COSEE Great Lakes:  Scientists Who Have Made a Difference and Broadened ImpactsSteve Stewart,M.S.Senior District Extension...
Introduction<br /><ul><li> Michigan Sea Grant
Education Program Co-lead
Director, Great Lakes Education Program
Director, Summer Discovery Cruises
 COSEE Great Lakes
 Michigan’s COSEE GL lead
 Lake Huron lead
 Teaching with Great Lakes                            	Data lead</li></ul>2  / 24<br />
Introduction<br />A primary COSEE Great Lakes Objective<br />Facilitate collaboration between scientists and educators: <b...
 assist scientists in education and public outreach</li></ul>3  / 24<br />
2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />4  / 24<br />
2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />5  / 24<br />
2008 Great Lakes Rock!<br />2008 Great Lakes Rock! Online Workshop<br />Excellent presentation, Dr. Lusch.  I think I have...
2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />7  / 24<br />
2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />8  / 24<br />
Standards and Principles<br /><ul><li>Science Education Standards
 To be effective in working with teachers, scientists  must become informed about the content expectations in science clas...
Standards and Principles<br /><ul><li>Great Lakes Literacy (the goal of COSEE-GL)
A Great Lakes literate person:
 understands the essential principles and fundamental concepts about the characteristics, functioning and value of the Gre...
 can communicate accurately about the Great Lakes’ influence on systems and people in and beyond their watershed; and
 is able to make informed and responsible decisions regarding the Great Lakes and the resources of their watershed.</li></...
Great Lakes Literacy Principles<br />11  / 24<br />
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COSEE Great Lakes: Scientists Who Have Made a Difference and Broadened Impacts

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The primary objective of the COSEE Great Lakes program is to facilitate collaboration between scientists and educators by enhancing teacher capabilities in Great Lakes/ocean science and to assist scientists in education and public outreach. Presented at IAGLR Annual Meeting, Duluth, MN, June 2, 2011.

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COSEE Great Lakes: Scientists Who Have Made a Difference and Broadened Impacts

  1. 1. COSEE Great Lakes:  Scientists Who Have Made a Difference and Broadened ImpactsSteve Stewart,M.S.Senior District Extension Sea Grant EducatorSenior Investigator, COSEE Great LakesMichigan Sea Grant ExtensionDavid P. Lusch,Ph.D.Distinguished Senior Research SpecialistDepartment of GeographyMichigan State University<br />
  2. 2. Introduction<br /><ul><li> Michigan Sea Grant
  3. 3. Education Program Co-lead
  4. 4. Director, Great Lakes Education Program
  5. 5. Director, Summer Discovery Cruises
  6. 6. COSEE Great Lakes
  7. 7. Michigan’s COSEE GL lead
  8. 8. Lake Huron lead
  9. 9. Teaching with Great Lakes Data lead</li></ul>2 / 24<br />
  10. 10. Introduction<br />A primary COSEE Great Lakes Objective<br />Facilitate collaboration between scientists and educators: <br /><ul><li> enhance teacher capabilities in Great Lakes/ocean science
  11. 11. assist scientists in education and public outreach</li></ul>3 / 24<br />
  12. 12. 2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />4 / 24<br />
  13. 13. 2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />2007 Lake Huron Exploration Workshop<br />5 / 24<br />
  14. 14. 2008 Great Lakes Rock!<br />2008 Great Lakes Rock! Online Workshop<br />Excellent presentation, Dr. Lusch.  I think I have learned more during your 30 minutes than I have in any previous geology course!  Your analogies are wonderful, and I already plan on using them in the classroom.  Thank you for the offer of the use of your PowerPoint in the classroom.  I've already gone to your site & found more great resources there.  Thank you! <br />6 / 24<br />
  15. 15. 2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />7 / 24<br />
  16. 16. 2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />2009 Shipboard & Shoreline Science<br />8 / 24<br />
  17. 17. Standards and Principles<br /><ul><li>Science Education Standards
  18. 18. To be effective in working with teachers, scientists must become informed about the content expectations in science classrooms.</li></ul>9 / 24<br />
  19. 19. Standards and Principles<br /><ul><li>Great Lakes Literacy (the goal of COSEE-GL)
  20. 20. A Great Lakes literate person:
  21. 21. understands the essential principles and fundamental concepts about the characteristics, functioning and value of the Great Lakes;
  22. 22. can communicate accurately about the Great Lakes’ influence on systems and people in and beyond their watershed; and
  23. 23. is able to make informed and responsible decisions regarding the Great Lakes and the resources of their watershed.</li></ul>10 / 24<br />
  24. 24. Great Lakes Literacy Principles<br />11 / 24<br />
  25. 25. Great Lakes Literacy Principles<br /><ul><li>Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed
  26. 26. Ancient igneous and metamorphic rocks form portions of the upper Great Lakes basin. Most rocks underlying the present day Great Lakes and the surrounding watershed are sedimentary, and originated as deposits within shallow tropical seas that once covered the basin.
  27. 27. Most of the surficial sediments in Michigan were deposited and shaped during the advance and retreat of continental glaciers.</li></ul>12 / 24<br />
  28. 28. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br /><ul><li>Michigan Structural basin – like nested bowls</li></ul>13 / 24<br />
  29. 29. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br />Wisconsin<br />Dome<br />Pelee Is<br />Kelleys Is<br />Marblehead<br />Freemont<br /><ul><li>Bedrock structure in the Great Lakes Region</li></ul>I-80<br />Toledo<br />Thornton, IL<br />14 / 24<br />
  30. 30. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br /><ul><li>Niagaran Escarpment - the major resistant-rock (dolomite) landform in the Michigan Structural Basin.</li></ul>15 / 24<br />
  31. 31. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br />Rock Island, Wisconsin<br />16 / 24<br />
  32. 32. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br />Fayette State Park, Michigan<br />17 / 24<br />
  33. 33. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br />Bruce Peninsula, Ontario<br />Dip slope<br />Scarp<br />slope<br />N<br />18 / 24<br />
  34. 34. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br />Niagara Falls<br />Hwy 401<br />Lewiston, NY<br />19 / 24<br />
  35. 35. Great Lakes Literacy Principles<br /><ul><li>Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed
  36. 36. During the Ice Age, mile-thick sheets of ice covered the Great Lakes region multiple times, depressing the crust with their weight. Ancient beach ridges or wave-cut cliffs mark previous Great Lake shorelines. Since the glaciers retreated (about 10,000 years ago), the Earth’s crust has been adjusting upward in a process of isostatic rebound that continues today.</li></ul>20 / 24<br />
  37. 37. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br /><ul><li>ISOSTATIC REBOUND - With glacial melting, the tremendous weight of the ice was lifted from the North American Plate and the land surface, noticeably depressed during the glacial maximum, began to rebound upward. This process continues today in Michigan at a rate of about 7.5 cm per century.</li></ul>21 / 24<br />
  38. 38. Bring Concepts to Life with Examples<br />Algonquin 11,000 C14 yrs<br />184.4 m <br />Nipissing 4500 C14 yrs<br />184.4 m<br />Algonquin wave cliffs<br />51.8 m rise in 6500 yrs.<br />Nipissing wave cliff<br />Nipissing wave cliff<br /><ul><li>Isostatic rebound evidence</li></ul>Fort Mackinac, Mackinac Island, MI<br />22 / 24<br />
  39. 39. Involve classroom teachers<br /><ul><li>Do not attempt composing lesson plans without the active participation of classroom teachers
  40. 40. Always link your material to appropriate Grade Level Content Expectations
  41. 41. Provide opportunities for field testing the lesson plan materials before mass dissemination
  42. 42. Use appropriate/alternative technology within the lesson plan (not everyone has super-fast Internet access)</li></ul>23 / 24<br />
  43. 43. COSEE Great Lakes:  Scientists Who Have Made a Difference and Broadened Impacts<br />Questions?<br />Steve StewartMichigan Sea Grant Extension<br />stew@msu.eduDavid P. LuschMichigan State University<br />lusch@msu.edu<br />24 / 24<br />

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