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MISCONCEPTIONS
about HALITOSIS
MISCONCEPTIONS
Misconceptions exist in relation to halitosis, including:
1. Low prevalence
2. Aetiology: gastrointestinal ...
What is halitosis?
Halitosis, or bad breath, is defined as a set of
unpleasant or offensive odours that emanate
from the m...
Types of halitosis
Halitosis can be:
• Physiologic: when the bad odour originates on the tongue
dorsum.
• Oral pathologic:...
Causes
Mainly caused by the presence in the oral cavity of gases known
as volatile sulphur compounds (VSC):
Hydrogen sulph...
Signs and Symptoms
Halitosis of oral origin is characterised by the emission of gases
with an unpleasant odour. This odour...
Signs and Symptoms
• Gingivitis-associated halitosis: gums are red and bleed easily.
• Periodontitis-associated halitosis:...
Misconception1: Low Prevalence
Around 30% of the adult population is estimated to have or to
have had halitosis at some ti...
Misconception 2: Origin
Almost 90% of halitosis originates in the mouth. Only 13% is associated
with ENT-related problems ...
Misconception 3: No reference
practitioner exists
Halitosis or bad breath is a problem that originates in the oral
cavity....
Misconception 4: No solution
The TREATMENT of oral halitosis consists of:
1. Reducing the number of bacteria that produce ...
Daily Habits
• Caring for your oral hygiene:
– Brushing should be done 3 times a day for 2 minutes.
– Also use interdental...
Daily Habits
• Limit consumption of tobacco, coffee and alcohol. And foods
such as: garlic, onion,…
• Avoid using alcohol-...
Treatment
For PHYSIOLOGIC HALITOSIS:
1. Professional dental cleaning and polishing
2. Stress oral hygiene: besides toothbr...
Treatment
For ORAL PATHOLOGIC HALITOSIS:
Besides the above we would add:
5. Treating gum disease.
6. Treating all existing...
HALITA® doesn’t hide bad breath; it attacks the root of the problem*
*Roldán S, Herrera D, Santa-Cruz I, O’Connor A, Gonzá...
We recommend you visit the following web
pages:
www.halita.es
www.dentaid.es
http://blogsaludbucal.es/
For more information
Scientific Support
Rainer seemann, d.M.D., Ph.D.; Andi kison; Mozhgan bizhang, d.M.D., Ph.D.; Stefan Zimmer, d.M.D., Ph.D....
Misconceptions about Halitosis
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Misconceptions about Halitosis

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Misconceptions exist in relation to halitosis, including:
Low prevalence
Aetiology: gastrointestinal origin
No reference practitioner exists
It has no solution or treatment

In this presentation we will debunk these misconceptions...

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Misconceptions about Halitosis

  1. 1. MISCONCEPTIONS about HALITOSIS
  2. 2. MISCONCEPTIONS Misconceptions exist in relation to halitosis, including: 1. Low prevalence 2. Aetiology: gastrointestinal origin 3. No reference practitioner exists 4. It has no solution or treatment In this presentation we will debunk these misconceptions...
  3. 3. What is halitosis? Halitosis, or bad breath, is defined as a set of unpleasant or offensive odours that emanate from the mouth.
  4. 4. Types of halitosis Halitosis can be: • Physiologic: when the bad odour originates on the tongue dorsum. • Oral pathologic: When it is caused by some form of gum disease: gingivitis or periodontitis. • Extraoral pathologic: associated mainly with ENT-related problems.
  5. 5. Causes Mainly caused by the presence in the oral cavity of gases known as volatile sulphur compounds (VSC): Hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide These malodorous gases cause the bacterial fermentation of proteins, peptids, mucins or cells found in saliva, blood, gingival crevicular fluid or any food debris that is retained on oral surfaces.
  6. 6. Signs and Symptoms Halitosis of oral origin is characterised by the emission of gases with an unpleasant odour. This odour is more intense: • First thing in the morning after waking (for lack of oral activity and reduced saliva). • After several hours of fasting. • In stressful situations. • After talking for long periods of time.
  7. 7. Signs and Symptoms • Gingivitis-associated halitosis: gums are red and bleed easily. • Periodontitis-associated halitosis: gums are inflamed, bleed easily and change in shape or form, tooth mobility, spaces between teeth, black triangles, changes in tooth position. Individuals are a poor judge of their own breath, as bad taste or oral dryness are sometimes mistakenly construed as being bad breath.
  8. 8. Misconception1: Low Prevalence Around 30% of the adult population is estimated to have or to have had halitosis at some time.
  9. 9. Misconception 2: Origin Almost 90% of halitosis originates in the mouth. Only 13% is associated with ENT-related problems or unknown problems (not even related to intestinal problems, as believed by the majority). 60% of oral halitosis is associated with some form of periodontal disease (gingivitis and periodontitis). The rest is of lingual origin. 87% 8% 5% Origen halitosis Origen Oral Otorrinolaringológico Desconocido 41% 31% 28% Origen Lingual Gingivitis Periodontitis Origen oral
  10. 10. Misconception 3: No reference practitioner exists Halitosis or bad breath is a problem that originates in the oral cavity. REFERENCE PRACTITIONER: DENTIST
  11. 11. Misconception 4: No solution The TREATMENT of oral halitosis consists of: 1. Reducing the number of bacteria that produce the bad odour, which are mainly present on the backmost portion of the tongue dorsum and in gingival sulcus or pockets. 2. Reducing proteins involved in the metabolic process of these bacteria. 3. Neutralising the volatilisation of these malodorous products so that they are no longer perceivable. DAILY HABITS +
  12. 12. Daily Habits • Caring for your oral hygiene: – Brushing should be done 3 times a day for 2 minutes. – Also use interdental cleaning devices such as dental tape and floss, interproximal brushes or oral irrigators. – Tongue cleaning with a tongue cleaner is very important for reducing bacterial build-up. • Drink lots of water to prevent oral dryness, which can lead to halitosis. • Avoid long periods of fasting by reducing the time between meals.
  13. 13. Daily Habits • Limit consumption of tobacco, coffee and alcohol. And foods such as: garlic, onion,… • Avoid using alcohol-based mouthrinses or sprays, as these can worsen the situation. • Maintain a balanced diet, rich in natural foods. Vitamin B deficiency can cause halitosis. • Chew sugarless or Xylitol-containing gum to increase saliva production. • Visit your dentist regularly (once every 6 months).
  14. 14. Treatment For PHYSIOLOGIC HALITOSIS: 1. Professional dental cleaning and polishing 2. Stress oral hygiene: besides toothbrushing, include interdental cleaning with dental tape and floss and/or interdental brushes. 3. Tongue cleaning with a tongue cleaner, reaching the backmost portion of the tongue. 4. Gargle with a specific mouthwash to reach the backmost portion of the tongue dorsum.
  15. 15. Treatment For ORAL PATHOLOGIC HALITOSIS: Besides the above we would add: 5. Treating gum disease. 6. Treating all existing oral diseases, including caries, inadequate fixed prostheses,…
  16. 16. HALITA® doesn’t hide bad breath; it attacks the root of the problem* *Roldán S, Herrera D, Santa-Cruz I, O’Connor A, González I, Sanz M: Comparative effects of different chlorhexidine mouth-rinse formulations on volatile sulphur compounds and salivary bacterial counts. J Clin Periodontol 2004. TREATMENT Treatment PREVENTION
  17. 17. We recommend you visit the following web pages: www.halita.es www.dentaid.es http://blogsaludbucal.es/ For more information
  18. 18. Scientific Support Rainer seemann, d.M.D., Ph.D.; Andi kison; Mozhgan bizhang, d.M.D., Ph.D.; Stefan Zimmer, d.M.D., Ph.D., Effectiveness of Mechanical tongue cleaning on oral levels of volatile sulfur compounds

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