Why does Hong Kong need Public Boat Clubs

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On Friday 16 December 2011, the Town Planning Board rejected the development of a marina,
hotel and luxury housing on Lamma. This, despite the financial firepower from a listed company, and the employment of a senior member of the Town Planning Board and a well-known person in Hong Kong's sailing scene. (Planning Application Y/I-LI/1 - http://www.info.gov.hk/tpb/en/plan_application/Y_I-LI_1.html). (http://www.bol-hk.com/)

The proposal from the developer who owns a few village and agriculture lots on Lamma was too far-fetched, but the large-scale marina, water sports and sailing centre captured the imagination of many and was strongly supported by the Home Affairs Bureau and Tourism Commission.

With our 1,000 kilometres of spectacular coastline, more than 250 islands and beautiful seas, Hong Kong is desperately short of facilities that allow the public to enjoy Hong Kong's waters for leisure, recreation and sports.

People are forced to use crumbling steps to get on and off boats in hot spots such as Repulse Bay and Deep Water Bay. Our few water sports and sailing centres are full. No one can afford the private marinas and their waiting lists for boat moorings are very long.

Hong Kong desperately needs public clubs where people can store and maintain boating equipment. Buses and the MTR do not welcome passengers carrying surfboards. No one has a garden or shed, or apartments big enough to store sports equipment.

The Home Affairs Bureau, which happily endorsed the destruction of Lamma, should take charge.

It has so far failed to ensure that man-made waterfronts, where there is no threat to the environment, have facilities for water-based leisure, recreation and sports. Ma On Shan, Kai Tak, Tseung Kwan O and Aberdeen/Ap Lei Chau are ideal with their road and rail access and large local populations. The opportunity for water activities on Junk Bay was identified as early as 1982.

Rather than a world-class municipal marina and sailing facilities, all that is available today in Tseung Kwan O is a small unlicensed private operator, the Hoi Fan Fishing Club, where you have to climb over fences and rocks to get onto a small rented sampan with an outboard engine.

Unless the bureau starts to care, the planned cross-bay bridge will block sail boats from using Junk Bay. And we will be able to look at the water, but not get on it and use it.

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Why does Hong Kong need Public Boat Clubs

  1. 1. Why Hong Kong needs Public Boat Clubs Prepared by: August 2011
  2. 2. Categories of Leisure Vessels Source: Hong Kong Marine Department Owners of pleasure vessels use private club marinas with high entry fees, and monthly club, storage and handling fees unaffordable for sampan owners. All private marinas are full. Watersports centres (either LCSD or clubs) offer rental and storage space for craft. All of them are operating at capacity. No formal berthing/storage facilities are available for sampans which are commonly ued for fishing. Type No. Registered (2009) Typical Length (m) 1. Outboard Open Sampans 2,559 < 10 2. Pleasure Vessels 6,473 3-50+ 3. Water Sports Craft Not registered < 10
  3. 3. Outboard Open Sampans <ul><li>The affordable yacht </li></ul><ul><li>for the common man </li></ul><ul><li>No facilities in Hong Kong: </li></ul><ul><li>Improvised berthing </li></ul><ul><li>Improvised mooring </li></ul><ul><li>Improvised storage </li></ul>In Europe/USA people use a trailer and car for transport and park the boat in their yard or shed. This does not apply in HK.
  4. 4. ? ? An affordable boat, but where to keep it in Yau Tong? People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  5. 5. ? ? Ready to risk your life to enjoy your boat in Tsing Yi? People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  6. 6. Creative solutions in Tsing Yi! People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  7. 7. ? Fishing in Junk Bay, how to get safely on your boat in Tseung Kwan O? People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  8. 8. Tying up your boat in Stanley – will it be there after a typhoon? People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  9. 9. Hiding your boat under the bridges of Ma On Shan, but where to fix it? Good that people are honest and don’t steal your engine. People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  10. 10. Hiding your boat under trees. Just hope no one calls the Marine Department. People do not have a yard, trailer or shed and dependent on public facilities. Outboard Open Sampans
  11. 11. The landing steps for the public to get on and off boats in Repulse Bay and Deepwater Bay, well known destinations for water sports and leisure marine activities on Hong Kong Island. Outboard Open Sampans
  12. 12. A public boat club is needed in each major water body Base Map: Google Map Tolo Harbour Sai Kung & Clear Water Bay Victoria Harbour & Junk Bay Hong Kong Island South Lantau & Islands N.T. West
  13. 13. <ul><li>A boat club is an anchorage or boat rack for storage of leisure craft with land-based facilities for the users available at low cost. </li></ul><ul><li>A public boat club is built / operated by a non-profit organization. Currently none is available in Hong Kong, the closest is the Tai Po Boat Club. Government offers water sports centres for training and rental only. </li></ul><ul><li>Seabed rights for moorings and adjacent land for supporting facilities are to be provided by Government for nominal cost. </li></ul><ul><li>Main infrastructure (slipways, steps, breakwater) are to be included in public work for the site. </li></ul><ul><li>Hoist, racks and pontoons require subsidy or development rights for F&B facilities on the site. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintenance and operations to be recovered from berthing fees. </li></ul>Public Boat Club Defined
  14. 14. <ul><li>WET BERTHS (e.g. pontoons, anchorage) DRY BERTHS (e.g. racks) </li></ul><ul><li>LAND-BASED SUPPORT FACILITIES (e.g. parking, changing rooms, lockers, security, hoist, repair yard, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>for LEISURE CRAFT (e.g. sampans, sail boats, junks) </li></ul>Public Boat Club Defined
  15. 15. Clubhouse Parking Slipway Wet berths and pontoons Hoist Boat yard with dry berths Access Road
  16. 16. Wet berths Wet berths: Floating pontoons Public Boat Club Defined
  17. 17. Public Boat Club Defined
  18. 18. Public Boat Club Defined
  19. 19. Interface with promenade Public Boat Club Defined Interface with public promenade

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