Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Trends in humanitarian   and development assistance in a rapidlychanging global context      Tony German     Executive Dir...
• An independent organisationworking for the eradication ofabsolute poverty• Our mission is to empower andenable people to...
 International architecture: G8 to G20 – G7+ From DAC to post-Busan Global Partnership Brazil, Russia, India, China, So...
Extreme $1.25 a day poverty is falling:  from 40% in 1981, to 25% in 2008                  2015 & 2025: World             ...
If nothing changes, it will be 2080 beforeextreme poverty is eradicated – a continuing              humanitarian crisis
Brazil: President Dilma has committedto eradicating absolute poverty by 2015
Big resource mix with potential to eliminate $1.25/$2 a day povertyand reduce vulnerability to natural or manmade shocks t...
Afghanistan resource mix shows how modesthumanitarian and development assistance is  compared to military & security spend...
The number of non-DAC humanitarian donors                            has been growing in the last decade...               ...
Non-DAC humanitarian volumes up to 10% of global              humanitarian spend, somewhat volatile, but very          sig...
Aid as % public expenditure 2010
Non-DAC donor humanitarian aid contributions toYemen, Bangladesh and Maldives compared with DAC          donor contributio...
...with Gulf states representing the majority of non DAC                                          humanitarian flows      ...
Non DAC aid still a modest but growing part of global                                            picture – and aid overall...
Non DAC donors channel more humanitarian aid through governments                                                       35%...
Donors prioritise different countries for different reasons                 35%                            ODA and HA shar...
Sudan           HA from all donors                                             Pakistan                                   ...
For some countries humanitarian aid is more                                     relevant than development aid..           ...
Trends in humanitarian and development assistance in a rapidly changing global context
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Trends in humanitarian and development assistance in a rapidly changing global context

2,065 views

Published on

DIHAD presentation on trends in humanitarian and development assistance in a rapidly changing global context

Published in: News & Politics
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Trends in humanitarian and development assistance in a rapidly changing global context

  1. 1. Trends in humanitarian and development assistance in a rapidlychanging global context Tony German Executive Director Development Initiatives www.devinit.org
  2. 2. • An independent organisationworking for the eradication ofabsolute poverty• Our mission is to empower andenable people to make evidence-based and data-informed decisionsto deliver more effective use ofresources for poverty eradication• Produce accessible data, analysisand infographics• Offices in Bristol (UK), Nairobi(Kenya) and with partners DRT,Kampala (Uganda)
  3. 3.  International architecture: G8 to G20 – G7+ From DAC to post-Busan Global Partnership Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa, Indonesia, Gulf States, Foundations, private sector 95 non DAC countries contributed to tsunami – distinction between donor and recipient will become history, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Korea, bail outs – changing pattern of resources MDGs to High Level Panel and UN post 2015 settlement Open data and IT empowers even very poor and crisis- affected people to provide feedback, demand accountability, pursue opportunity Humanitarian community views on post 2015?
  4. 4. Extreme $1.25 a day poverty is falling: from 40% in 1981, to 25% in 2008 2015 & 2025: World Bank projections
  5. 5. If nothing changes, it will be 2080 beforeextreme poverty is eradicated – a continuing humanitarian crisis
  6. 6. Brazil: President Dilma has committedto eradicating absolute poverty by 2015
  7. 7. Big resource mix with potential to eliminate $1.25/$2 a day povertyand reduce vulnerability to natural or manmade shocks that cause crisis and can leave people in intergenerational poverty Foreign direct investment ODA Humanitarian aid Portfolio equity Other official flows Development finance institutions Public and private debt NGOs flows South-South Remittances cooperation Source: Development Initiatives based on World Bank, UNCTAD, IMF, UN , OECD DAC , annual reports
  8. 8. Afghanistan resource mix shows how modesthumanitarian and development assistance is compared to military & security spendingSource: Development Initiatives based on OECD DAC and SIPRI
  9. 9. The number of non-DAC humanitarian donors has been growing in the last decade... 180 160 non-DAC donors reporting to the FTS 140 120 DAC donors reporting to the FTSNumber of donors 100 130 80 95 101 92 60 70 52 54 57 47 41 40 40 20 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: Development Initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS and OECD DAC
  10. 10. Non-DAC humanitarian volumes up to 10% of global humanitarian spend, somewhat volatile, but very significant for some recipients – and growing in influence 1,000 10% 900 9% 800 8% 700 7% HA from non-DAC donors, volume 600 6%US$ million % of NDD 500 5% 400 4% HA from non-DAC donors, % of total 300 3% HA 200 2% 100 1% - 0% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Source: Development Initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS and OECD DAC
  11. 11. Aid as % public expenditure 2010
  12. 12. Non-DAC donor humanitarian aid contributions toYemen, Bangladesh and Maldives compared with DAC donor contributions, 2006-2009 2009 Maldives 71.9 8.7 2008 Yemen 105.4 17.7 2007 Bangladesh 172.5 75.4 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Non-DAC donors DAC donors Source: Development initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS and OECD DAC data, US$ million
  13. 13. ...with Gulf states representing the majority of non DAC humanitarian flows 1,000 900 800 700 600US$ million 500 400 300 200 100 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Gulf states BRICS EU 12 All other donors Source: Development Initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS
  14. 14. Non DAC aid still a modest but growing part of global picture – and aid overall has risen over the decade 160 "ODA like" flows from non- DAC countries 140 ODA from DAC countriesUS$ billion (constant 2010 prices) 120 100 80 60 40 20 - 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Source: Development Initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS and OECD DAC
  15. 15. Non DAC donors channel more humanitarian aid through governments 35% NDD, 33% Share of HJA through public 30% 25% 20% sector 1,200 15% DAC 10% donors, 9% 1,000 5% Other 0% 800 2007-11US$ million Multilateral 600 organisations 400 NGOs 200 Public sector 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Source: Development initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS and OECD DAC
  16. 16. Donors prioritise different countries for different reasons 35% ODA and HA shares to Oceania, 2007-11 30% 25%Share of total 20% Australia 15% Other DAC donors 10% 5% 0% HA ODA 40% ODA and HA shares to the Great Lakes region, 2007-11 35% 30% Share of total 25% 20% Belgium 15% Other DAC donors 10% 5% 0% ODA HA Source: Development initiatives based on OECD DAC data
  17. 17. Sudan HA from all donors Pakistan Haiti Palestine/OPT Ethiopia2009-11 Afghanistan Congo, Dem. Rep. Somalia Kenya Iraq Other 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Pakistan HA from Gulf States Sudan Palestinian territory, occupied Somalia Syrian Arab Republic 2009-11 Yemen Haiti Afghanistan Lebanon Bangladesh Other 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: Development initiatives based on UN OCHA FTS and OECD DAC
  18. 18. For some countries humanitarian aid is more relevant than development aid.. 80% 70% 60%HA as a % of total ODA 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Libya Somalia Korea, Dem. Rep. Chad Sudan Syria South Asia, regional Myanmar Zimbabwe Haiti Source: Development Initiatives based on OECD DAC

×