Innovations in Intercultural leadership

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  • .30Who’s heard this:Working harder at old ‘solutions’ won’t workIt’s a cliché. But it touches something, I think, in many of us who give their heart and soul to making a difference, and struggle to feel as though real progress is barelybeing made…Or, in those moments perhaps when we pause to really think and let the doubts creep in, that we admit that we’re:Tired of the same old rhetoricDiscouraged at the lack of breakthrough progressSick of other’s cynicism, and fearful of our own.(turn)
  • New thinking new language new approaches are neededClick
  • 121And to get there a new type of leadership neededLeadership that isINTERCULTURAL – that can create a new intercultural paradigmIs SystemicAcknowledges, challenges and recognises the place of values and ethicsThat creates new language, new ways of communicating, engaging and workingAnd that is embedded in action, innovation, learningThis is about the way Aboriginal and other people lead – and lead together. About the interface, the creation of a shared future.But before we get into desert leadership some background and context of where it came from.So…
  • 257This is our unified country – unified by remote and very remote Australia that makes up 85% of the landmass.Today remote Australia is perhaps most often thought of aswhere our mines and wealth arewhere we might drive around on holidaysor where there is Aboriginal dysfunction.It is undoubtedly very different to that experienced by the majority of Australians on a day-to-day basis.
  • 3.31An obvious difference is the population density.Remote Australia is sparsely populatedRemote Australia has huge distances.
  • It contains the greater proportion of discrete aboriginal settlements and the relative proportion of Aboriginal people in the population is much higher that you would find in metropolitan Australia.So the intercultural interface between Abl and other Australians is more obvious, and pretty well affects everyone who lives in Desert and remote Australia. It’s not something that can be ignored or brushed aside.There are many differences in the demography and geography of Desert and remote Australia. And they matter to how things can happen. The system is different, and unless this is taken in to account failure is almost inevitable.4:00
  • 1031So DKA kicked off the thinking and developed the essential framework.The key unique feature of the approach was that it is intercultural. It is specifically for Aboriginal and other Australians – not just for Aboriginal people.It is about bringing emerging Aboriginal leaders with other emerging leaders together learn: how to become better individual leaders to learn how to lead together and to make an impact on the town.So, it is about the interface, the development of a shared future and commitment to making a difference.It also brought in other key Desert Knowledge elements: systems thinking, collaboration, strong values, innovation, action learning and working with the community to build a coalition of shared purpose.We have worked in partnership with Social Leadership Australia who brought in elements of their particular adaptive leadership development approach, which was great.
  • 1557Working interculturally – leading interculturally in this space (ochre) isn’t about ignoring or dismissing history, cultural space. But it is about being intentional, skilled, and committed to coming together and making it workDesert Leadership is attempting to craft new ways for Aboriginal and other Australians to think and act in their leadership.
  • Understanding self and other is a key component, and here’s one of the tools we use.
  • And here they are.
  • And here they are.A great thing about this was the way the very diverse group worked together, and the cross school community-based approach was very successful.
  • Innovations in Intercultural leadership

    1. 1. Innovations in Intercultural LeadershipThe Alice Springs Desert Leadership Program John Huigen CEO Desert Knowledge Australia
    2. 2. Working harder at old ‘solutions’ won’t work
    3. 3. New thinking new language new approaches needed
    4. 4. A new type of leadership needed
    5. 5. The peculiarity of desert /remote Australia Desert Knowledge Australia DKA Strategy Desert Leadership Guiding principles Intercultural leadership…and consequences Impact and opportunity
    6. 6. Discrete Indigenous CommunitiesAustralian Standard Geographical ClassificationRemoteness Structure 2001
    7. 7. Desert Knowledge Movement• Began late ’90s in Alice SpringsKey ideas: – Desert knowledge has value • New economies (knowledge economy) – Holistic (commercial, social, environmental) – Actively bring Aboriginal and other Australians together (new ways needed) – Whole-of-desert (cross jurisdictional) – Partnership & network model (partnerships not power) – Public/Private/Government partnerships essential
    8. 8. What do we actually do? (and why?) DREAM DETERMINE DECIDE DO Harmony = Social health Sustainability = Environmental sustainability Wealth creation = Prosperity
    9. 9. CLIMATE VARIABILITY: LIMITED LIVELIHOODS:Variability and extremes in primary Lack of diverse small business drivers (rainfall, other weather) and livelihood options SCARCE RESOURCES: SCARCE CAPITAL: Widespread low soil fertility and Low levels of financial, physical patchy natural resources and human investment SPARSE POPULATION: Sparse, mobile and patchy human population OBN REMOTENESS: Desert Leadership Distant markets, business, political centres, mental models LOCAL KNOWLEDGE: CULTURAL DIFFERENCES: Limited research, local/traditional Particular types of knowledge more important people, cultures and institutions remoteFOCUS SOCIAL UNCERTAINTY: Unpredictability in or lack of control Science of over markets, labour, policy Desert Living Program Stafford Smith & Huigen, 2009
    10. 10. Why? The need and challenge
    11. 11. An initiative of… In partnership with…
    12. 12. Approach
    13. 13. The team
    14. 14. Five guiding principles
    15. 15. Guiding principle 1: Intercultural
    16. 16. Cultural Interaction Paradigm © Mark Yettica-Paulson
    17. 17. Guiding principle 2: Systemic Science of Desert Living Program Stafford Smith & Huigen, 2009
    18. 18. UNPREDICTABLE CLIMATE: LIMITED LIVELIHOODS:Variability and extremes in primary Lack of diverse small business drivers (rainfall, other weather) and livelihood options SCARCE RESOURCES: SCARCE CAPITAL: Patchy natural resources and Low levels of financial, physical widespread low soil fertility and human investment SPARSE POPULATION: Sparse, mobile and patchy human population REMOTENESS: Distant markets, business, political centres, mental models LOCAL KNOWLEDGE: CULTURAL DIFFERENCES: Limited research, local/tradit - Particular types of people, ional knowledge more important cultures and institutions SOCIAL UNCERTAINTY: Unpredictability in or lack of control over markets, labour, policy
    19. 19. Guiding principle 3: Ethics and values
    20. 20. Vectors of Leadership/Dispositions - Synthesis vs. Analysis• Synthesis • Analysis• Building • Dissecting Logistical Strategic Tactical Diplomatic • Analysis • Synthesis • Separating • Holding Vector Ethics© Thwaites & Bartos 2007
    21. 21. Guiding principle 4:Enabling language Enabling language
    22. 22. Guiding principle 5:Action/learning Action/learning
    23. 23. Program 1: Adult Desert Leadership
    24. 24. Program partner sponsors Corporate sponsorin partnership with Place sponsor Place co-sponsors
    25. 25. Program 2: Youth Desert Leadership
    26. 26. in partnership with Sponsored by
    27. 27. Impact • Evaluation • Immediate anecdotal – individual • Group… • Community…
    28. 28. What next?
    29. 29. Contact:John HuigenCEODesert Knowledge AustraliaPh: (08) 8959 6009john.huigen@desertknowledge.com.auwww.desertknowledge.com.au/desertleadership

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