<ul><li>By Derek Larsen </li></ul>By Derek Larsen Manpower Wellness Placement Student
<ul><li>‘ To put sitting into perspective, when you are standing up, each disc in your back is under 100 per cent of press...
Seminar successes <ul><li>understand the factors contributing to low back pain </li></ul><ul><li>become more aware of your...
Agenda <ul><li>‘ Back’ground </li></ul><ul><li>Causes </li></ul><ul><li>Anatomy </li></ul><ul><li>Being proactive </li></u...
<ul><li>Did you know? </li></ul><ul><li>The back is a well-designed structure made up of bone, ligaments, muscles, spongy ...
‘ Back’ground  <ul><li>Back disorders are the  most common  form of ill health at work </li></ul><ul><li>More than  80%   ...
Causes <ul><li>2 categories </li></ul><ul><li>Accidental </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unexpected event triggers injury </li></ul>...
The ‘backbone’ of non accidental injuries <ul><li>Applicable laws of muscle: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Muscles have antagonisti...
Anatomy of the usual suspects <ul><li>The 4 abdominal core muscles </li></ul><ul><li>Transverse </li></ul><ul><li>Internal...
<ul><li>Psoas Major </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hip flexion, straightens  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the spine, turns pelvis dow...
<ul><li>Glutes/Hamstrings </li></ul><ul><li>both function as </li></ul><ul><li>powerful hip flexors </li></ul><ul><li>and ...
Postural vs Phasic muscles Vastus Lateralis Vastus Medialis Gluteal Muscles Hamstrings Iliopsoas Rectus Femoris Adductors ...
<ul><li>Abdominals weaken due to lack of activation </li></ul><ul><li>Hip flexors, including the psoas and rectus femoris ...
Stretches for a limber Lumbar <ul><li>Psoas stretch </li></ul><ul><li>-rest your knee on an elevated  </li></ul><ul><li>su...
Exercises to end back pain <ul><li>Glute bridge </li></ul><ul><li>Lie flact, knees bent, exhale while  </li></ul><ul><li>e...
Resources <ul><li>http://www.spine-health.com/wellness/ergonomics/ergonomics-workplace-overview </li></ul><ul><li>http://w...
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Back Pain

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Back pain corporate health promotion lunch time presentation to bring issue awareness, education, and to offer strategies for effective management of the sometimes incapacitating condition prevalent in administrative workplace environments.

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Back Pain

  1. 1. <ul><li>By Derek Larsen </li></ul>By Derek Larsen Manpower Wellness Placement Student
  2. 2. <ul><li>‘ To put sitting into perspective, when you are standing up, each disc in your back is under 100 per cent of pressure. When you’re sitting, each disc is under 140 per cent of pressure. If you’re sitting and leaning forward, it’s 185 per cent,’ Kylie explains. ‘Lying on your back is only 25 per cent of pressure and on the side is 75 per cent. Lifting is 220 per cent.’ (http://nz.lifestyle.yahoo.com/b/new-idea-nz/1162/beat-back-pain-forever/) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>-healthy body can only tolerate staying in one position for about 20 minutes. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>-Holding the same position slowly diminishes elasticity in the soft tissues (muscles ligaments and tendons in the back </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep your head directly over the shoulders (i.e. “chest out, head back”) </li></ul><ul><li>* Keep the shoulders directly over the pelvis </li></ul><ul><li>Health Canada states that employees’ work performance can be improved by 4 -15 % through participation in regular physical activity. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Seminar successes <ul><li>understand the factors contributing to low back pain </li></ul><ul><li>become more aware of your body and relate this information to your situation </li></ul><ul><li>learn some techniques to both stretch and strengthen the underlying muscles to help alleviate the causal pain and stress that develops into back pain </li></ul>
  4. 4. Agenda <ul><li>‘ Back’ground </li></ul><ul><li>Causes </li></ul><ul><li>Anatomy </li></ul><ul><li>Being proactive </li></ul><ul><li>Stretches </li></ul><ul><li>Exercises </li></ul><ul><li>Questions </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Did you know? </li></ul><ul><li>The back is a well-designed structure made up of bone, ligaments, muscles, spongy material and nerves. </li></ul><ul><li>You rely on your back for nearly every move you make. </li></ul><ul><li>The lower portion of you back experiences more physical stress than any other part of your body. </li></ul><ul><li>As opposed to historical beliefs, the key to feeling recovering sooner following a back injury is to stay active </li></ul>
  6. 6. ‘ Back’ground <ul><li>Back disorders are the most common form of ill health at work </li></ul><ul><li>More than 80% of adults experience back pain at some point in their lives [1] </li></ul><ul><li>In Canada, back injuries account for 44% of work-related injuries that require time away from work. </li></ul><ul><li>Occurrence is most often between the ages of 30-50 years [2] </li></ul><ul><li>No specific cause can be identified in approximately 85% to 90% of individuals with back pain. [3] </li></ul>
  7. 7. Causes <ul><li>2 categories </li></ul><ul><li>Accidental </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unexpected event triggers injury </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Muscle or ligament strain, Spinal disc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>injury, Vertebral damage </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Non Accidental </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Poor body mechanics (such as slouching </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>in an office chair) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prolonged activity, repetitive motions, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>fatigue are major contributors to these injuries) </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. The ‘backbone’ of non accidental injuries <ul><li>Applicable laws of muscle: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Muscles have antagonistic muscle pairs to perform the opposite function </li></ul><ul><li>2. When a muscle is lengthened, it becomes weak </li></ul><ul><li>3. When a muscle is weak, functionally synergistic muscles must assist and risk becoming overworked </li></ul>
  9. 9. Anatomy of the usual suspects <ul><li>The 4 abdominal core muscles </li></ul><ul><li>Transverse </li></ul><ul><li>Internal and External </li></ul><ul><li>obliques </li></ul><ul><li>Rectus Abdominus </li></ul><ul><li>-Synergistically provide </li></ul><ul><li>Lower back stability in </li></ul><ul><li>addition to flexion of the </li></ul><ul><li>lumbar spine </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Psoas Major </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hip flexion, straightens </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the spine, turns pelvis down </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Iliacus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexes, laterally rotates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the hip, turns pelvis down </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Glutes/Hamstrings </li></ul><ul><li>both function as </li></ul><ul><li>powerful hip flexors </li></ul><ul><li>and are attached to </li></ul><ul><li>the hip bone </li></ul>
  12. 12. Postural vs Phasic muscles Vastus Lateralis Vastus Medialis Gluteal Muscles Hamstrings Iliopsoas Rectus Femoris Adductors Piriformis Tensor Fasciae Latae Thoracic Erector Spinae Rectus Abdominis Lumbar Erector Spinae Cervical Erector Spinae Quadratus Lumborum Prone to inhibition Fatigue-early Faulty loading-weakening Prone to hyperactivity Fatigue-late Faulty loading-shortening Phasic (movement) Postural (static)
  13. 13. <ul><li>Abdominals weaken due to lack of activation </li></ul><ul><li>Hip flexors, including the psoas and rectus femoris assist in maintaining upright posture </li></ul><ul><li>Psoas and rectus femoris become hyperactive and tighten </li></ul><ul><li>Pelvic muscles tighten, become dominant and pull on the lumbar spine </li></ul><ul><li>The increased lumbar curve causes PAIN </li></ul>The typical chain of events
  14. 14. Stretches for a limber Lumbar <ul><li>Psoas stretch </li></ul><ul><li>-rest your knee on an elevated </li></ul><ul><li>surface, shift weight to front leg </li></ul><ul><li>and lunge the hips forward, </li></ul><ul><li>holding for 15-30s </li></ul><ul><li>Piriformis stretch </li></ul><ul><li>-Rest lower leg on top of other </li></ul><ul><li>Knee, pull bottom leg towards </li></ul><ul><li>chest, holding for 15-30s </li></ul>
  15. 15. Exercises to end back pain <ul><li>Glute bridge </li></ul><ul><li>Lie flact, knees bent, exhale while </li></ul><ul><li>engaging core, push hips off the ground </li></ul><ul><li>slowly. Inhale and bring hips back to floor. </li></ul><ul><li>Perform 12-15 repetitions </li></ul><ul><li>Foot lift </li></ul><ul><li>Lie flat, knees bent, exhale while engaging </li></ul><ul><li>core and keeping the back stable, raise one foot a few inches off the </li></ul><ul><li>floor, keeping the knee bent. Inhale and bring your foot back to the floor. </li></ul><ul><li>Perform 12-15 repetitions </li></ul>
  16. 16. Resources <ul><li>http://www.spine-health.com/wellness/ergonomics/ergonomics-workplace-overview </li></ul><ul><li>http://www. medicalnewstoday .com/articles/10002. php </li></ul><ul><li>http://www. healthyalberta .com/HealthyPlaces/738. htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-619-m/2006003/4053542-eng.htm </li></ul><ul><li>1. Hicks GS, Duddleston DN, Russell LD, Holman HE, Shepherd JM, Brown A. Low back pain. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 2002; 324 (4): 207–211. </li></ul><ul><li>Wheeler AH, Stubbart JR, Hicks B. Pathophysiology of chronic back pain. eMedicine [Online]. Available at: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.emedicine.com/neuro/topic516. Accessed December 2004. </li></ul><ul><li>2. National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Low back pain fact sheet [Online]. Available at: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/backpain/detail_backpain.htm. Accessed December 2004. </li></ul><ul><li>3. van Tulder M, Koes B. Low back pain and sciatica: Chronic. Clin Evid 2002; 7: 1032–1048. </li></ul>

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