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The Unredeemed Captive-A Family Story From Early America<br />By Desiree Hopkins<br />The theme or thesis of the book it i...
The unredeemed captive assign #6 history 140
The unredeemed captive assign #6 history 140
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The unredeemed captive assign #6 history 140

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The unredeemed captive assign #6 history 140

  1. 1. The Unredeemed Captive-A Family Story From Early America<br />By Desiree Hopkins<br />The theme or thesis of the book it is about finding yourself identity and where you belong through different life experiences and situations. John Demos insights the reader into the personal lives of these historical figures. The plot of this book “The Unredeemed Captive” a Puritan minister from Massachusetts Williams and his family were members of a small New England town, and were captured during a raid by the French operating through a group of Native Americans and taken to Canada. Although Williams himself eventually was freed, his daughter Eunice remained “captivated” by the tribe and eventually became one of their own. The story plays with the concept of captivity and follows Williams’ response to his daughters continued captivity, marriage to an American Indian, and conversion to Catholicism. “The Unredeemed Captive” a Family Story by John Demos was about Eunice Williams’ captivity and the ordeal her family went through to try and get her to return home. Eunice was captured together with her family and over 100 other town residents in the Deerfield raid of 1704. Demos accurately described the Deerfield raid, the captives’ trek to Canada and some individual’s captivity experience. He gave reasons for the raid and why it was successful. In addition, he described the Kahnawake Indian village where Eunice lived, their society, customs and so forth. Since very little is known about Eunice, Demos attempted to describe how he thought her life would have been like by relating life in the Kahnawake Village. Yes, the author presents a vivid description of the time and place, when and where the story takes place. The Deerfield raid was significant because it was the largest raid excuted by the French and Indians. It yielded the largest number of captives taken in any raid. The raid sent shockwaves through the Massachusetts Colony even though they had been forewarned. The French started planning the raid early in 1703. Five different Native American Indians tribes started gathering in Montreal. It drew the attention of a few Native American who traded with the English. Rumors of the raid started circulating. However, overtime there were so many rumors circulating that no one paid them any attention. In Canada, circumstances caused the raid to be delayed. The raid occurred in winter which was unusual. There was three foot of snow on the ground. The raiders would have to trek over 250 miles to get to Deerfield and return the same distance with captives. On the night of the raid, the town was caught by surprise. The town watch had fallen asleep. After some resistance, the captives were rounded up and marched to Canada. The term “Raid” hardly fits the events described in this memorable true story of Eunice Williams, who lived through the terror that was masterminded by the French but largely carried out by Mohawks and other Indians. Eunice was a 7-year-old Puritan minister’s daughter when she was kidnapped in the attack oops, sorry, “raid” on Deerfield at about 4 a.m. on February 29. Her mother died on a subsequent forced march to Canada, killed by an Indian who “slew her with his hatchet at one stroke,” a son wrote. Her father and siblings were eventually released. But Eunice stayed with the Indians, one of whom she married, for puzzling reasons. In Canada, Williams was ransoms by the French governor. He managed to get the French governor to ransom all of his children but Eunice. Williams arranged a visit to see Eunice. When he finally spoke to Eunice, Williams was relieved that she was well and had not forgotten her catechism. He seemed more concerned about the Catholic threat than anything else. Since he couldn’t arrange for her ransom, Williams had no choice but to leave Eunice with her Indian master. He was told by the French that “the Indians would rather cut out their hearts than part with their adoptive captives.” Williams’s returned a celebrity after three years of captivity. He writes his narrative at the insistence of Cotton Mather’s, a prominent citizen of the colony, a prominent citizen of the colony. All of his children except Eunice returned home. The long ordeal of trying to get Eunice to return began. After about ten years, Williams sent a representative who talked to Eunice. She was now married to an Indian and had forgotten English. Two interpreters were needed, one to translate English to French, the other to translate French to Mohawk. Eunice didn’t speak during the interview until the end. The representative and then her priest pleaded with her to visit her father. She did not argue neither did she gives reasons. She just said no. Demos explained using a journal from one of the commissioners who regularly talked to captives, “I think it would be far easier to gain twice the number of French and Indians to go with us than English captives.” Williams saw Eunice once more in 1714. This was the last time he visited her. In 1729, John Williams dies. After his death, Stephen carried on the ordeal of trying to get Eunice to return home. She finally began to visit with her family. From John Williams being held by captive and going back to Puritanism when released to Eunice whom stayed with the Indians her whole life, this book shows many views points from different individuals. “The Unredeemed Captive” shows the path of adduction, and adoption of American Settlers by Indians. Undercurrents of racism, moral superiority often trouble this relationship, especially the Native Americans.<br />

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