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How to unsuck your power point slides slideshare

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In too many presentations I've attended over the decades, the PowerPoint presentations have sucked! However, by following some simple rules, you can unsuck them.

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How to unsuck your power point slides slideshare

  1. 1. How to un-suck your PowerPoint slides! Dennis Meredith E-mail: dennis@glyphus.com www.DennisMeredithConsulting.com Twitter: @ExplainResearch
  2. 2. I’ve attended countless scientific presentations over the decades.
  3. 3. In too many of them, the PowerPoint slides sucked!
  4. 4. They can easily be un-sucked.
  5. 5. In this brief presentation, I’ll show you how.
  6. 6. First of all, most presenters make their text too small. This is 18-point text.
  7. 7. You can read it perfectly well sitting at your computer. But it’s far too small to be seen on a screen from the back of an auditorium.
  8. 8. The minimum size of your text should be 24 point, like this.
  9. 9. And headlines can be about 40 points, like this.
  10. 10. Serif fonts like Times New Roman are harder to read on a screen than…
  11. 11. …sans serif fonts like this: This is Calibri This is Verdana This is Arial
  12. 12. Another problem is slides that are black text on a white background. The glare makes it hard to see the text and causes eye strain.
  13. 13. At least, give the background some tint like this to reduce eye strain. But that reduces the contrast between the text and the background.
  14. 14. A better solution is to reverse the type out of a dark background like this. It makes the text stand out. It also makes images “pop,” as you can see in the next two slides. First a light background, then a dark one.
  15. 15. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) come from. . . Coal-Fired Plants
  16. 16. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) come from. . . Coal-Fired Plants
  17. 17. Presenters often put too much text on a slide. People cannot listen and read at the same time.
  18. 18. If you keep your slide simple you will find that it is more digestible by audiences and much more memorable than if you clutter it with extraneous text that overwhelms the language- processing part of their brain. Remember…
  19. 19. If you keep your slide simple you will find that it is more digestible by audiences and much more memorable than if you clutter it with extraneous text that overwhelms the language- processing part of their brain. Remember…
  20. 20. If you keep your slide simple you will find that it is more digestible by audiences and much more memorable than if you clutter it with extraneous text and images that do not contribute to your point.
  21. 21. Use short bullets: • Make points easier to jot down • Reduces reading load • More memorable • Create suspense: “What’s he going to say about this point?”
  22. 22. Don’t use labels on your slides. Use headlines that tell the point of your slide. This is a label:
  23. 23. Florida “West Indian” manatee
  24. 24. And this is a headline:
  25. 25. Manatee extinction likely without additional protection
  26. 26. Presenters put too much data on their slides. Like this:
  27. 27. Do you think this presenter talked about every number on this chart?
  28. 28. • Only show numbers to be discussed. • Crop out the teensy type in the caption. • Don’t put text on the screen that’s not meant to be read.
  29. 29. Design your graphs and charts to tell people where to look. This one doesn’t:
  30. 30. 10% 35% 65% Data 1 Data 2 Data 3 This is a headline that makes the point “Washington, G. and Jefferson, T. “Very important research paper,” Top Sci Jrnl, Vol. 400, No. 4, November 8, 2016
  31. 31. Use color to draw the eye to the important data. Like this:
  32. 32. 10% 35% 65% Data 1 Data 2 Data 3 This is a headline that makes the point “Washington, G. and Jefferson, T. “Very important research paper,” Top Sci Jrnl, Vol. 400, No. 4, November 8, 2016
  33. 33. Use arrows to point out important aspects. Like this:
  34. 34. 10% 35% 65% Data 1 Data 2 Data 3 This is a headline that makes the point “Washington, G. and Jefferson, T. “Very important research paper,” Top Sci Jrnl, Vol. 400, No. 4, November 8, 2016
  35. 35. 10% 35% 65% Data 1 Data 2 Data 3 This is a headline that makes the point “Washington, G. and Jefferson, T. “Very important research paper,” Top Sci Jrnl, Vol. 400, No. 4, November 8, 2016
  36. 36. 10% 35% 65% Data 1 Data 2 Data 3 This is a headline that makes the point “Washington, G. and Jefferson, T. “Very important research paper,” Top Sci Jrnl, Vol. 400, No. 4, November 8, 2016
  37. 37. DUAAWETF!
  38. 38. Don’t Use Arcane Abbreviations Without Explaining Them First!
  39. 39. Use visuals to grab your audience’s attention and make your point.
  40. 40. For example, which slide is more interesting and memorable?
  41. 41. The mammalian eye has 70 different cell types. This one?
  42. 42. Or this one?
  43. 43. The mammalian eye has 70 different cell types. Bryan William Jones and Robert E. Marc, University of Utah
  44. 44. You can find many image sources at www.ExplainingResearch.com.
  45. 45. On the Explaining Research menu: Click on Refs and Resources, Ch. 3
  46. 46. Now your PowerPoint slides won’t suck! Dennis Meredith E-mail: dennis@glyphus.com www.DennisMeredithConsulting.com Twitter: @ExplainResearch

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