisual merchandising portfolio
visual merchandising portfolio
 
Garment construction study material for designing student
Garment construction study material for designing studentGarment construction study material for designing student
Garment construction study material for designing student
 
Business communication
Business communication Business communication
Business communication
 
Fashion a merchandising
Fashion a merchandisingFashion a merchandising
Fashion a merchandising
 
Fashion retailing study material
Fashion retailing study materialFashion retailing study material
Fashion retailing study material
 
Accessory design studymaterial
Accessory design studymaterialAccessory design studymaterial
Accessory design studymaterial
 
Marketingmix 1
Marketingmix 1Marketingmix 1
Marketingmix 1
 
Reserch work on Madhubani painting
 Reserch work on Madhubani painting Reserch work on Madhubani painting
Reserch work on Madhubani painting
 
DESIGNING PORTFOLIO
DESIGNING PORTFOLIODESIGNING PORTFOLIO
DESIGNING PORTFOLIO
 
VISUAL MERCHANDISING
VISUAL MERCHANDISINGVISUAL MERCHANDISING
VISUAL MERCHANDISING
 
Free delhi-metro-map www.delhi-metro-map.com-
Free delhi-metro-map www.delhi-metro-map.com-Free delhi-metro-map www.delhi-metro-map.com-
Free delhi-metro-map www.delhi-metro-map.com-
 

Recently uploaded

Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...EduSkills OECD
 
Paul Dobryden In Media Res Media Component
Paul Dobryden In Media Res Media ComponentPaul Dobryden In Media Res Media Component
Paul Dobryden In Media Res Media ComponentInMediaRes1
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
Scientific  Writing :Research  DiscourseScientific  Writing :Research  Discourse
Scientific Writing :Research DiscourseAnita GoswamiGiri
 
BBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptx
BBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptxBBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptx
BBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptxProf. Kanchan Kumari
 
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptxUmeshTimilsina1
 
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroomSamsung Business USA
 
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptxCLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptxAnupam32727
 
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptxmary850239
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...
Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...
Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...DrVipulVKapoor
 
4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx
4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx
4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptxmary850239
 
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristicsShark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristicsArubSultan
 
Unit :1 Basics of Professional Intelligence
Unit :1 Basics of Professional IntelligenceUnit :1 Basics of Professional Intelligence
Unit :1 Basics of Professional IntelligenceDr Vijay Vishwakarma
 
Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...
Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...
Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...Osopher
 
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17Celine George
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
 
Paul Dobryden In Media Res Media Component
Paul Dobryden In Media Res Media ComponentPaul Dobryden In Media Res Media Component
Paul Dobryden In Media Res Media Component
 
Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design" - Introduction to Machine Learning"
Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design" - Introduction to Machine Learning"Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design" - Introduction to Machine Learning"
Mattingly "AI & Prompt Design" - Introduction to Machine Learning"
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC ...
 
Plagiarism,forms,understand about plagiarism,avoid plagiarism,key significanc...
Plagiarism,forms,understand about plagiarism,avoid plagiarism,key significanc...Plagiarism,forms,understand about plagiarism,avoid plagiarism,key significanc...
Plagiarism,forms,understand about plagiarism,avoid plagiarism,key significanc...
 
Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
Scientific  Writing :Research  DiscourseScientific  Writing :Research  Discourse
Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
 
BBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptx
BBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptxBBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptx
BBA 205 UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL POLICY dr kanchan.pptx
 
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
 
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
 
Introduction to Research ,Need for research, Need for design of Experiments, ...
Introduction to Research ,Need for research, Need for design of Experiments, ...Introduction to Research ,Need for research, Need for design of Experiments, ...
Introduction to Research ,Need for research, Need for design of Experiments, ...
 
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptxCLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
 
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KĨ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 11 (CẢ NĂM) - FRIENDS GLOBAL - NĂM HỌC...
 
Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...
Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...
Geoffrey Chaucer Works II UGC NET JRF TGT PGT MA PHD Entrance Exam II History...
 
4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx
4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx
4.9.24 Social Capital and Social Exclusion.pptx
 
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristicsShark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
 
Unit :1 Basics of Professional Intelligence
Unit :1 Basics of Professional IntelligenceUnit :1 Basics of Professional Intelligence
Unit :1 Basics of Professional Intelligence
 
Israel Genealogy Research Assoc. April 2024 Database Release
Israel Genealogy Research Assoc. April 2024 Database ReleaseIsrael Genealogy Research Assoc. April 2024 Database Release
Israel Genealogy Research Assoc. April 2024 Database Release
 
Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...
Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...
Healthy Minds, Flourishing Lives: A Philosophical Approach to Mental Health a...
 
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
 

Fashion Illustration Techniques and Proportions

  • 1.
  • 2. Ministry of Commerce & Industries, Govt. of India Fashion Illustration-II School of Fashion Design Course- B. Des. (Fashion Design) Course Code- B. Des. (FD) Student Learning Booklet (SLB) SLB Sr. No:- _____ Of _____ FDDI Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Government of India, A-10/A, Sector- 24, Noida-201301. Subject Head Fashion Illustration II Subject Code BFD 401 Controlled
  • 3. Acknowledgement `Asato ma sadgamaya, Tamaso ma jyotirgamaya, Mrtyormaamrtamgamaya’ `Lead me from the asat(lie) to the sat (truth), Lead me from darkness to light, Lead me from death to immortality.’ Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge and arts, represents the free flow of wisdom and consciousness. My first acknowledgement is to her blessings. To attain excellence, it is important that knowledge sharing shall be carried out with best possible methodology so that quest for knowledge can be achieved. This is the biggest challenge to the human society and to the institution in particular as they are the torch bearer for disseminating the knowledge. Project `Saraswati’ has been envisaged with the dream of attaining excellence in delivery of training by employing best practices in the field of knowledge sharing. FDDI as an institution has been pioneer in development of ‘Swayam Siddha’ self- paced knowledge& skill set based learning materials for the footwear, fashion and retail sector. This manual represents an extended and thoroughly revised version of notes on Fashion Design which are collected from books, journals, internet, and other standard publications. These manual are primary source of learning and still relevant for delivery of the training. Project Saraswati is the next logical step in the augmentation of the knowledge domain. It focuses on standardization of learning material, training delivery, assessment system and validation system so that knowledge reaches with same light and equal opportunity of learning is available to all. FDDI firmly believe that for the attainment of goal, team work is an essential part, while preparing this manuscript there are many individuals whose names may not appear on this page but their contribution had been immense as far as development of this learning material is concerned. The management of FDDI acknowledges contribution of each and every person involved in the shaping and preparation of this manual. This entire learning material was reviewed and conformity to the requirement of the syllabus including deliberation. The training material design guidelines and deliberation were carried out by Fashion Design Department. FDDI is also grateful to Mr. V. B. Parvatikar, Advisor (Technical)who has been instrumental in providing resources and guidance in proactive manner &for providing critical inputs at the time when it was needed the most. FDDI also acknowledge other team members notably Mr. Ashish Kumar (Manager, RCIP) and Mr. Sanjay Kamlay for documentation control and management activity. FDDI hope that this document will help immensely to the students and teachers alike in understanding of the subject in more comprehensive and objective way. It is the reader who provides us the inputs for further improvement. The management of FDDI welcomes all the suggestions to further improve this learning material. Rajeev J.Lakhara I [Controlled]
  • 4. Instruction Sheet • This learning guide is developed to provide you the necessary information regarding the content specified in the index. • This guide will also assist you to attain the learning outcome stated in the cover page. Specifically upon the completion of this learning guide, you will be able to : - Seek clarification. - Understanding and execution of the concept. - Improvise technical skills, based on the practical subject. 1. Read the specific objective of this learning guide. Guidelines: 2. Read the detailed information given in the units. 3. Accomplish the self-check given twice (one in the middle, the other at the end) in the complete learning handbook. 4. If you have earned a satisfactory result in self evaluation, then proceed further. However if your rating is unsatisfactory, see your teacher for guidance. 5. Submit your accomplished self-check. This will form part of your training portfolio.
  • 5. INDEX TOPICS 1. Proportion of the croquie (female, male and kids) 2. Basic figure drawing. 3. Different types of views (front, three- fourth and profile) 4. Drawing of arms, hands, legs, faces, hairstyles. 5. Photo analysis. 6. Specification drawing of fashion garments and its details. (Flat sketches) 7. Development of designs and costumes. 8. Fabric rendering. [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 6. Fashion Illustrations The key to great illustrations for fashion design lies in a good knowledge of the human physique and the mastery of various drawing techniques. The observation and study of the human body is vital to every fashion designer, the delicate curves and structures are the origin of all apparel and the perfect setting and surroundings to present them. Traditionally illustrations were made with pencil, ink and watercolours. Today markers and pens can do the trick as well and of course adobe Photoshop. It all starts with Skeletons, if you understand how the human body is constructed the rest will be a walk in the park and you can illustrate all sorts of poses, stands and materials. Fashion sketching class will be all about experimentation and refining your drawing abilities, your knowledge of basic figures and fashion stands will be put to a test. The grey pencil sketches will come live. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 1 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 7. Skeletons The human body is literally a big mass of water and protein hanging in and around a calcium frame. This frame is the skeleton, made out of many different bones. These bones are the key to drawing the human figure, they are simple to move around and manipulate. We start every pose with a rough sketch of the skeleton; it will reduce the risk to draw too big for the paper and at the same time keep the overall figure in the right proportions before we start the more elaborate drawing of details and clothes etc. The image below shows how we construct a simple and rough sketch of the skeletal pose and then add body mass and 'muscles' to get the final pose. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 2 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 8. The Female Figure The classic stand is a figure with relaxed and loose hanging arms and straight legs, fully frontal. A fashion figurine is an over stretched idea of a normal figure, just like catwalk models are quite far from having a normal figure. Sometimes the human body proportions are split down and counted in 'heads' as the smallest unit. A normal Person would be his or her head around 8 ½ times in height where as a fashion figure could be up to 9 –10 units. If you closely study real fashion models on international catwalks, In this example shoulder width and hips have the same width. If the shoulders are wider the figure will look more masculine, where as wider hips imply more femininity. Elbows and waist are on the same level. Wrists are roughly a bit lower than the crotch and the hands therefore even lower. For women the lower legs are generally longer than the upper leg portion (thighs). FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 3 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 9. DRAWING THE FASHION FIGURE AS discussed previously in the section on line quality in Getting Started, learning to draw the figure is very much like learning to write. In the beginning, you worked on lined paper, used guide lines for directions, and followed the exact rules of penmanship. The letters soon turned into words, the wads into sentences, and the sentences into thoughts. After you were really confident with this process, you were able to concentrate on the content, rather than on how the letters were being written. Learning how to draw the fashion figure is a similar process. It is the way you will be able put your ideas on paper and show the finished product of your designs. Keep in mind that a body is not an exact measurement, and as we have learned in previous chapters, there are many factors that keep changing the fashion figure from one period to another. The figure we will study is often referred to as croquis figure. A croquis a working sketch. It is also a basic fashion body on which clothing can be designed, flats can be worked, or it can be the take-off point for more finished art. Following chapters will concentrate more on such specifics as balance, center front, hands, faces. In this "chapter, we will study the factual breakdown of the fashion figure. This is the "working with lined paper" stage of figure drawing and analysis. After thoroughly understanding these principles, you will begin to slowly work your way into a simple blocking off and gestural approach to drawing the fashion figure. The ultimate goal is to understand the concept of the figure breakdown. Time and practice will give you the successful results. Remember—everyone has their own personal growth rate and no one follows a robot-like order. There will always be one part of the fashion drawing that is easier than another. For some, the face will be easy, for others, the torso, and yet others will find rendering to be simple. The Fashion Figure In the beginning, there are certain rules of proportion with which you must become familiar. The figure is measured in "heads," with each head representing one inch. These heads will be used to indicate and place the different parts of the fashion figure. After some practice, all the "heads" will suddenly become a figure and after a while you will be drawing! FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 4 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 10. Blocking of a basic croqui figure We will begin by studying the breakdown of the 10-head fashion figure, first, draw a line down the paper and divide it into 10 one-inch sections. Label each line, beginning at the top with 0 and ending at the bottom with 10. The first section will contain the head, with the chin resting at the 1-inch line. • 1 ½ “ is the shoulder line. • 2 ¼ " is the apex for high point) of the bustline. • 3 ¼ “ is the waistline. • 3 ½” is the high hip or hip bone. • 4" is the fullest part of the hip. • 4 ½ “ is the lowest part of the hip or the crotch. (This measurement is approximately the middle of the fashion figure.) • 6 ½ “ is the knee. • 9 ¼ “ is the ankle. • 10 is the toe. Now let's determine widths. Use the head—laid on its side— to measure the widths. This will give us a guideline on how wide parts of the figure will be. • The shoulders are approximately 1 ½ - to 1 ¾ heads wide. Any particular fashion style may vary this measurement. • The waist is approximately ¾ heads wide. The hips are approximately 1 ¼ heads wide. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 5 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 11. Now that you are aware of the sections and what they represent, you can start to block off the figure; 1. Draw an oval in the first section. The neck will touch the shoulder line at first, but then you will have to draw the trapezius muscles. To do this, place a shallow triangle between the chin and the shoulder, the top is 'h inch under the chin and touches the end • the shoulder. 2. To form the torso, bring a line down from the end of the shoulder to the waistline (3'A'). To indicate the hips, draw a line from the waistline to the fullest part of the hip (4"). 3. For the legs, draw slightly tapering straight lines from the hip to line 10. For the leg division, darken e center front line from line 10 to the crotch 4 ½ FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 6 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 12. 4. To indicate the feet, draw a triangle on the outside of the legs. The triangle should extend from line 10 to approximately 9 ¼ , which is the ankle. 5. At the waistline and crotch, draw slightly curved lines. These lines will help in the placement of the elbow and wrist. Starting at the apex of the bust line, (2 ¼ ) draw the arms with slightly tapering lines to the crotch (4 ½ ). 6. Block in the hands with rectangles and triangles You now have a basic, blocked off fashion figure FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 7 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 13. 7. To round it out. place this figure under a tracing or photocopy paper and refine the oval head. Smooth the line from the neck over the triangle. This will form the trapezius muscle and the neck flow into the shoulders. Next, round tips of the shoulders. Round out the line for armpit—through the breasts—to the waist. Now, slightly round the line from the waist high hip and then round out the hip area. Now slightly round the lines from the crotch to Straighten the inside of the foot, and then, forearms, draw two slightly tapered lines from the shoulder to the wrist. Last, blend the rectangles triangles used for the hands. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 8 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 14. The Style Lines The style lines on the croquis figure should correspond the style lines on the dress form. They are extremely important in both drawing and designing clothes. To duplicate the style lines of a dress form. You have an example of the style lines going through the basic women croqui. You now have the style lines of the dress form. It will be of great value to you, not only in drawing what you design, but in accurate placement of the fashion details. Now that you have learned the "alphabet" and the "penmanship" of the fashion figure, with time and practice, you will be able to begin to develop the "content." Your ultimate goal should be a relaxed, flowing, and luxurious figure. It should never look overworked— regardless of how much time it takes to draw. The garment and pose should be in perfect harmony with each Other, arid it should, above all, have your own vision and point of view. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 9 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 15. The Balance Line To achieve a figure that will be "standing" and not falling over—you must understand the "balance" line. The balance line is the imaginary straight line that drops from the pit of the neck to the around. It never bends or goes more to one side or the other—it is always absolutely straight. As an exercise, analyze the balance lines in photographs from fashion magazines or catalogs. Gather clear photos of models in simple poses and stay away from highly distorted or exaggerated poses, with a marker, indicate the balance lines in color. Indicate the high hips and supporting legs with another color. When the figure is standing with equal weight on both legs —either opened or closed—you will notice that the hips straighten out and the balance line falls between the legs. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 10 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 16. When the figure puts more weight on one hip than the other, the high hip supports the leg that balances the figure. This supporting leg begins at the high hip and angles down to touch the balance line. The supporting leg is always at an angle—it is never straight, some part of the foot should touch the balance line. If you place the weight all on one hip, you will notice that the -supporting leg is angled. Try to move it and your drawing will surely begin to topple. You can, however, move the no supporting leg in many different positions, and the balance will not be affected. The non supporting leg is completely moveable and has nothing to do with the balance of the figure. It gives the pose an attitude. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 11 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 17. In some photographs you will notice that line is slightly off. Remember that when posing in front of a camera, often she might not have settled her weight when was taken. Also, in some walking poses- runway shots—the supporting leg might be on the low hip. However, these are exception mind that each individual pose may have special rule. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 12 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 18. Center Front and Garment Details When you draw a garment detail, for example a neckline, remember to: • First, draw from the outside to the center. • Then, draw from the center to the outside. • Make sure that the line is shorter on the side away from you and is longer on the side near you. • Check to see that the center front seams take an upward curve. The back view has the same principles as the front, except the horizontal seams take a downward curve. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 13 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 19. To apply the principle of center front when drawing clothing, let's look at buttons and closings. In a single-breasted garment, the buttons are placed down the middle of the body, or center front, the closing goes to the side of the center front. The only times buttons align with center front are in: 1. Button and loop closings 2. Zippers 3. Cardigan jackets 4. Frog and toggle closings Our drawing can be a shirt, a coat, or a jacket. It can have one button to a dozen. This rule never changes. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 14 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 20. In a double breasted garment the buttons are an equal distance from the center front, regardless of how close or far apart they are. There are double- breasted garments—for example, a blazer—where there are two equal distances between the buttons. Today, closings can be designed with many different options, but the buttons should always relate to the center front. Additionally, the double breasted rules also apply to side closings — except the nonworking buttons are left off. As the figure in a double-breasted garment turns and you sense the perspective of the body, notice that the shape of the buttons on the near side are circular and the shape of the buttons on the far side are oval. In a near-profile view of the single or double garment, the buttons are placed on the out. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 15 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 21. Gestures Movement or Action Lines Ultimately, we want our fashion figure to have a wonderful flow and movement. A fashion figure would look as if she danced onto the page—as if there is no effort at all in her gestures. In this chapter we will study the movement or gesture lines, which help to determine both the movement and the pose of figure. Remember, to make a fashion drawing which requires a lot of effort, knowledge, and practice. To help you understand the movement of lines of a figure, open up a fashion magazine to draw flowing lines over fashion photography what you think the direction or gesture of the lines might be. What will happen is that you will abstractly register how the figure could move. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 16 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 22. Since your eyes begin to sense a certain flow, you can begin to get more specific and analyze the movements. Depending on the sense, the figure may seem: Next, duplicate these movements on paper by using your finger as a drawing tool. Let your fingers sense the gesture, movement, and action. Now, with a pencil or marker duplicate these gestures on paper. Don't even think about accuracy. This is simply an exercise and you can throw the end results away. When you begin to feel confident with this exercise, start to actually draw the gestures on paper. Start to actually draw the gestures on paper. Start with you first reaction and keep drawing over the previous lines almost as if you were building up the figure's gestures from scratch. Start observing the relationship of one body part to another. Aim for more and more accuracy. The following four sections are short studies of different types of figures in various gestures or movements. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 17 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 23. The “S” Curve This is one of the most fashionable gestures or poses. It is also a very important movement- the crunch and stretch. From the front view, to have a pronounced high hip movement. The line from head to the high hip, and from the hip to the resting foot will form an "S" curve Notice how the side of the figure with the high hip slightly crunches between the breasts and hips and stretches on the opposite side. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 18 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 24. The Male Figure The construction of a male body varies only slightly from that of a female. The main characteristics are:  Broader shoulders and smaller hips  Almost absent waist  Upper and lower leg almost same length. The general appearance of a male body is sharper and more chiselled due to less body fat and more muscles. The 8 or 8 1/2 head idea remains and if we want to achieve a more masculine look we can play with the -V- shape of the body, meaning broader shoulders and smaller hips so it optically looks like the letter V. Also accentuating muscles will make it more masculine. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 19 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 25. MEN’s basic Figure Template Place a sheet of tracing paper over your template and drop a red vertical line through the center of the measured spaces to establish a "plumb" or Balance Line. Working with a #2 or HB pencil, draw an oval for the head and then work your way down the body indicating the geometric forms for the men's fashion figure. 1. Once you have established the forms, roughly block in the shoulders, chest, and abdomen on a second tracing overlay. Remember that a masculine fashion physique is not necessarily bulky. 2. Loosely sketch the rest of the figure. 3. Refine your drawing to include details for the face, hands, and feet. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 20 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 26. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 21 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 27. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 22 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 28. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 23 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.] Men's Back Figure
  • 29. Male Proportions 1 There is no set rule for proportions in fashion illustration. For certain kinds of clothes and/or age groups, you may want to veer danger- ously close to reality; for others, you may want to exaggerate outra- geously. But these charts give you some basis for comparison, and a 2 starting point when you are developing your first figures. Male Figure Checklist 1. Most beginners Basic Male make guy torsos 3 too short, and this does not flatter most garments. 2. Long legs look good on males, 4 but for a younger, street look the legs should be kept in check. 3. Any figure propor- 5 tion change will also affect the gar- ment proportion, unless you are just doing Speedos. 4. A too-small head 6 proportion makes him a “pinhead”— not a good look. 5. Hands and feet need to be large 7 enough to look masculine. The hand is the size of the face, the side view foot is the size of the head. 8 6. As you do with females, add the most leg length from the knee down. 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Proportion Chart 10 This figure has a little less torso (four and one-third heads) and a little more leg (five and one-third heads.) This torso is four and one-half heads. The legs are about five heads. Note: As we will see in later chapters, younger guys will be closer to nine heads and elegant fashion guys may be more like ten. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 24 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 30. The Torso Much of the beautiful movement in fashion poses is created by the opposition of the two key structural elements in the torso, the rib cage and the pelvis. You can see in our exam- HS ple figure the high shoulder (HS) and the high hip (HH), which reflect the opposing tilt of these two dominant forms. But the flexibility of the torso comes from the spine, and the forward position of the neck is dictated by the shape of the seven cervical vertebrae (A). The curve of the back and hip demonstrate the shape of the thoracic (B) and lumbar vertebrae (C), as well as the sacrum and coccyx (D). The front view of the torso is shaped by the ribcage and the pelvis, as well as the muscula- ture that is supported by the bones. Some bones or parts of bones are just beneath the skin, and their shapes are visible on the surface of the body. (See Skeletal Landmarks, below.) The more muscular development a physique HH is subjected to, the more the muscle definition will stand out. In contrast, a very young or thin physique can be quite shapeless. SKELETAL LANDMARKS Brow Ridge Plane of Sternum Clavicle A Seventh Cervical Vertebrae Profile of Scapula The Spine As you can see, the spine has an S curve built into its shape. And because it is flex- ible, we can stretch and compress in all directions. Our torso can move forward, back, and sideways whenever we want. Keep the shape of the spine in mind at all times, and be able to locate it in Profile of B Rib Cage Rib Indications Elbow any pose. This is especially important for the angle of the neck. I often see the neck angled incorrectly, which makes figures look stiff and uncomfortable. Hipbone Radius and Ulna Metacarpal BONES OF THE SPINE C (A). Seven cervical vertebrae; (B). twelve thoracic vertebrae; (C). five lumbar vertebrae; (D). sacrum and coccyx. D Note: The neck always slants forward from the curve of the back. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 25 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 31. BONES AND MUSCLES OF THE TORSO The humerus connects into the scapula. The scapula and the clavicle connect here. The clavicle and the scapula move in an arc, along with the upper arm. Clavicle Sternomastoid Trapezius Deltoid Pectoralis Scapula Serratus Rectus Abdominus Humerus External Obliques Rectus Abdominus The bones and muscles of the body make a wonderful part- nership that keeps us upright and moving with incredible endurance. (We can outlast almost any animal over a long distance.) The muscle groups of the front torso are fairly sim- ple. The trapezius wraps from the back and attaches into the clavicle, as does the deltoid. The pectoralis also comes out of the clavicle and the sternum. The front plane is formed by the rectus ab- dominus; the side plane by the serratus, obliques, and gluteus medius. MAJOR MUSCLE GROUPS Gluteus Medius Anatomy may or may not be your thing, but having a working understanding of these key elements can really inform your work and allow you to progress to a different level. Front View Torso Gender Differences As you can see by examples A and B, the male torso is much longer and less curved than the female torso. The shoulders are wider, the waist is less defined, and the hips are nar- rower. Example B shows the simple geometric forms of the two different torsos. Keeping these shapes in mind will be very helpful when you create A figures. Male Female B FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 26 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 32. Medi Glute Maxi SCAPULA Trapezius Deltoid Latissimus Dorsi External Obliques Gluteus us us mus Curve of the Spine Planes of the Male, Back View Structure of the Back Understanding the planes and muscles of the back, along with the skeletal land- marks, is especially helpful when rendering your figures. The male back is a broad expanse and is hard to define without the anatomical subtleties to help. Overrendering does not work either. We want to understand where things are but not be distracted by the details. Any three-quarter back must reflect the curve of the spine. The trapezius, latissimus dorsi (Lats), and gluteus maximus are the primary muscle groups, and the deltoid wraps around and connects into the scapula. The trapezius also connects into the upper rim of the scapula. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 27 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 33. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 28 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 34. DRAWING LITTLE GIRLS As growth in the limbs accelerates, the head now constitutes one-fifth of the total height. First determine the measurements for your little girl's proportion template (use the information provided above right).Then modifies the infant's geometric forms for an elongated figure. This will lay the groundwork for your preliminary sketch of the little girl. Once you refine the drawing you can move on to other views and variations of the figure. Little girls have developed surer footing, so poses can become more ambitious, reflecting greater activity. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 29 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 35. Drawing Little Boys Although there are small gender differences (the boy will have a slightly longer torso) you can use the same general figure proportion for both little girls and boys. You can use the same measurements as for your little girl's proportion template. Then block in the geometric forms as groundwork for your preliminary sketch. Although the little boy's figure has begun to mature and elongate, the belly is still quite round—especially when seen in profile. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 30 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 36. PHOTO ANALYSIS As an exercise, try taking a simple realistic pose from a magazine. If you like, it can be a runway pose. Put a piece of tracing paper over, the photograph and analyze what the figure is doing. Look for: • Balance • Center front • Shoulders, waist, and hip movement • Supporting leg • Non supporting leg • Arm Next, go through fashion magazines and analyze the movements in the photographs directly with a magic marker. Always choose photographs that seem as though the model is directly in front of you, taking a natural pose. Avoid extreme, trendy, or artsy poses that have distorted positions or proportions. Also, don't use photos in which the photographer has created a highly personal mood. Remember, you want to create the mood. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 31 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 37. Model Drawing Poses These are full front poses also described as high hip or low shoulder poses due to the model’s stance. Each of the four poses presents another form of figure analysis to help you apply these drawing techniques to your sketching process. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 32 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 38. BALANCE LINE This is the same type of balance line/ figure posing support. A balance line drops from the pit of the neck, down through the pose, stopping at the feet, on the floor of your page, it keeps the pose standing up, not tipping over (of balance). FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 33 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 39. This pose can be used as guidelines, structure to pin your figure sketching on, or visual r to work with as you build the figure. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 34 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 40. THE FACE The Soul of every sketch FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 35 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 41. The Female Face The female face is loosely speaking a more oval shape, with smooth and round lines, giving a soft and aesthetic impression. Full lips and eyes with lashes make it feminine. The nose can be smaller and if the cheekbones are accentuated we can add some fierceness. The female eyebrows are usually a good bit higher up than the male eyebrows, this opens and enlarges the whole eye area, and the 50% rules still apply. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 36 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 42. Eye positions Depending on how the eyes are placed, the overall feeling of the face can be altered. In general low set eyes give a cute and child like appearance where as high set eyes suggest maturity and adulthood. The base position is in the exact middle following the 50% rules. NORMAL EYE POSITION High set Eyes – Adult Face Low set Eyes- Baby Face FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 37 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 43. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 38 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 44. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 39 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 45. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 40 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 46. The Male Face Faces can be easily constructed using a 50 percent rule. The eyes are exactly in the middle of the vertical the nose bridge in the middle of the horizontal guide of the face. The nostrils mark the middle of the lower half of the face and the mouth marks the middle of the lowest quarter of the face. The male face is generally speaking a rather square than round set up with an accentuated jaw line and a wide chin. The eyebrows are low set and visible Adams apple can be sketched to make the appearance even more masculine. Eyes and lips shouldn't be too strong in order to avoid a makeup effect. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 41 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 47. Creating a front view Template First as for the women's head, the front view is a good place to start. Approximate the same vertical landmarks and widths for adult features as indicated. Use shadows and highlights to accentuate a more chiselled bone structure and prominent features. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 42 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 48. Creating a Three- quarter view template As noted in turning the women's head, vertical placement of the features will remain constant rotation. The Center Front line will turn with the head; the two halves of the face will no longer be equal in appearance as the side of the face turning from view becomes foreshortened. The Center Front line, which appeared straight in the front view, becomes curved for the three-quarter view. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 43 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 49. Creating a profile view template Similar to the women’s profile you will require a square as a starting point. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 44 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 50. Drawing Children's Heads The design and illustration of kids' clothing tends to be more imaginative and whimsical and so when it comes to drawing children's faces you will want to take similar creative license. Overly realistic drawing tends to age the appearance of children's faces. As well as being stylized, your illustrations should also convey attitude. A consistent drawing style must be adapted for the different age groups. As noted during infancy the head is extremely large in relation to the body. The ratio of head to body size changes as the baby matures. For example, an infant's head is one-quarter of its total body height; by age five or six, the head equals one-sixth of the height. You are under no obligation to precisely duplicate this ratio. But no matter what head-to-body ratio you choose, there should be a relative proportion between the age groups. The face must reflect other developmental changes, too. Children's faces not only grow larger but also longer over time. The bridge of the nose, which is barely visible in infancy, becomes more defined. Faces become increasingly distinguished by gender. Boys' heads take on a more rectangular appearance as the jaw becomes A Relative proportion of adults 'and little Stylization must be brought consistently across all age groups. A relative proportion of adults and little kid’s head. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 45 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 51. Different angles With a little bit of practice and a good eye you can try to manipulate the position of the head. Turn it a bit to the left or right, show it in full profile, tilt it up or turn it down. The skull illustrations taken from an old Thai sketching handbook, a couple of pages earlier can give you an idea of how the eyes and nose and mouth positions will change and the shape of the head looks like. Especially when working with a live model we can closely study their faces from various points of view. The shadows that the facial features cast are essential to accentuate different angles. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 46 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 52. Shadow Play FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 47 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 53. Eyes & lips Eyes can have various shapes and forms. Cat like, round, almond shaped, with or without a crease. The arch of the eyebrow usually corresponds to the outer edge of the Iris. A simple rule is that the distance between the two Eyes shall be as wide as one eye. The mouth about the same size or slightly bigger. Look at the lines on the right and how the facial features are arranged and correspond to each other. This is not a random occurrence but based upon principles that determine the beauty of a face. As many other things the beauty lays in proportions and evenness. Take a look at the various sketches of eyes and lips and you will see how just little variations change the look. Especially for the lips. For masculine faces we try to keep the lines simple and light where as for feminine face we can accentuate them. Especially the eyeliner. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 48 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 54. Facial expressions FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 49 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 55. Faces can have a million different shapes and expressions, whatever expression you choose will directly affect the mood of your sketch. The easiest way to change the mood is by changing the eyes and lips, happiness, sadness, anger, an easy exercise. The face plays an important role for your designs. The whole head is the soul of every sketch. Hair-style, shape and expression send out a message that can reinforce your ideas or do the contrary. As you can see drawing hair doesn't need hundreds of lines, each for every hair. The general shape and some lines to indicate strands are perfectly fine. Think of the hairstyle thing of the details, do they work with your clothes and the general idea of your inspiration? FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 50 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 56. FDDI Questionnaire: Q. Draw the various degrees of rotation of a men’s and women’s head. Maintaining the same likeness viewed at different degrees of rotation. Q. Analyze the photograph given below and sketch a stick and a flesh figure of the same. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 51 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 57. SELF CHECK (ANSWERS) FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 52 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 58. SELF CHECK (ANSWERS) FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 53 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 59. Hands FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 54 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 60. Drawing Women’s Hand In order to understand the three-dimensional volume, first analyze the hand in terms of simple geometric forms. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 55 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 61. Hands a masterful skill but better some simple lines than finger less stumps. Give it a try and you will find that it's not so hard in the end. You can see an extract from the same vintage Thai sketching handbook, with beautiful illustrations of various hand positions. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 56 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 62. Drawing Men's Hands Men's hands are squarer in appearance, with knuckles and bony structures having greater prominence. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 57 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 63. Drawing Children’s Hands Infant's and children's hands must also be highly stylized for fashion drawing. As children grows, the size, proportion, and structure of their hands changes. Babies and younger kids have short, round fingers and chubby knuckles which slim and elongate with maturity. By the time a child reaches seven, the shape of the hand is quite similar to that of an adult, only smaller. The younger the child, the shorter and rounder the fingers. A child's hand gestures reflect a specific level of dexterity depending on their age FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 58 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 64. LEGS Legs are not just straight lines with feet attached, due to the intricate play of muscles and bones under the skin; we can make out a distinctive shape. Well sketched legs are a sign of sophistication and can improve any fashion sketch. Legs should be long and slender with a sculptured knee and a faint idea of muscle, especially around the calf region in the lower part. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 59 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 65. Drawing Feet As with other parts of the body, it will be helpful to imagine a geometric shape—a wedge—as the starting point for drawing the foot. The relative proportion of this wedge compared to the total body height will be key. When first beginning, there is a tendency to draw very small feet. As with other parts of the body, you must have a working knowledge of the movement of the foot and leg. For example, when the heel is flat on the ground, the foot and leg come together at a right angle. As the heel elevates, this angle is expanded and, when viewed from the front, more of the instep becomes visible and the ankle is raised. Conversely, when the foot is flat, there is a foreshortening of the instep in the front view and a lowering of the ankle. The right and left foot are seldom seen in the same position or from the same point of view. For example, the right foot may be seen head-on (front view), while the left is partially or fully turned. The leg and foot positions in your fashion drawing should seem natural, corresponding to the rotation of the rest of the body. The way in which you stylize the foot should also have a relationship with the rest of your drawing. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 60 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 66. Drawing the Side View Foot The inside and outside edges of the foot are anatomically different, so you must first decide which foot (right or left) you are drawing and from what point of view While the outside edge of the foot makes full contact with the floor, the inside edge has a slight elevation in the center where the arch forms a bridge between the ball and heel. Turning the foot affects the order in which you see the toes. For the interior side view, the big toe is seen first and largely obscures the other four toes. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 61 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 67. Drawing Men's and Children's Feet Advice for drawing men's and children's hands will carry over to the feet. The men's foot will be less delicate and squarer. For infants and children, the relationship between the feet and the body as a whole will change as the child matures. Babies and little kids have relatively large and chubby feet. Since very young infants are unable to walk, they are usually drawn in sitting or crawling positions, and the bottoms of their feet are often in view. For bigger kids, the foot begins to thin and is smaller in relation to the body as a whole. Shoe styles also become more sophisticated as the child moves toward adulthood. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 62 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 68. Shoes FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 63 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 69. Flat Sketching Basic Garment Details and Silhouettes As a preliminary step toward drawing the clothed high hip figure, you will first identify and draw some basic garments as flats (technical drawings). Working with the static flats figure, will give you the opportunity to observe the most basic construction details and silhouettes without the complications that result from body movement and foreshortening. Flat Sketching a Basic Shirt For this exercise you will use a flats figure as a guide to maintain a relative proportion. Begin by folding a half inch (1.5cm) flap from the topmost edge of a sheet of tracing paper. Position this flap over the top edge of your flats figure, securing it with masking tape on the back. If possible, work from a sample garment and begin your flat sketch: NOTE: The Shirt front extension (where two front sides of a shirt overlap) is gender-specific; closing proper right over left for women, and left over right for men. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 64 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 70. There are many ways to finish a flats presentation: • Inking the flats by hand using felt tip markers is a traditional method and a good technique to master for the times when you do not have access to a computer. Technical drawing tool such as circle and ellipse templates, French curves, and rulers can be combined with freehand drawing as appropriate for the different garment details (for example, drapery is best drawn freehand, structural details such as plackets with a ruler). Be sure to use a variety of stroke weights—reserving the heaviest for the outside edge, with progressively lighter stroke weights for seams and topstitching. • When you are pressed for time, scan the pencil flat, clean it up in Photoshop, and export to Illustrator for a Live Trace. This preserves the spontaneity of the preliminary sketch, while converting the pencil sketch to a more finished "inked" drawing. • Depending on your computer skills, you can also translate a scan of your pencil sketch in Illustrator using the various mechanical and freehand drawing tools—again as they relate to the different garment details. If you intend to render your flat, you must create closed paths that can be easily filled with pattern and color. Also, take care to create separate paths for the outside edges and construction details so that you can manipulate the hierarchy of stroke Weights. This can be quite time consuming, but the end result will be "resolution independent"—meaning that the line will remain crisp no matter how much you reduce or enlarge the sketch. Vector images created in Illustrator also have the added benefit of having smaller file sizes that are easier to e-mail. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 65 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 71. Flat Sketching Low-rise Pleated Pants The first design consideration for any bottom garment is the length of the seam that runs up the Center Front, as this will determine where garment sits relative to the natural waist. On pants, or trousers, this Seam is referred to as the rise. Pants with a longer rise seams are also used for drop- crotch silhouettes such as dhoti pants. Pants with shorter rise seams sit lower on the body, beneath the natural waist. For this exercise you will flat sketch basic low-rise pants with an extension waistband. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 66 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 72. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 67 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 73. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 68 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 74. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 69 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 75. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 70 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 76. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 71 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 77. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 72 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 78. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 73 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 79. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 74 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 80. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 75 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 81. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 76 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 82. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 77 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 83. Sketching fabrics needs a good eye and proper observation, there are no rules but looking closely at the intricate play between shadow and light that fabric drapes form gives an idea how to reproduce the same effect on to paper. Since a human body is not a flat plane, fabric usually drapes around the body and somewhat reveals what underneath. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 78 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 84. BASIC RENDERING DENIMS Step 1 Base color Including all the details, draw the garment you want to make look like it’s made of denim. Denim clothes are usually stiff and when you draw the folds make sure they don’t look too soft. Lay down the first layer of color. The final version of the jacket will get much darker, so pick a light blue for base. Tip: The technique described in this tutorial can be applied to every single color in the palette. It is absolutely not obligatory to use blue as base color for your denim drawing. Step 2 Shadows Draw the shadows using a second layer of the same color or a slightly darker shade. Normally the clothes create shadows where there are creases or one surface is in FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 79 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 85. front of another ( see the pocket). Also notice how the color of the collar changes in depth. The same happens with the sleeve. Step 3 Add some texture Start adding narrowed lines all over the fabric. Make sure that the lines look organized and follow the same direction. It is best to use a color pencil in a very similar shade to the base color. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 80 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 86. Step 4 Even more texture In the places where there are shadows repeat the process, but using black/dark grey color pencil. For the places you think are brighter use a white pencil. Tip: Color pencils are good to represent denim in fashion sketches, because they already have the crispy texture we are looking for. Try not to overwork your drawing with black and white lines. If you do so, erase the unnecessary ones. Step 5 A realistic denim fabric Take your white pencil again and this time make strong vertical bleached effects. They are supposed to hint where the jeans clothes are worn-out. Put those only where the volume of the body is the most bulged. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 81 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 87. Step 6 Add some details to those clothes Find an orange or brownish shade that will overlay the base color of the jeans and underline the stitches. This is very specific for jeans. Color the buttons and if you have any other details. Step 7 Smoother You already have it done, but if the fabric looks too sharp for your taste I recommend you to take a paper blender and go over some parts of the sketch. This will give nice polished look of your fashion drawing. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 82 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 88. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 83 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 89. BASIC FABRIC RENDERING: FUR Step 1: Draw the outline After drawing the fashion figure, dress it with the fur garment that you have in mind. Avoid pushing too hard with the pencil, since you are going to erase this outline later. Tip: Remember that fur clothes are pretty voluminous and they outstand from the body more than regular clothes would. Step 2: Base: Color spots Take a soft pastel in a color of your choice and lay down spots all over your design. Try to make most of the color spots pointing in one direction and place them not too far away from each other. Step 3: Fur base Smudge the color spots with your finger. Move your finger from the upper part of the garment towards the bottom. Don’t smudge it in a circular or any other direction. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 84 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 90. Fur is a soft fabric, so don’t try to lock it in the boundaries of the clothes you are drawing – it is okay if your finger smudges a little bit outside of your initial outlines. Erase the pencil outline of the garment. Tip: For better results leave the surface unevenly color. It’s okay if some areas are lighter than others. Step 4: 1st Layer Fur is a fabric that consists of many layers and separate hairs. Take slightly darker color than the one you used for the base and spread new color spots. If you play with their sizes the fur will eventually look more realistic and eye-catching. Step 5: 2nd layer Smudge the color spots from the previous step, keeping the same direction of the hairs and draw the next fur layer. This one should be in even darker color – light or dark grey, sometimes even black could be used. These hairs should be much smaller and set further away from each other (if compared to the previous steps). Notice that now the direction of the hairs may vary slightly. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 85 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 91. Tip: Draw the fur hairs in the centre part and in the side parts of the clothes. Don’t concentrate only on the middle part, leaving the sides empty. Step 6: White Smudge the spots from the previous step and take a white soft pastel. Adding white hairs will complement the final look and make it three dimensional. Be careful with the white because it is tricky – if you overwork it the drawing will look bleached and flat. Step 7: Final touches Grab a sharp color pencil in a color several shades darker than the base color of your design. Go over the initial boundaries using short lines in different sizes. Their direction may vary slightly and sometimes you can join two lines so that they look like a little triangle. Allow yourself to go bravely over any accessories that are placed over your fur clothes belts FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 86 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 92. bags, jewelleries. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 87 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 93. BASIC RENDERING CHIFFON Step 1: The color of your fabric The first thing you need to do when drawing chiffon or other type of transparent fabric is to decide on its color. See-through materials will show what’s underneath, but will change its color. Start by coloring the areas that are not covered by the chiffon. If the chiffon is light prepare a lighter shade of the skin tone and the clothes color. If the chiffon is dark – prepare darker shade of the skin tone and the clothes. Step 2: Color the areas covered by the chiffon Start coloring the areas that are underneath the sheer fabric. Make sure you are not filling them in all the way to the edge. It’s okay if the coloring isn’t perfectly smooth at this point. You can play with the direction of your strokes as long as you stay in the outlines. Step 3: Color the chiffon fabric With the color you’ve picked gently mark the folds of the chiffon. It is important not to outline the sheer fabric or fully fill it with color at this point. You want to just gently brush trough some areas and nothing more. Step 4: Add another layer Grab s lighter shade of your chiffon color and add some more strokes. The opacity should be FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 88 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 94. greater close to the outline and getting lighter towards the inside. Take your time to make the transitions smooth and nice and try not to cover all the white spaces left from Step 2. Step 5: Add some pastel Use a soft pastel and carefully fill in almost the whole chiffon fabric. Leave empty spaces here and there and don’t make this layer too opaque. You want to place less amount of the pastel at the areas where you see only the sheer fabric and nothing underneath. Tip: For best results use your fingers (or a cotton swab) to take small amount of the pastel and gently smudge over your design. Step 6: Add depth It’s time to add some shadows and definition to your sheer garment. Use a pencil and go back to the folds to draw shadowed areas where you think they should be. Also emphasize the outlines underneath the chiffon in case they have disappeared. Don’t overwork it – less is more when drawing transparent materials. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 89 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 95. Step 7: Outlines As you know, a fashion sketch would look unfinished and fuzzy if you skip the outlining. Always use a shade slightly darker than you original tone and outline everything except for the areas underneath the chiffon. Tip: Outline the chiffon itself but leave the skin and clothes underneath as they are. This way they will look blurred and softer helping you to create the illusion of transparent textiles. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 90 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 96. BASIC RENDERING LACES Step 1 Base colour First thing you need to do is to find a darker than the skin tone colour and render the fabric with it. Tip: If you can’t find a proper shade just add a little bit of black to your skin tone colour and use it to colour the clothes you want. Step 2 Shadows Lay down some shadows to give your illustration more dimension. Draw the shadows as if your model was not wearing any clothes. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 91 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 97. Step 3 The mesh Draw net mesh all over the place where the lace is going to be. For best results use a well-sharpened pencil. Step 4 Lace ornaments The lace pattern should follow the diagonal direction of the mesh. Try to leave equal space between the ornaments and put the next row of pattern as shown in the picture (every ornament lays in the middle of the space between those above it ) You shouldn’t worry about making all of the figures exactly the same size and form. Just think of easy to repeat pattern and allow yourself to make some variations of it. Step 5 Ink with black the ornaments. Don’t forget to play with the width of the lines! FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 92 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 98. Step 6 Use the pencil again and draw small crosses between the ornaments. Again follow the mesh directions. Step 7 Attached some leaves to the ornaments. Fill about 2/3 of leaf body with black ink. Tip: Most of the lace fabrics have some kind of floral motives. However, if you don’t like flowers for any reason feels free to experiment with abstract forms on your liking. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 93 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 99. Step 8 Use dots for the contour of the leaves. This will add a lot of lace sensation to your drawing. Step 9 The endings Draw half-circles to cover the end of the lace. I make the outline double for a more complete look. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 94 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 100. Step 10 Put a “X” in every semicircle. Let it overshoot the borders of the circle. Step 11 Finish by drawing small dots on top of the X marks and a wavy line a bit higher. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 95 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 101. BASIC RENDERING LEATHER PANTS Step 1 A perfect fashion body Start by choosing an appropriate pose to show the best of your design. Often fashion illustrators would choose a pose of the model that is showing the side hem of the pants, but here I have picked a front view walking pose. Step 2 Design the pants draw the trousers with the belt loops, the pockets and the hems that are visible. Leave enough volume, so that the pants don’t look like tights. Even if you are designing a slim fit pants note that there is still some volume around the legs, especially in the lower part of the leg. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 96 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 102. Step 3 Draw the folds Leather pants have very specific folds. Usually they are many and they are sharp and tiny. Draw horizontal folds that affect the outline of the pants. Pay special attention to the crotch area, around the knees and in the lower end of the leg. Some of the folds are not horizontal, but slightly tilted - they should be the exception, not the rule. Step 4 The big secret of drawing leather When you are ready with your design and have drawn the outline you are only half way done. The rendering of the leather is the really tricky part. Using a pencil double the contour of the pants, but a few millimeters in. Note that the contour is not perfect – some parts of it are missing, some are thin, others are thicker. The diversity of the line is really important! Double some of the main folds as well. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 97 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 103. You may want to contour the biggest ones and those around the crotch. Step 5 Color Take a black marker and color everything except for the selections you did in the previous step. Erase the selections and refine with a black pen if needed (close to some smaller folds for example). Tip: If you have some details of the pants that you don’t want to lose (as are the pockets in the example illustration) just go around, leaving them white. Or you can come back later with a white gel pen of white gauche and draw the details again). Step 6 Reflections Leather is a shiny fabric. In order to make it look believable you have to add more reflections to the pants. Take a light grey colored pencil and draw some highlights in FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 98 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 104. the middle of the legs. Again you can interrupt the highlight. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 99 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 105. BASIC RENDERING OF FISHNET Step 1: The base Start your illustration by preparing a clean fashion figure. Since you will be erasing in next steps it’s better to ink you figure now. Step 2: Hot places Mark the most bulged parts of the figure. Often times they are in the middle of all shapes. Bulged are the middle of the hips zone, the tights, the knee and the muscles of the calves. Tip: To find easily which are the “hot places” try imagining that you were creating the figure out of clay. It helps if you close eyes and move your hand if you were really sculpting it. You will easily recognize the closest to you places. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 100 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 106. Step 3: Cold places In order to make sure the illustration will be really 3-dimentional you need to mark the “cold places” too. This is where the shapes are curving back. Usually this is at the edges of all forms and in the places where you have an object partially covered by another one. The former will be a shaded, cold zone. Mark close to the outlines, under the knees and the top part of the back leg. Tip: To help yourself you can imagine you are a sculptor again. Cold places are where you hand moves away from you and you curl your fingers. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 101 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 107. Step 4: Draw fishnet base Keep the latter two steps in mind ( or make a separate cheat list to look at it later) and cover the legs with an ordinary mesh. Don’t transform the lines in any way – just straight, simple, non-dimensional fishnet. Step 5: Add some volume Open your cheat list or recall the “hot places” – the most bulged parts of the fashion figure. Now erase them from the fishnet base, leaving the space white.These are the FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 102 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 108. places where, because of the volume underneath, the netting will be deformed. Step 6: A realistic fishnet Now fill the blank space with nettings again, but this time you will make the lines slightly curved up in the middle. Make sure that all lines are aligned and are connecting like they did before. Step 7: Cold places volume Now isolate the zones that you defined as “cold places”. This is where the shapes go FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 103 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 109. further away from the viewer. Don’t erase anything- just recall where they were. Step 8: Finished illustration Double the lines from the cold places. Everything that falls into a cold place should become darker, as it’s clearly visible in the example illustration. Ink your drawing and erase all the unnecessary pencil lines. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 104 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 110. BASIC RENDERING OF FLOWER PATTERN Step 1: Draw the basics Before you start you need to draw with clean lines the clothes that are about to get your print design. Make sure you have all the details carefully drawn and all the unnecessary lines- erased. Step 2: The secret of drawing prints The most essential thing about drawing any kind of pattern is to remember that clothes are not flat. If the fabric is distorted in any way, so will be its print too. In the example illustration I have marked with red the folds that stand out closer to the viewer. Tip: Quick technique to understand which part of the ruffles or folds is closer to you: try to close your eyes and think of the clothes as if they were made of clay. Tip: When drawing prints always have in mind that the pattern will get transform according to the volume of the clothes. So think in advance for the volume and the folds you have. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 105 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 111. Step 3: The folds Distortion Rule To make sure that all the flowers are the same size and are evenly spread over the fabric, simplify their form and start filling the surface of the dress. Notice how the their shape gets distorted because of the volume of the folds. Don’t just draw the pattern, but think of the volumes you identified in the previous step. Tip: The deepest the folds are, the more distorted the pattern gets. Step 4: Fill the rest of the dress surface with the print. Note that sometimes the center of the flower will happen to be in the deepest part of a fold. In this situation you will move FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 106 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 112. the tips of the florets slightly up, as they intersect with the Red shaded areas. Step 5: Draw flowers that are at the outline of the dress. Cut them in half or in other creative ways to show that they are wrapping around the body. Keep following the Folds distortion rule when you pass though Red shaded areas. Step 6: Floral patterns Once you have set the number, size and interaction with folds of your flower design it is time to draw it with more details. Don’t forget about your previous work here – FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 107 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 113. follow closely the flower guidelines with all their distortions. Step 7: Finish all the details of your flower print. Add leaves, sparkles or whatever you like to make it look beautiful. Use your imagination, be creative! Step 8: Color It is time to fill your fashion design with fun, vibrant spring colors or tender muted FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 108 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 114. tones. Pick shades that will bring out the best of your design. Step 9: Add some shadows The most important thing when adding shadows to your design is to darken the flowers pattern as well as the background. The shadows will go to the deepest parts of folds (that were not shaded in red areas). FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 109 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 115. BASIC RENDERING OF SEQUINS FABRIC Step 1 Base color Start by laying down a flat color all over your design. You don’t need to make the color appear perfectly flat, just cover the whole area you are planning to draw the sequins. Step 2 Drawing the sequins rows Next draw the sequins. Find a pen in a little bit darker shade and cover like 1/2 of the fabric with interceding circles. Notice that the rows of sequins are not from the top of the dress to it’s hemline. Sequins are drawn here and there just to hint the impression of such fabric. Step 3 Adding highlights Now add with white gel pen (or gouache) the highlights. Use the same technique of building the sequins row as in the previous step. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 110 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 116. Cover no more than 1/4 of the fabric with white sequins or it will look very unrealistic in the end. Tip: Even if you are drawing a black sequin dress I would still recommend you to draw the highlights in pure white. Sequins have high contrast and using the pure white helps you represent it. Step 4 Brighter! Fill some of the white sequins. Maybe the first one or two of each row. You can also draw some glittering stars to make the impressions of sequins fabric even stronger. Step 5 Blend it Using a white pencil try to blend some of the sequins rows. Pick rows that are already close to each other and concentrate only on one of the sides of the dress. Again – you don’t want to overwork it! FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 111 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 117. Step 6 Draw the shadows Finally take a pencil that is a few tones darker than your base color and mark some random darker rows. You can also use it to add volume to your design (e.g. under the breast and in the deepest folds usually) FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 112 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 118. BASIC RENDERING OF SILK & SATIN Step 1: How to draw the folds Different fabrics behave in different ways and the first step when drawing silk or satin is to make sure the folds are looking correct. Very specific for these textiles is that they form big folds that fall heavily, but also they create a lot of small creases in the pressure points. When drawing silk and satin make sure you include all these types of folds: 1. The “returning” type (collars, around crotch areas); 2. Many, small and angular folds (usually around waistline) 3. Big, heavy folds (usually in the lower part of the dress). The “How to draw folds:……” series will help you find the right place for them. Step 2: Paint the base color For the base color pick something that is slightly darker than the final result you are looking for. Use markers, tempera of watercolors to make the base as flat and even FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 113 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 119. as you can. Do NOT use color pencils for this step. Step 3: Finding shapes Even if you are not familiar with lightning and shadows you will be able to set the lighter parts of the design using the technique from “How to draw gold” tutorial. Here is how it works: Imagine that you are building your design out of clay like if it was a sculpture. The light goes to the parts where you are moving your hands towards yourself- the most bulged ones. Use a soft pastel and mark these areas gently. Be careful not to overwork it though – you want to keep about half of the original base color untouched. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 114 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 120. Tip: The highlight color needs to be to be a lot brighter and more saturated than the base. Avoid using pure white and go for bright yellow (green, orange, brown fabrics) bright pink ( red, purple, magenta fabrics) and sky blue for navy fabrics like in the example above. Step 4: Blending Blending is essential step when drawing silk and satin fabrics. Use your fingers or preferably a q-tip to blend the pastel. Try not to exceed the original proportion and size you have set in step 3. Erase if you notice that more than ½ of the design is in this soft, blended shade. Step 5: Add some magic! Now is where the real fun begins. Use the same bright soft pastel and draw another layer of highlight . Make sure you stay in the borders of the blended tone from Step 3. Don’t forget to mark all the folds too– vertical and horizontal. Tip: Satin and silk tend to form angular looking folds and creases. Avoid making them look too soft and flowing while coloring. Keep that edge! FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 115 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 121. Step 6: More blending Gently blend what you have from the previous step and make sure the second layer of light is clearly visible everywhere on the dress. Look at the chest area and each and every fold you have. Again - you don’t want to cover more than ½ of the dress with light. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 116 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 122. Step 7: Shadows Satin and silk are fabrics of huge contrast. They have soft, blended highlight areas and solid, strong dark areas. Use a black soft pastel to mark the darkness in your sketch. Fill close to the outlines, close to each and every fold and wherever your artist’s sense tells you to. Get creative, have some fun! Step 8: Real shadows Blend gently the black soft pastel from the previous step. Make sure the shadows don’t occupy the whole base color that you had left. Less is more in this case. After blending use a black color pencil and emphasize the areas that feel the most deep and dark to you. Use the imaginary clay sculpture technique if you hesitate where these places are. The more you “dig” in the sculpture the darker the shadow gets. Add a third layer of light. Smaller and brighter than the last ones, right in their FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 117 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 123. center. Step 9: Finishing touches By now you should have a pretty realistic looking drawing of silk/ satin fabric. It is time to make some extra blending and it’s ready to go. Continue building up highlights until they look soft, blended and brighter in the middle. Don’t lose the edges of the folds while coloring. Blend until it’s perfect and then clean up your sketch if it looks messy outside of the design outlines. The center of the satin highlights is a much brighter and more saturated color compared to the base. Here is a color chart that should help you with your colors FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 118 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 124. choise: FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 119 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 125. BASIC RENDERING OF ZEBRA PRINT Step 1: The base Create your fashion design. Since overcomplicated designs usually don’t go very well with this print, try to keep the clothes clean and simple for now. If you are drawing zebra print clothes you can make some realistic looking folds in the key places. Tip: The key places where folds are most visible are: the elbows, the wrist, the bust, the waits (not always), the crotch area, the knees and if you are drawing pants - the ankles area. Step 2: Give it some shadows Grab a grey color to make the garment realistic looking and mark the places where there are some folds. You don’t need to be so perfect with this as the stripes will cover the most of the blouse, but if you skip this step the design may look plain. Although zebra print is usually drawn in black and white, there may be countless color variations. No matter which color you chose for the background and the stripes, FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 120 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 126. always make sure you have marked with darker color the shadows. Step 3: How to draw zebra stripes? Start drawing the stripes that touch the outline of the blouse. When drawing the cut stripes remember to vary their thickness and length . Leave uneven spacing between them. Zebra stripes should look naturally spread; not too organized. When you are done- fill the shapes with black. Step 4: Shape I Fill some of the inner side with short stripes in the form shown below. Play with their outline as much as you want as long as you keep the stripe parallel to all the rest. Have a close look at how the illustration looks when a stripe happens to be over a fold. It gets distorted: separated in two divergent segments. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 121 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 127. Fill the new shapes. Step 5: Shape II The second type of stripes you can notice on the beautiful zebra pattern reminds a fork with two spikes. Draw some shapes cut in half at the outline of the garment. Those in the center part should be drawn whole. Fill with black. Step 6: Shape III The last type of zebra stripes is similar to the first one, but it has a hole in the middle. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 122 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 128. Play with the form of this shape and fill all the empty spaces left on your design. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 123 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]
  • 129. FDDI Questionnaire: Q. Design and illustrate a collection of Women’s performance apparel using at least five different poses and different views. Sports such as cycling and running, which requires body hugging silhouettes and athletic essence, will really test your ability to draw the women’s figure. The garment designs should be quite simple with minimal seaming, perhaps utilizing seamless knit technologies and colour blocking. FDDI/FD/SLB/FASHION ILLUSTRATIONII/SEM-IV [CONTROLLED] Page 124 [This Study material is not for Sale/Commercial use. It is prepared solely for purpose of private and internal circulation for the students of this college for their personal use only.]