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Active Design –Creating Opportunitiesfor Active Living withinCommunitiesDavid Burney, Commissioner,New York City Departmen...
THE 19th CENTURY:                              THE 21st CENTURY:         Infectious Diseases                              ...
100+ years ago, urban conditions were a breeding ground            for infectious disease epidemics                       ...
The response was through built environment interventions                     1842     New York’s water system established ...
The Results: Infectious disease rates             BEFORE the wide use                of antibiotics!57.1%         45.8%   ...
The epidemics of today are:                CHRONIC DISEASES             (obesity, diabetes, heart disease                 ...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985                              (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woma...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1986                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1987                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1988                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1989                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1990                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1991                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1992                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1993                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1994                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1995                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1996                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1997                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1998                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 1999                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 2000                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                            BRFSS, 2001                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lb...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                            BRFSS, 2002                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lb...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                            BRFSS, 2003                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lb...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                            BRFSS, 2004                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lb...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 2005                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 2006                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 2007                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 2008                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults                           BRFSS, 2009                             (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs...
Diabetes trends among U.S. adults     1994                                   2000                                  2009No ...
Only half of NYC elementary school children are at a healthy weight                                                       ...
World Obesity rates among adults - 2011
Obesity and Diabetes have increased rapidly.Our genetics have not changed in one generation, but             our built env...
Growing EvidenceResearch Improving Health through Building, Street Evidence-based Base for shows that we can Increase Phys...
WE CAN ADDRESS THESE ISSUES AT THE BUILDING,Growing Evidence Base for Improving Health through Building, StreetSTREET AND ...
Translating Health Evidence into Non-Health Policies Affecting HealthKEY LESSONS LEARNED:• The Need for Partnerships – Cor...
Fit City Conferences  Fit-City:  Promoting Physical Activity Through Design          Fit-City 3:          Promoting Physic...
The Active Design GuidelinesPublished in 2010, the Guidelines broughttogether a number of best practices fordesign profess...
Creation of the GuidelinesActive Design Guidelines Team                                  New York City Staff*             ...
IMPLEMENTATION: Inter-Sectoral City Policy Initiatives onBuilt Environment    Synergies:    • Health    • Safety    • Envi...
Co-benefits of Active Design: Improve the Environment                           Fuel / Electricity Use   Air Quality   Obe...
Co-benefits: Create more accessible places • Creating safer places to   walk, take transit, & for the   elderly and people...
Co-benefits: Save money, particularly for low-income people         People in walkable, transit-rich neighborhoods spend o...
Building Design Strategies Site + Building DesignStairs: promoting easy accessStairs: accessibility, visibility, convenien...
Building Design StrategiesStairs: aestheticsStairs to receive plenty     Art in stairs to increase   Stairs designed toof ...
Building StrategiesStairs: signage and promptsMotivational Signage placed at points of decisionPromoting stair use at work...
City Policy + ImplementationUse of LEED Green Building Credits that Promote PA Development density            Public trans...
Building Design StrategiesRecreational programmingProvide fun and affordablerecreational opportunities
City Policy + ImplementationNYC Green Codes                    Increasing drinking water access through better tap        ...
City Policy + ImplementationNYC Green Codes              How do we incentivize good stair design and remove              b...
NYC// Complete NeighborhoodsWalkable
NYC: Complete Neighborhoods         JOBS   LOCAL RETAIL   OPEN SPACE
City Policy + Implementation City Policy + ImplementationZoning for Bicycle Parking                    Zoning for Bicycle ...
Site + Building DesignBicycle parking + storage                            Secure Bike Storage with Easy Access
City Policy + ImplementationNYC World Class Streets                                Remaking NYC’s public realm:           ...
Urban DesignPedestrian Environment / Streetscape Provide places of rest                    Enliven the sidewalk           ...
Playstreets On request of DOT, Playstreets Coordinator hired by Health Evaluation by Health: Ages of children attending Pl...
owww.nyc.gov/doto www.facebook.com/NYCDOT        o #NYC_DOT
Transit: InfrastructureProvide attractive and sheltered seating        areas to encourage use            of transit routes...
ty Policy + Implementation                       Streetscape Components                                                Ste...
City Policy + Implementation City Policy + ImplementationCreation of Additional Active Spaces: Summer Streets• DOT closes ...
City Policy + ImplementationNYC FRESH Program                                  FRESH Food Store Areas                     ...
Impacts• Won 5 National Awards (Health Policy, Environmental Protection,  Sustainable Buildings, Architecture)• Distribute...
ImpactsTo date, NYC has…•Increased:       - Commuter cycling 262%       - Bus and subway ridership 10%       - Stair use -...
Established in New York City in 2012, the Center for                       Active Design works to support prevention and  ...
Anticipated Programs at the Center for Active Design Award and Certification Program: recognizing and providing incentive...
Fit-City:        Promoting Physical Activity Through Design                                                      Fit-City ...
Implementing the GuidelinesTechnical assistance and trainingTesting the guidelinesthrough an interactive andinterdisciplin...
Mentoring communities in public healthPartnership environment       Built Environment & Health and the builtSupported by ...
Creation of Additional Resources:                             Active Design SupplementsThe Center is now creating 5 nation...
David Burney - How New York is getting active
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David Burney - How New York is getting active

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David Burney, Commissioner for Design and Construction, New York City
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David Burney - How New York is getting active

  1. 1. Active Design –Creating Opportunitiesfor Active Living withinCommunitiesDavid Burney, Commissioner,New York City Department ofDesign and Construction
  2. 2. THE 19th CENTURY: THE 21st CENTURY: Infectious Diseases Chronic Diseases, many of which are “Diseases of Energy” The emerging design solutions for health19th Century codes, planning and infrastructure parallel sustainable design solutions as weapons in the battle against contagious
  3. 3. 100+ years ago, urban conditions were a breeding ground for infectious disease epidemics Over-crowding in Lower Manhattan Major epidemics: 1910 density: 114,000 people/ sq. mi. Air/droplet-borne diseases: TB + 2011 density: 67,000 people/ sq. mi. Water-borne diseases: Inadequate systems for Cholera garbage, water, and sewer, leading to pervasive filth Vector-borne diseases: and polluted water supplies Yellow-fever
  4. 4. The response was through built environment interventions 1842 New York’s water system established – an aqueduct brings fresh water from Westchester. 1857 NYC creates Central Park, hailed as “ventilation for the working man’s lungs”, continuing construction through the height of the Civil War 1881 Dept. of Street-sweeping created, which eventually becomes the Department of Sanitation 1901 New York State Tenement House Act banned the
  5. 5. The Results: Infectious disease rates BEFORE the wide use of antibiotics!57.1% 45.8% AFTER the wide use of antibiotics! 11.3% 2.3% 9% 1880 1940 2011
  6. 6. The epidemics of today are: CHRONIC DISEASES (obesity, diabetes, heart disease & strokes, cancers) Top 5 Causes of Death in U.S.: 1.Tobacco, 2. Obesity, 3. High Blood Pressure, 4. High Blood Sugar, 5. Physical InactivityEnergy in: Energy out:Food Exercise
  7. 7. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  8. 8. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  9. 9. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  10. 10. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  11. 11. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  12. 12. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  13. 13. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  14. 14. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  15. 15. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  16. 16. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  17. 17. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  18. 18. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  19. 19. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  20. 20. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  21. 21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  22. 22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  23. 23. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  24. 24. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  25. 25. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  26. 26. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  27. 27. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  28. 28. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  29. 29. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  30. 30. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  31. 31. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  32. 32. Diabetes trends among U.S. adults 1994 2000 2009No Data <4.5% 4.5-5.9% 6.0-7.4% 7.5-8.9% >9.0% Source: CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. National Diabetes Surveillance System available at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics
  33. 33. Only half of NYC elementary school children are at a healthy weight Underweight 4% Obese 24% Normal Weight 53% Overweight 19% Source: NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, NYC Vital Signs, 2003.
  34. 34. World Obesity rates among adults - 2011
  35. 35. Obesity and Diabetes have increased rapidly.Our genetics have not changed in one generation, but our built environment has!
  36. 36. Growing EvidenceResearch Improving Health through Building, Street Evidence-based Base for shows that we can Increase Physicaland Neighborhood Design Street and Neighborhood Design Activity through Building, OOD SCALES Designing to Point-of-Decision stair prompts increase stair Signs placed at elevators & escalators encouraging stair use, w/ info on use benefits of stair use Median 50% increase in stair use Design and aesthetic interventions Music & art in stairwells Design stairs to be more convenient and visible Skip-stop elevators 3300% increase in stair use Designing to increase active Enhancing access to places for physical activity, such as creating recreation walking trails or having onsite or nearby parks, playgrounds and exercise facilities (homes & worksites) increases leisure-time activity and weight loss Walking, Bicycling and Transit-oriented development Designing to Designs to improve street safety and aesthetics (less crime and traffic / increase active more greening), having sidewalks and bike paths connected to transportation destinations, mixed land use, high population density Median increase in physical activity 35% to 161%
  37. 37. WE CAN ADDRESS THESE ISSUES AT THE BUILDING,Growing Evidence Base for Improving Health through Building, StreetSTREET AND NEIGHBORHOOD SCALESand Neighborhood Design Increased access to healthy foods and beverages within food Increasing environmentsaccess to healthy foods and beverages within food Increased Access to environments Healthy Food Increased access to premises that provide healthy foods and and Beverages Increased access to premises that provide healthy foods and beverages – e.g. supermarkets, farmers markets, drinking water beverages – e.g. supermarkets, farmers markets, drinking water facilities facilities Decreasing Decreased exposure to unhealthy foods such as trans fats and Exposure to sugary drinks Unhealthy Food and Decreased exposure to unhealthy food premises Beverages Point-of- Information at points of selection and purchase of food Decision Information
  38. 38. Translating Health Evidence into Non-Health Policies Affecting HealthKEY LESSONS LEARNED:• The Need for Partnerships – Core and Extensive• Finding Synergies and Co-Benefits• Complementary Roles of Core Partners – Health: Presenting the available research-based evidence and the epidemiology of disease; organized early meetings/conferences to do so – Design and Construction, Transportation and City Planning: Ideas of what’s feasible in the current local context; identifying opportunities and mechanisms, including and especially synergistic efforts – Health: Playing a supporting role for implementing ideas – presenting the health evidence; assisting with strategy and planning, undertaking studies to inform implementation planning and evaluation; providing resources for coordination of intersectoral meetings, initiatives and follow-up – Design and Construction, Transportation and City Planning: Leadership and participation in the efforts – Researchers: evidence reviews and synthesis, evaluation research• Garnering Review, Feedback and Inputs from an Extensive Group of Partners• Using Evidence-Based and Best-Practice Strategies• Using Annual Conferences as Strategic Milestones to Highlight Successes and Craft Strategic Next Steps with Extensive Group of Partners• Key Roles for Peer-to-Peer Partnerships and Mentoring among Cities
  39. 39. Fit City Conferences Fit-City: Promoting Physical Activity Through Design Fit-City 3: Promoting Physical Activity Through Design
  40. 40. The Active Design GuidelinesPublished in 2010, the Guidelines broughttogether a number of best practices fordesign professionals.Chapters1) Environmental Design and Health: Past and Present2) Urban Design: Creating an Active City1) Building Design: Creating Opportunities for Daily Physical Activity1) Synergies with Sustainable and Universal DesignThe Guidelines can be downloaded at: www.centerforactivedesign.org
  41. 41. Creation of the GuidelinesActive Design Guidelines Team New York City Staff* Department of City Planning Editor Alexandros Washburn, AIA Irene Chang, March, MPhil Department of Design and Chief Urban Designer Cheng+Snyder Construction David Burney, FAIA Skye Duncan, MSAUD, BArch Community, Academic and Commissioner Associate Urban Designer Private SectorMichael Bloomberg Mayor’s Office of Management and Ernest Hutton, Hutton Associates, Margo Woolley, AIAMAYOR Budget INC. Assistant Commissioner, Joyce Lee, AIA, LEED AP Ellen Martin, 1100 Architects Architecture and EngineeringDavid Burney Chief Architect Linda Polack Marpillero Pollak, DivisionCOMMISSIONER ArchitectsDepartment of Design and Vitoria Milne, MID Academic Partners John Pucher, Bloustein School ofConstruction Director, Office of Creative Services Planning and Public Policy, Craig Zimring PhD. Rutgers University Department of Health and Mental Professor, Georgia Institute of Jessica Spiegel, 1100 ArchitectsThomas Farley Technology Hygiene William Stein, Dattner ArchitectsCOMMISSIONER College of Architecture Shin-Pei Tsay, TransportationDepartment of Health and Mental Karen Lee, MD, MHSc, FRCPC AlternativesHygiene Director, Built Environment Gayle Nicoll, M.Arch, PhD, OAA Associate Professor and Chair, Thanks to all the designJanette Sadik-Khan Sarah Wolf, MPH, RD University of Texas at San Antonio Built Environment Coordinator practitioners and organizationsCOMMISSIONER Department of Architecture who participated in the 2009Department of Transportation Department of Transportation Design Charrette to help test the Julie Brand Zook, M.Arch Wendy Feuer, MA Researcher, Georgia Institute of Guidelines prior to its publication.Amanda Burden Assistant Commissioner of Urban TechnologyCOMMISSIONER Design and Art, Division of Planning College of ArchitectureDepartment of City Planning and Sustainability *We also thank the many city Reid Ewing, PhD agencies that gave input including Hanna Gustafsson Professor, University of Utah, the Depts of Parks and Former Urban Fellow, Division of Department of Recreation, Buildings, Housing Planning and Sustainability City and Metropolitan Planning Preservation and Development, School Construction Authority, American Institute of Architects Aging, and Mayor’s Offices of New York Chapter Long-Term Planning and Fredric Bell, FAIA Sustainability, and of People with Executive Director Disabilities. Sherida Paulsen, FAIA 2009 President
  42. 42. IMPLEMENTATION: Inter-Sectoral City Policy Initiatives onBuilt Environment Synergies: • Health • Safety • Environmental Sustainability • Universal Accessibility • Economic Benefitswww.nyc.gov/adg
  43. 43. Co-benefits of Active Design: Improve the Environment Fuel / Electricity Use Air Quality Obesity/Diabetes/ Heart DiseaseBiking or walking rather √ √ √than automotivetransportStairs rather than √ √ √elevators and escalatorsActive recreation rather √ √ √than televisionSafe tap water rather √ √ √than bottled and cannedbeveragesFresh local produce √ √ √rather than unhealthyprocessed foods
  44. 44. Co-benefits: Create more accessible places • Creating safer places to walk, take transit, & for the elderly and people with disabilities. • Making elevators more available for those who need them.
  45. 45. Co-benefits: Save money, particularly for low-income people People in walkable, transit-rich neighborhoods spend only 9 percent of their monthly income on transportation costs; those in auto-dependent neighborhoods spend 25 percent. Source: Center for Transit-Oriented Development
  46. 46. Building Design Strategies Site + Building DesignStairs: promoting easy accessStairs: accessibility, visibility, convenience Stair of Prominence Skip Stop Elevators to Enclosed stairs that use and Visual Interest increase stair use Fire Rated Glass to Increase Visibility
  47. 47. Building Design StrategiesStairs: aestheticsStairs to receive plenty Art in stairs to increase Stairs designed toof natural daylight visual interest invite users
  48. 48. Building StrategiesStairs: signage and promptsMotivational Signage placed at points of decisionPromoting stair use at work – Stair Week
  49. 49. City Policy + ImplementationUse of LEED Green Building Credits that Promote PA Development density Public transportation and community access Bicycle storage and connectivity changing rooms LEED Physical Activity
  50. 50. Building Design StrategiesRecreational programmingProvide fun and affordablerecreational opportunities
  51. 51. City Policy + ImplementationNYC Green Codes Increasing drinking water access through better tap water facilities – passed in Plumbing Code
  52. 52. City Policy + ImplementationNYC Green Codes How do we incentivize good stair design and remove barriers to stair use through Zoning and Building Codes?
  53. 53. NYC// Complete NeighborhoodsWalkable
  54. 54. NYC: Complete Neighborhoods JOBS LOCAL RETAIL OPEN SPACE
  55. 55. City Policy + Implementation City Policy + ImplementationZoning for Bicycle Parking Zoning for Bicycle Parking: Increasing active transport by providing safe and secure parking for bike commuters
  56. 56. Site + Building DesignBicycle parking + storage Secure Bike Storage with Easy Access
  57. 57. City Policy + ImplementationNYC World Class Streets Remaking NYC’s public realm: • Street Design Manual • Plaza Program • World Class Boulevards • Complete Streets Projects and Design Standards, incl. bike lanes • Public Art Program • New Streetscape Materials • Coordinated Street Furniture Program • Weekend Pedestrian and Cycling Streets
  58. 58. Urban DesignPedestrian Environment / Streetscape Provide places of rest Enliven the sidewalk Attractive plazas have to complement with street cafes mix of trees, lighting, & active walking movable/ fixed seating and jogging Integrate public art into the streetscape
  59. 59. Playstreets On request of DOT, Playstreets Coordinator hired by Health Evaluation by Health: Ages of children attending Playstreets (from surveys): Ages 1-13 Visited Playstreets at least once before: >80% Average length of time children stayed at the Playstreet (from surveys): ~1.5hours Most likely activity if children had not come to the Playstreet: TV or other inside activity: 52% Outdoor activity: 38% Indoor or outdoor activity equally likely: 10%
  60. 60. owww.nyc.gov/doto www.facebook.com/NYCDOT o #NYC_DOT
  61. 61. Transit: InfrastructureProvide attractive and sheltered seating areas to encourage use of transit routes Bus Rapid Transit systems for more convenient and faster travel
  62. 62. ty Policy + Implementation Streetscape Components Steinway Street Master Plan
  63. 63. City Policy + Implementation City Policy + ImplementationCreation of Additional Active Spaces: Summer Streets• DOT closes Park Avenue to traffic from Brooklyn Bridge to Central Park and the Upper East Side on Saturdays in August• Evaluation: – Average amount of physical activity from distances walked, ran, biked on route: >40 minutes of vigorous physical activity, or >70 minutes of moderate physical activity – 24% of people were those who didn’t meet PA Recs – 87% of participants got to event by active modes – High Needs Neighborhoods and Neighborhoods Outside Manhattan underrepresented
  64. 64. City Policy + ImplementationNYC FRESH Program FRESH Food Store Areas FRESH Food Store Program Areas where zoning and financial incentives AdditionalFoodeas owherPreoFRESH efinasancial incentives may be available FRESH ar St re gram Ar apply Additional areas where Additional areas where FRESH financial incentives may be available FRESH financial incentives may be availableZoning and tax incentives for providing fresh food optionsin the city’s underserved areas with high health needs
  65. 65. Impacts• Won 5 National Awards (Health Policy, Environmental Protection, Sustainable Buildings, Architecture)• Distributed >15,000 copies of ADGs nationally & internationally• Trained >3,000 built environment professionals in NYC and U.S.• Mentored 14 other U.S. cities and communities (others now adopting initiatives such as integrating use of ADGs, “Burn Calories, Not Electricity” Stair Prompts, Playstreets, Fit City)
  66. 66. ImpactsTo date, NYC has…•Increased: - Commuter cycling 262% - Bus and subway ridership 10% - Stair use - >40% increase at 9 mos in 10-story low-income housing - Places for children’s play - ~40 new Playstreets permitted• Decreased: - Traffic fatalities 30% - Traffic volumes 25% - Car registrations 5%• Started Reversing Childhood Obesity (also in San Diego!)
  67. 67. Established in New York City in 2012, the Center for Active Design works to support prevention and control of obesity and chronic diseases by increasing opportunities for physical activity through the design of buildings, streets, and neighborhoods.The Center for Active Design is a non-profitorganization that has grown out of an inter-disciplinary partnership among New YorkCity agencies, the American Institute ofArchitects New York City Chapter (AIANY),private sector architects and developers,and academic partners. After collaborativelydeveloping the Active Design Guidelinespublished in 2010, the Center for ActiveDesign was established to fosterwidespread implementation of ActiveDesign strategies among public and privatesector design, planning, policy and realestate professionals. www.centerforactivedesign.org
  68. 68. Anticipated Programs at the Center for Active Design Award and Certification Program: recognizing and providing incentives for individual and project achievements in Active Design, Training: for all design and real estate professions, Technical Assistance: ranging from providing resources for implementing strategies for building managers to research and rollout consulting to other municipalities nationally and internationally, Policy Development:: implementing zoning, code, and other incentives, Evaluation and Research: linking to researchers, ongoing data collection and support, Communications: using printed material, website and other material for education and training Knowledge Translation and Resource Development: using available research for updating practice and policy materials, www.centerforactivedesign.org
  69. 69. Fit-City: Promoting Physical Activity Through Design Fit-City 3: Promoting Physical Activity Thro Fit City conferences havehelped promote Active Design
  70. 70. Implementing the GuidelinesTechnical assistance and trainingTesting the guidelinesthrough an interactive andinterdisciplinaryDesign CharretteParticipants:Government Agencies/Developers/Architects/LandscapeArchitects/Engineers
  71. 71. Mentoring communities in public healthPartnership environment Built Environment & Health and the builtSupported by CDC Communities Putting Prevention to Work Mentoring grant  Partnership between NYCDOHMH, AIANY, and 14 communities All communities are recipients of CPPW grants Boston MA ~ Cherokee Nation OK ~ Chicago IL ~ Cook County IL ~ Douglas County NE ~ Jefferson County AL ~ King County WA ~ Louisville KY ~Miami-Dade County FL ~ Multnomah County OR ~ Nashville TN ~ Philadelphia PA ~ Pima County AZ ~ San Diego CA
  72. 72. Creation of Additional Resources: Active Design SupplementsThe Center is now creating 5 nationally applicable Active Design Appendix Documents 1. Active Design: Shaping the Sidewalk Experience 2. Active Design: Opportunities in Zoning 3. Active Design: Guidelines for a Suburban Context 4. Active Design: Injury Prevention 5. Active Design: Affordable Design in Affordable Housing

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