A New Paradigm for Mining in OntarioCCH Complimentary WebinarPresented by: Nalin Sahni24 January 2013Dentons Canada LLP
Speaker PanelSpeaker PanelNalin Sahni, B.Sc. (Eng.), M.E.M., J.D. Associate, Dentons Canada LLP•Practice focused on litiga...
The End of the Free Entry System:A New Paradigm for Mining in OntarioPresented by: Nalin Sahni24 January 2013Dentons Canad...
Driving Factors24 January 2013 5“Management of natural resources must take into account the rights andinterests of Aborigi...
Four Big Changes to Mining and Aboriginal Law24 January 2013 61. Ontario Mining Act Amendments and Regulations2. Far North...
Ontario Mining Act Amendments & Regulations24 January 2013 7• New Mining Act purpose clause:• mineral development “in a ma...
Far North Act, 201024 January 2013 8• Land use planning statute for the northernmost 42% of Ontario• Half of the 450,000 k...
Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 201224 January 2013 9• Federal role in assessing environmental impacts limited to a...
Mining Class Environmental Assessment24 January 2013 10• Applies to predictable and manageable impacts• Only applies to di...
New Paradigm for Mining in Ontario24 January 2013 11• End of the free entry system• Regulatory requirements for exploratio...
Questions?Nalin Sahni416 863 4463nalin.sahni@dentons.comDentons Canada LLP12
The preceding presentationcontains examples of the kinds ofissues mining companies couldface. If you are faced with one of...
A New Paradigm for Mining in Ontario
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

A New Paradigm for Mining in Ontario

678 views

Published on

On January 24, 2013, Dentons' Nalin Sahni presented "A New Paradigm for Mining in Ontario" during a complimentary mining webinar hosted by CCH. The presentation outlines changes to Mining and Aboriginal Law with a focus on the following:
- Ontario Mining Act Amendments and Regulations
- Far North Act, 2010
- Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 ("CEAA")
- Ontario Mining Class Environmental Assessment

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
678
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
268
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

A New Paradigm for Mining in Ontario

  1. 1. A New Paradigm for Mining in OntarioCCH Complimentary WebinarPresented by: Nalin Sahni24 January 2013Dentons Canada LLP
  2. 2. Speaker PanelSpeaker PanelNalin Sahni, B.Sc. (Eng.), M.E.M., J.D. Associate, Dentons Canada LLP•Practice focused on litigation and commercial transactions with complex environmental, energy, Aboriginal, and mining issues•Geological engineering degree and Masters in environmental managementCaroline ThomasChief Counsel, Exploration, Property & Aboriginal Affairs, Vale•Senior lawyer responsible for mineral rights, exploration projects, aboriginal relations and mineral reserve  and mineral reporting and estimation across Vale’s global base metals business•Spearheaded Vale’s development of standardized exploration documentation and approach in NANeal J SmithemanPartner, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP•Practices both civil and criminal litigation. His corporate commercial litigation practice results in frequent appearances on behalf of clients before the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and the Ontario Court of Appeal.•Chair of the Toronto Aboriginal Law Practice Group, advising and representing clients in this burgeoning area of legal specialty. 
  3. 3. The End of the Free Entry System:A New Paradigm for Mining in OntarioPresented by: Nalin Sahni24 January 2013Dentons Canada LLP
  4. 4. Driving Factors24 January 2013 5“Management of natural resources must take into account the rights andinterests of Aboriginal people more effectively. I believe there are ways ofsharing and co‐managing natural resources that are consistent withAboriginal and treaty rights while serving the interests of first nations andthe people of Ontario”.Justice Linden: Ipperwash InquiryDentons Canada LLP
  5. 5. Four Big Changes to Mining and Aboriginal Law24 January 2013 61. Ontario Mining Act Amendments and Regulations2. Far North Act, 20103. Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (“CEAA”)4. Ontario Mining Class Environmental AssessmentDentons Canada LLP
  6. 6. Ontario Mining Act Amendments & Regulations24 January 2013 7• New Mining Act purpose clause:• mineral development “in a manner consistent with the recognition and affirmation ofexisting Aboriginal and treaty rights in section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982,including the duty to consult” and to minimize health, safety and environmentalimpacts• Aboriginal consultation from start to finish• Mandatory prospectors awareness program• Notification for exploration plans (low impact activates)• Consultation on exploration permits (moderate impact activities) and posting onthe Environmental Registry• Consultation for closure plans• Required 3rd party mediation for ongoing disputes• Sites of Aboriginal cultural significance are withdrawn from claim staking• Continues downloading of Aboriginal consultation responsibilities fromgovernments to proponentsDentons Canada LLP
  7. 7. Far North Act, 201024 January 2013 8• Land use planning statute for the northernmost 42% of Ontario• Half of the 450,000 km2 far north will be an interconnected protectedarea off-limits to mining• Mining moratorium in each area until community-based land use plansare developed• For mining to occur it must be consistent with the land use plan developed forthe area• Plans must be agreed upon by all Band Councils in the area and theOntario Government• Only 4 plans have been developed thus far• Could be a long time before much of the far north is open to miningDentons Canada LLP
  8. 8. Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 201224 January 2013 9• Federal role in assessing environmental impacts limited to areas offederal jurisdiction• Strong promotion of Aboriginal involvement in the EA process• Aboriginal component to the purpose clause:“to promote communication and cooperation with aboriginal peopleswith respect to environmental assessments”• Community knowledge and Aboriginal traditional knowledge may betaken into account• New environmental effects on Aboriginal peoples that must beconsidered:1. Health and socio-economic conditions2. Physical and cultural heritage3. Historical and archeological sites• Environmental effects on Aboriginal peoples apply broadly acrossCanadaDentons Canada LLP
  9. 9. Mining Class Environmental Assessment24 January 2013 10• Applies to predictable and manageable impacts• Only applies to discretionary decisions of MNDM• Examples include: staking lands not generally open to claim staking,permission to test bulk samples on unpatented mining claim• Aboriginal consultation incorporated into the Class EA process• Projects in the far north may potentially require:1. Community-base land use plan2. Ontario Mining Class EA3. Federal EA under CEAA, 2012Dentons Canada LLP
  10. 10. New Paradigm for Mining in Ontario24 January 2013 11• End of the free entry system• Regulatory requirements for exploration in almost all circumstances• Exploration plans and permits must be applied for in advance and requireAboriginal notification / consultation• Aboriginal consultation firmly embedded in the mining cycle• Consultation requirements from early exploration to mine closure• Aboriginal consultation is at the core of CEAA and the Far North Act• Statutes Operationalize s. 35 of the Constitution but go beyondconstitutional requirements• Examples: no development in far north before development of communityplans, mandatory mediation under the Mining Act for Aboriginal consultationdisputes• Still a great deal of uncertainty for proponents• Expect ongoing demands for money for comprehensive archaeologicaland environmental studies, legal fees, and financial payments.Dentons Canada LLP
  11. 11. Questions?Nalin Sahni416 863 4463nalin.sahni@dentons.comDentons Canada LLP12
  12. 12. The preceding presentationcontains examples of the kinds ofissues mining companies couldface. If you are faced with one ofthese issues, please retainprofessional assistance as eachsituation is unique.Dentons Canada LLP13

×