DERYA AGIS
9/16/2013 1Derya Agis
 In this study, I am going to analyze
some Judeo-Spanish idioms and
proverbs that express the
importance of wealth and he...
 The data include 200
Judeo-Spanish idioms
and proverbs that
praise wealth and
health
 Beki Bardavid, Komer i
Bever, Ref...
 We would like to discover whether the concept
of bread indicates more richness than health
metaphorically in the Sephard...
 More Judeo-Spanish
idioms and proverbs
express health than
wealth by employing
the food of bread.
9/16/2013 5Derya Agis
 For testing the hypotheses, the percentages of
the proverbs and idioms that include the same
facial sensory body parts i...
 Conceptual blending or conceptual integration
is a process that occurs in our mind when we
compare two different situati...
9/16/2013 8Derya Agis
 Trayeme un pan kayente, metemelo en frente, ke por el
puedra curar.
Bring me a hot bread, put it to my front so that it ...
 Pan has
Pure bread
 Pan i agua i alegria en el korason
Bread and water and happiness in the heart
 Pan i agua i repozo...
Bread = earning, necessary food, tender person
Soft = tender, kind, nice
Healthy = healthy life
Sacred = divine
Spiritual ...
 A buena ambre no ay pan duro
There is no hard bread for a good hunger
 Ande entra pan no entra mal.
There is no badness...
 Kedar pan bayat
To become bread that is not fresh (a person who has
never got married)
 La pasensia es pan i sensia.
Pa...
“There are numerous explanations behind the meaning of matza. One is historical:
Passover is a commemoration of the exodus...
9/16/2013 Derya Agis 15
“"Bread...is the most important food in the Jewish diet," writes Maggie Glezer in
her book A Bless...
 A pan de kinze dias, ambre de tres semanas
To a fifteen-year-old bread, hunger for three weeks
 Bivir / Mantenerse kon ...
Percentages Difference 95% CI Chi-
Square
df p-value
Health Wealth
67.5%
n=135
32.5%
n=65
35% 21.14
to
48.86
20.428 1 P <
...
Fauconnier, G. & Turner, M. (1998). “Conceptual
Integration Networks.” Cognitive Science 22:
2, pp. 133-187.
http://www.ep...
THANK YOU
deryaagis@gmail.com
9/16/2013 Derya Agis 19
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Agis, Derya. May 7 – 8, 2008. “Cognitive Semiotic Approaches to the Concept of Bread in Judeo-Spanish Idioms and Proverbs.” An International Symposium: Cognitive Approaches to the Concept of Food in the Mediterranean Cultures, Kyrenia, Girne Ameri

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Agis, Derya. May 7 – 8, 2008. “Cognitive Semiotic Approaches to the Concept of Bread in Judeo-Spanish Idioms and Proverbs.” An International Symposium: Cognitive Approaches to the Concept of Food in the Mediterranean Cultures, Kyrenia, Girne American University, Turkish Republic of North Cyprus. (head of the organizing committee)

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Agis, Derya. May 7 – 8, 2008. “Cognitive Semiotic Approaches to the Concept of Bread in Judeo-Spanish Idioms and Proverbs.” An International Symposium: Cognitive Approaches to the Concept of Food in the Mediterranean Cultures, Kyrenia, Girne Ameri

  1. 1. DERYA AGIS 9/16/2013 1Derya Agis
  2. 2.  In this study, I am going to analyze some Judeo-Spanish idioms and proverbs that express the importance of wealth and health by employing the food of bread within the framework of the Conceptual Blending Theory developed by Fauconnier and Turner (1998) in order to interpret metaphors and metonymies correctly. The Chi- Square test results indicate that the bread is used in order to express wealth more than health in Judeo- Spanish idioms and proverbs for social and cultural reasons.  Main Reference Fauconnier, G. & Turner, M. (1998). “Conceptual Integration Networks.” Cognitive Science 22: 2, pp. 133-187. 9/16/2013 2Derya Agis
  3. 3.  The data include 200 Judeo-Spanish idioms and proverbs that praise wealth and health  Beki Bardavid, Komer i Bever, Refranos i dichas por el Komer (in preparation) 9/16/2013 3Derya Agis
  4. 4.  We would like to discover whether the concept of bread indicates more richness than health metaphorically in the Sephardic culture.  Besides, we wish to analyze the socio-cultural reasons of this.  For this reason, we refer to the Conceptual Blending Theory. 9/16/2013 4Derya Agis
  5. 5.  More Judeo-Spanish idioms and proverbs express health than wealth by employing the food of bread. 9/16/2013 5Derya Agis
  6. 6.  For testing the hypotheses, the percentages of the proverbs and idioms that include the same facial sensory body parts in both languages were calculated and confronted with a test of comparison of proportions with the statistical tool “MedCalc” available at the following web site: http://www.medcalc.be.  The statistical test significance test level is 5 percent in accordance with this tool. 9/16/2013 6Derya Agis
  7. 7.  Conceptual blending or conceptual integration is a process that occurs in our mind when we compare two different situations :  Theory developed by Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner 9/16/2013 7Derya Agis
  8. 8. 9/16/2013 8Derya Agis
  9. 9.  Trayeme un pan kayente, metemelo en frente, ke por el puedra curar. Bring me a hot bread, put it to my front so that it heals.  Tener el pan asigurado To have a guaranteed bread  Pan yorado Cried bread: bread obtained unwillingly  Pan kon sal Bread with salt  Pan kon azete i asukar Bread with vinegar and sugar  Pan i kezo i un buen bezo Bread and cheese and a good kiss 9/16/2013 9Derya Agis
  10. 10.  Pan has Pure bread  Pan i agua i alegria en el korason Bread and water and happiness in the heart  Pan i agua i repozo Bread and water and rest  Pan de ayer, karne de oy, vino de un anyo, azen el ombre sano. Yesterday’s bread, today’s meat, one-year-old wine make the man healthy.  Pan de kaza. House bread 9/16/2013 10Derya Agis
  11. 11. Bread = earning, necessary food, tender person Soft = tender, kind, nice Healthy = healthy life Sacred = divine Spiritual = spiritual well-being Hot = healthy Fresh = healthy 9/16/2013 11Derya Agis
  12. 12.  A buena ambre no ay pan duro There is no hard bread for a good hunger  Ande entra pan no entra mal. There is no badness in a place the bread enters.  El amor es dulse kon el pan Love is sweet with bread  El pan fresko se va komo fruta Fresh bread is sold like fruits 9/16/2013 12Derya Agis
  13. 13.  Kedar pan bayat To become bread that is not fresh (a person who has never got married)  La pasensia es pan i sensia. Patience is bread and sense.  La salud es el pan de la alma Health is the bread of the soul  Vende komo se vende el pan kayente To be sold like the hot bread 9/16/2013 13Derya Agis
  14. 14. “There are numerous explanations behind the meaning of matza. One is historical: Passover is a commemoration of the exodus from Egypt. The biblical narrative relates that the Israelites left Egypt in such haste, they could not wait for their bread dough to rise. The resulting product was matza. (Exodus 12:39). The other reason for eating matza is symbolic: On the one hand, matza symbolizes redemption and freedom, but it is also (lechem oni), "poor man's bread." Thus it serves as a reminder to be humble, and to not forget what life was like in servitude. Eating the "bread of affliction" is both a lesson in humility and an act that enhances one's appreciation of freedom. Another explanation is that matzah has been used to replace the pesach, or the traditional Passover offering that was made before the destruction of the Temple cult. During the Seder the third time the matzah is eaten it is preceded with the Sefardic rite, “zekher l’korban pesach hane’ekhal al hasova.” This means, “Remembrance of the Passover offering, eaten while full.” This last piece of the matzah eaten is called afikoman and many explain it as a symbol of salvation in the future. Bread was often a symbol of salvation in ancient Israel. This is related to the idea that the Garden of Eden was fertile with bread trees. The benediction over bread was, “motsi lechem min ha’arets,” meaning, “brings forth bread from the earth.” This implies “that in the future He will bring forth bread from the earth,” or the paradise of the Garden of Eden will be restored. After the Temple cult, sometime in the first century, the saving symbolism of bread was applied to matzah. Matzah became a substitute for the pesach because bread was already a symbol of salvation in the Jewish community” (“Matzo,” Meaning, 2008). 9/16/2013 Derya Agis 14
  15. 15. 9/16/2013 Derya Agis 15 “"Bread...is the most important food in the Jewish diet," writes Maggie Glezer in her book A Blessing of Bread: Recipes and Rituals, Memories and Mitzvahs. "Jewish law says that as long as bread is served, the fare offered constitutes a meal." At every meal, observant Jews break a piece off a loaf and recite a special prayer, called "hamotzi," before eating it. "Making a motzi," as the process is called, is one of the central rituals of daily life. For the Sabbath and holidays, Ashkenazi (European) Jews bake a special bread called challah, a rich, golden loaf that's related to Russian/Polish/Ukrainian babka and Easter breads such as Greek tsoureki and Italian pane di pasqua. According to Glezer, challah "seems to have originated in Germany, probably in the 15th century, with Jewish housewives copying their gentile neighbors' braided Sunday loaves." The soft, eggy dough is often shaped into elaborate braids, brushed with an egg wash to produce a shiny crust, and sprinkled with poppy seeds to represent biblical manna from heaven. On Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, challah takes on an extra significance. Representing hopes for "a sweet new year," the dough is studded with raisins, and pieces are dipped in honey before being eaten. Munching on these delicious morsels, celebrants pray that God will bestow on them a fate as pleasant as the bread's flavor. The bread becomes a tangible symbol of the holiday's deeper meaning” (Epicureous, 2008). In this study, I intend to examine the use of the words of bread, water, and milk in different Judeo-Spanish proverbs and idioms from the [1] Geert Hofstede. Culture’s Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values. Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA, 1984. [2] Geert Hofstede. Culture's Consequences, Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations across Nations. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks CA, 2001. [3] Geert Hofstede and Gert-Jan Hofstede. Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2004.
  16. 16.  A pan de kinze dias, ambre de tres semanas To a fifteen-year-old bread, hunger for three weeks  Bivir / Mantenerse kon pan i agua (ser muy prove) To live with bread and water  En este echo ay pan / no ay pan In this work, there is no bread  En ora de ambre no ay mal pan During hunger there is no bad bread Este pan para este kezo This bread for this cheese  Largo komo un dia sin pan As long as a day without bread  Vender / Merkar por un bokado de pan To sell for a piece of bread BREAD = ESSENTIAL FOOD = SURVIVAL = NECESSARY ECONOMIC WELFARE 9/16/2013 16Derya Agis
  17. 17. Percentages Difference 95% CI Chi- Square df p-value Health Wealth 67.5% n=135 32.5% n=65 35% 21.14 to 48.86 20.428 1 P < 0.0001 9/16/2013 Derya Agis 17
  18. 18. Fauconnier, G. & Turner, M. (1998). “Conceptual Integration Networks.” Cognitive Science 22: 2, pp. 133-187. http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/holi days/highholydays/challah http://www.jewfaq.org/holidaya.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matzo 9/16/2013 Derya Agis 18
  19. 19. THANK YOU deryaagis@gmail.com 9/16/2013 Derya Agis 19

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