Watershed Science - The Upper Grand River

1,518 views

Published on

Watershed Science - The Upper Grand River, by David P. Lusch, PhD, GISP of Remote Sensing & GIS Research and Outreach Services (RS&GIS), Michigan State University. Presented as part of a Watershed Management Short Course, March 2007.

Published in: Technology, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,518
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
32
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Watershed Science - The Upper Grand River

  1. 1. WATERSHED SCIENCE •  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Senior Research Specialist  •  Michigan State University  ­ Remote Sensing & GIS, GEOGRAPHY  ­ Institute of Water Research  •  http://www.rsgis.msu.edu/datadocs.htmDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  1/ 78
  2. 2. Watersheds•  A watershed is a geographic area in  which water (surface runoff, lakes and  streams) drains to a common outlet.  ­  Because of the integrated nature of natural  drainage systems (i.e., smaller tributaries  joining to form larger streams), watersheds  form a nested hierarchy of areas (i.e.,  smaller watersheds subdivide larger  watersheds). David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  2/ 78
  3. 3. Watersheds•  The watershed of any hydrographic  feature (lake, stream or wetland) is the  surface area that contributes overland  flow (runoff) to the feature.  ­  In most landscapes, the surface watershed  corresponds with the subsurface watershed  which contributes interflow and  groundwater discharge. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  3/ 78
  4. 4. WatershedsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  4/ 78
  5. 5. WatershedsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  5/ 78
  6. 6. Watersheds Grand River watershed within  the Lake Michigan watershed  The Upper Grand River  watershed extends farther east  than any other component  of the Lake Michigan watershedDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  6/ 78
  7. 7. Watersheds  Grand River watershedDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  7/ 78
  8. 8. Watersheds  Grand River watershedDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  8/ 78
  9. 9. Watersheds Topographic Elevation 640 ft  830 ft  1140 ft David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  9/ 78
  10. 10. Watersheds  Bedrock Surface ElevationDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  10/ 78
  11. 11. Grand River headwaters Watersheds Sections 19 & 20,  Sections 19 & 20,  Sumerset Twp, Hillsdale County Sumerset Twp, Hillsdale County David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  11/ 78
  12. 12. Grand River headwaters Watersheds (down­valley view)David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  12/ 78
  13. 13. Grand River headwaters Watersheds (down­valley view)David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  13/ 78
  14. 14. Grand River headwaters WatershedsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  14/ 78
  15. 15. Grand River headwaters WatershedsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  15/ 78
  16. 16. Watersheds Grand River – SW Ingham Co.David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  16/ 78
  17. 17. Watersheds Grand River – SW Clinton Co.David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  17/ 78
  18. 18. Watersheds Mouth of the Upper Grand RiverDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  18/ 78
  19. 19. Watersheds•  To appreciate the diverse valley forms  of the Grand River and to explain why it  winds across south­central Michigan  with several large meander bends, we  need a quick review of the recent earth  history of the area.  ­  Let’s pick up the story as the last ice age  14  comes to a close, about 15,500 C  yrs  ago. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  19/ 78
  20. 20. 14  15,500 C  years ago  Watersheds  l W isiso onsin    c nsin cW estsCCentral W ­ entra W e t­   oo Ca az lh ou m n la Ka h  ep J os Branch  Cass  S t.  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  20/ 78
  21. 21. 14  14,800 C  years ago  Watersheds  in   in is onns   t tral Wiscco s eenral WW st t­C nW ees­C   oo az Calhoun  Jackson m la Ka   ph Cass  se Branch  .  Jo St David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  21/ 78
  22. 22. WatershedsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  22/ 78
  23. 23. 14  14,700 C  years ago Watersheds David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  23/ 78
  24. 24. SE Michigan Interlobate Crease Watersheds  14  Ice margin 14,700 C 14 years ago  Ice margin 14,700 C  years ago David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  24/ 78
  25. 25. SE Michigan Interlobate Zone  Watersheds  14  Ice margin 14,700 C 14 years ago Ice margin 14,700 C  years ago David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  25/ 78
  26. 26. 14  Interlobate drainage 14,700 C  years ago  Watersheds  Early  Kalamazoo R.David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  26/ 78
  27. 27. 14  Interlobate drainage 14,500 C  years ago  Watersheds  Major headwaters of the  Major headwaters of the  Jackson Co. reach of the  Jackson Co. reach of the  Grand R. is the  Grand R. is the  Portage River Portage River  Early Kalamazoo R. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  27/ 78
  28. 28. 14  Interlobate drainage 14,400 C  years ago  Watersheds  Early  Huron R.  Major headwaters of the  Major headwaters of the  Jackson Co. reach of the  Jackson Co. reach of the  Early  Grand R. is the  Grand R. is the  Portage River Portage River Kalamazoo R. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  28/ 78
  29. 29. 14  Interlobate drainage 14,400 C  years ago  Watersheds  Early  Huron R.  Ann Arbor – Pinkney  Ann Arbor – Pinkney  segment of the Huron R.  segment of the Huron R.  Early  is flowing opposite of its  is flowing opposite of its  modern course modern course Kalamazoo R. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  29/ 78
  30. 30. 14  Interlobate drainage 14,300 C  years ago  Watersheds  Early Red  Cedar R.  Early  Huron R.  Ann Arbor – Pinkney  Ann Arbor – Pinkney  segment of the Huron R.  segment of the Huron R.  Early  is now flowing toward  is now flowing toward  Ann Arbor, as it does today Ann Arbor, as it does today Kalamazoo R. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  30/ 78
  31. 31. 14  Interlobate drainage 14,300 C  years ago  Watersheds  Early Red  Cedar R.  Early  Huron R.  Early  At Ann Arbor, this stage of  At Ann Arbor, this stage of Kalamazoo R.  the Huron R. flows SW  the Huron R. flows SW  along the ice margin, spilling  along the ice margin, spilling  into Glacial Lake Maumee into Glacial Lake Maumee David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  31/ 78
  32. 32. 14  Interlobate drainage 13,850 C  years ago  Watersheds  The major flow is along  The major flow is along  the ice margin from  the ice margin from  the Flint area the Flint area  Early  Thornapple R.  Early  The Upper Grand R.  The Upper Grand R.  flows as it does today  flows as it does today  Kalamazoo R. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  32/ 78
  33. 33. 14  Interlobate drainage 13,850 C  years ago  Watersheds  The Looking Glass and  The Looking Glass and  Red Cedar rivers flow  Red Cedar rivers flow  as they do today  as they do today  Early  Thornapple R.  The Huron R.  The Huron R.  flows as it does  flows as it does  today past  today past  Early  Ann Arbor Ann Arbor  Kalamazoo R. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  33/ 78
  34. 34. Hydrologic Cycle • Precipitation  • Evapotranspiration  • Surface depression storage  • Runoff  • Infiltration (recharge)  • Groundwater storage and flowDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  34/ 78
  35. 35. Hydrologic CycleDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  35/ 78
  36. 36. Hydrologic Cycle • Infiltration  ­ Infiltration capacity  decreases with the  duration of the storm  ­ Runoff ONLY  occurs when rainfall  intensity exceeds the  infiltration capacityDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  36/ 78
  37. 37. Hydrologic CycleRecharge = Rain – Evaporation – Runoff David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  37/ 78
  38. 38. Hydrologic Cycle• Precipitation:  32”– 34” • Evapotranspiration:  20” ­ 26” • Runoff:  3” • Recharge (Infiltration):  5” – 9”David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  38/ 78
  39. 39. Hydrologic Cycle Annual Precipitation  33”  30”  33” In southern Lower Michigan, annual  33” precipitation declines along a NE­trending  36” gradient. 39”  36”  39”  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  39/ 78
  40. 40. Recharge to the  Hydrologic Cycle  water­table aquifer http://gwmap.rsgis.msu.edu/ No recharge estimates due to lack of data  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  40/ 78
  41. 41. Recharge to the  Hydrologic Cycle  water­table aquifer http://gwmap.rsgis.msu.edu/ David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  41/ 78
  42. 42. Hydrologic Cycle  Baseflow •  The baseflow of a river is the amount  of groundwater discharged from an  aquifer into the watercourse. − This discharge occurs year­round, but fluctuates  seasonally depending on the level of the water in  the aquifer. − The baseflow of a river is supplemented by direct  runoff during and immediately after precipitation  or snowmelt events. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  42/ 78
  43. 43. Hydrologic Cycle  Baseflow cfs = cubic feet per second David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  43/ 78
  44. 44. Hydrologic Cycle  Baseflow Grand R. @ Goose lake  1.2 cfs Grand R. @ Grand Lake  12 cfs Grand R. @ Vandercook Lake  43 cfs Grand R. @ Jackson  116 cfs Grand R. @ (below Portage R.)  249 cfs Grand R. @ Eaton Rapids  435 cfs Grand R. @ Lansing (above Red Cedar R.)  496 cfs Grand R. @ Lansing (below Red Cedar R.)  763 cfs Grand R. @ Grand Ledge  800 cfs Grand R. @ Portland (above Looking Glass R.)  866 cfs David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  44/ 78
  45. 45. Sources of Water in Streams • Overland Flow  • Interflow  • Baseflow (groundwater discharge)  • Direct precipitation in channelDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  45/ 78
  46. 46. Sources of Water in Streams Precipitation  ET  Overland Flow  (runoff)  Soil Moisture  Water table Infiltration  Groundwater  Interflow  Groundwater  flow David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  46/ 78
  47. 47. Channel Flow•  Perennial, Intermittent & Ephemeral  Streams  Wet season  water table  Ephemeral  Intermittent  Perennial  Dry season  water table Ephemeral stream  Intermittent stream  Perennial stream  Ephemeral flow zone  Intermittent flow zone  Perennial flow zone  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  47/ 78
  48. 48. Channel Flow  Ephemeral  Streams Perennial  Stream  Intermittent  Stream David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  48/ 78
  49. 49. Stream Hydrographs• Stream discharge (volume/time) at a  single location as a function of time • Annual Hydrograph  ­ note baseflow recession • Storm Hydrograph  ­ Lag time  ­ Peak discharge  ­ Rising/Falling limb; RecessionDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  49/ 78
  50. 50. Stream HydrographsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  50/ 78
  51. 51. Stream HydrographsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  51/ 78
  52. 52. Stream HydrographsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  52/ 78
  53. 53. Stream HydrographsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  53/ 78
  54. 54. Influence of Development • Produces greater volume of runoff -increases the coefficient of runoff -decreases infiltration  (limiting groundwater recharge)  • Increases delivery rate of runoff  ­ increases the drainage density  ­ faster channel flow in ditches and  storm sewers (compared to natural  channels)David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  54/ 78
  55. 55. Influence of DevelopmentDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  55/ 78
  56. 56. Influence of Development•  Polluted runoff is now widely recognized  by environmental scientists and  regulators as the single largest threat to  water quality in the United States (non­  point source pollution). •  Urban stormwater management is a  critical component of watershed  management.David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  56/ 78
  57. 57. Influence of Development > 25% 12% ­ 15% David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  57/ 78
  58. 58. Influence of DevelopmentDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  58/ 78
  59. 59. Influence of Development From: Wyckoff, Manning, Olsson & Riggs. 2003. How Much Development is Too Much?  Huron River Watershed Council. Ann Arbor, Michigan, 71p.David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  59/ 78
  60. 60. Influence of DevelopmentDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  60/ 78
  61. 61. Influence of DevelopmentThe Guidebook may be  downloaded from: http://www.hrwc.org/text/  research.htm#imp Copies of a CD­ROM of  appendices (sample ordinances and Master  Plan language) are  available from the  HRWC. Shipping and  handling charges  apply. Contact HRWC  at 734 / 769­5123 for  details. David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  61/ 78
  62. 62. Influence of Development http://nemo.uconn.eduDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  62/ 78
  63. 63. Channel Pattern •  Meandering  •  Length of straight­channel reaches  rarely exceed 10 times channel width  ­  e.g., for a 40 ft.­wide stream, straight  reaches will usually be less than 400 ft.  long.  •  Thalweg -line of maximum depth & velocity -as the thalweg becomes sinuous, a  Pool­Riffle sequence developsDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  63/ 78
  64. 64. Channel Pattern •  Thalweg – “the fast­flow tube”David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  64/ 78
  65. 65. Pool and Riffle Sequence Pool  Bar  Bar Riffle  Bar  Bar  Pool  Thalweg  Thalweg David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  65/ 78
  66. 66. Pool and Riffle Sequence • Pools  ­ Deeper water  ­ Fine­textured bed sediments  ­ Low water­surface slope  ­ At apex of thalweg curvature  ­ Scoured at high discharges  ­ Pool to pool spacing is 5 ­ 7 times  the channel widthDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  66/ 78
  67. 67. Pool and Riffle SequenceDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  67/ 78
  68. 68. Pool and Riffle Sequence• Riffles  ­ Shallower water  ­ Coarse­textured bed sediments  ­ Higher water­surface slope  ­ At inflection point of sinuous thalweg  ­ Scoured at low flows David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  68/ 78
  69. 69. Pool and Riffle SequenceDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  69/ 78
  70. 70. Flow Components in Meanders•  Super­elevation of water on outside  of meander •  Velocity increases toward outside  of meander •  Increased shear stress on bed at  outside  of meander due to increased  depth •  Helical flow pattern (down at outside;  up at inside of meander)David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  70/ 78
  71. 71. Flow Components in Meanders Helical flow pattern  (Thalweg) (down at outside;  up at inside of meander)  Super­elevation of water  on outside of meander David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  71/ 78
  72. 72. Stream Sediment Movement • Function of  ­ sediment particle size  ­ stream bed velocity  •  Graphically depicted by the  Hjulstrom diagramDavid P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  72/ 78
  73. 73. Stream Sediment Movement Clay  Silt  Sand  Gravel vfs  fs  ms  cs  vcs  granule  pebble David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  73/ 78
  74. 74. Stream Sediment Movement  USGS Field Measurements – Grand River at Jackson, MI  Velocity (cm/sec) Mean  36.8 Median  36.1 Mode  36.3  +/­ s = 23.1 – 50.5 cm/sec  68.2 % of the timeStnd. Deviation  13.7 Range  65.5 Minimum  11.6 Maximum  77.1  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  74/ 78
  75. 75. Stream Sediment Movement50.5 36.8 23.1 Clay  Silt  Sand  Gravel  vfs  fs  ms  cs  vcs  granule  pebble  David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed Management RS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  75/ 78
  76. 76. Floodplains  Floodplain  Floodplain  of the river River  Cross­section of a river valley  showing the floodplain David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  76/ 78
  77. 77. Floodplains  Floodplain  Terrace River  Cross­section of a river valley  showing the floodplain  Terrace of the Glacial  St. Joseph River David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  77/ 78
  78. 78. WATERSHED HYDROLOGY The   End David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP Senior Research Specialist lusch@msu.edu Michigan State University  Remote Sensing and GIS Research and Outreach Services,  Dept. of Geography  Institute of Water Research David P. Lusch, Ph.D., GISP  Watershed ManagementRS&GIS­GEOG and IWR, MSU  Short Course  78/ 78

×