XVII CENTURY
Age of transition
• King vs liberal parliamentarian government
• Established Church vs liberal Church
government
• Cavalie...
Literature
• Renaissance was over
• Consolidation, introspection and
examination of human values
DRAMA
PROSE
LYRICAL POETRY
THE DRAMA AFTER SHAKESPEARE
(1603-1660)
• BEN JONSON (1573 – 1637)
• Translator, scholar, critic, classicist and
realist (...
• THOMAS DEKKER (1573 – 1632)
• The Shoemaker’s holiday
• THOMAS HEYWOOD (1570 – 1641)
• Dramatic journalist
• A woman kil...
• JOHN WEBSTER (1575 – 1625)
• Tragedies of blood: The White Devil (1612) and
The Dutchess of Malfi (1614)
• JOHN FORD (15...
Closing of the theatres
• Actors vs. Puritans
• 1575: no theatres within the city
• 1603 (James I): from the theatres to t...
THE AGE OF PROSE
FRANCIS BACON (1561-1626)
• Reign of James I: Lord Chancellor, Viscount St. Albans
• Accused of corruptio...
• Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618):
– The History of The World
• Lord Clarendon (1609-1674):
– History of the Rebellion
• Si...
• Izzak Walton (1593 – 1683):
–The Complete Angler (1653) and Lives
• Jeremy Taylor (1593 – 1667):
–Pastoral writings: Hol...
LYRICAL POETRY
• Religious lyrics: George Herbert, Richard Crashaw,
Henry Vaughan Robert Herrick and John Donne
• Cavalier...
• JOHN DONNE (1573 – 1631)
– His Songs ans Sonnets and Divine Poems (1633)
– Classical in form (satires, epistles and eleg...
THE SCHOOL OF SPENCER
– Modification of the Spencerian stanza for narrative poetry
– Figures of speech (personification)
–...
• ROBERT HERRICK (1591 – 1674)
– Hesperides and Noble Numbers (1648)
THE CAVALIER POETS
• Thomas Carrew (1595 – 1639):
– M...
THE RESTORATION
(1660-1700)
•Introduced a century of realism
•Tories and Whigs
•Conservatism and moderation
Restoration Literature
• Largely politics-oriented
• Guideline provided by French literary taste
• Order and discipline
• ...
John Bunyan (1628-1688)
• Grace Abounding (1665)
• Pilgrim’s Progress (1678)
• The Holy War (1682)
John Dryden (1631-1700)
• Absalom and Achitophel (1681)
• Religio Laici (1682)
• Favored the modern sentence (lean,
muscul...
• Samuel Butler (1612-1680)
Hudibras (1663)
• Samuel Pepys (1633-1703)
Diary (1660-1669)
• Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)
Levia...
John Locke (1632-1704)
• Two Treatises of Government (1690)
• Essay Concerning Human Understanding
(1690)
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Xii century

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Xii century

  1. 1. XVII CENTURY
  2. 2. Age of transition • King vs liberal parliamentarian government • Established Church vs liberal Church government • Cavaliers vs Puritans Tories vs. Wigs
  3. 3. Literature • Renaissance was over • Consolidation, introspection and examination of human values
  4. 4. DRAMA PROSE LYRICAL POETRY
  5. 5. THE DRAMA AFTER SHAKESPEARE (1603-1660) • BEN JONSON (1573 – 1637) • Translator, scholar, critic, classicist and realist (comedy of manners). • Comedies: The Silent Woman, The Alchemist, Valpone, Bartholomew Fair • JOHN FLETCHER (1584-1616) & FRANCIS BEAUMONT (1579-1635) • Philaster and The Maid’s Tragedy
  6. 6. • THOMAS DEKKER (1573 – 1632) • The Shoemaker’s holiday • THOMAS HEYWOOD (1570 – 1641) • Dramatic journalist • A woman killed with Kindness (1603), The Fair Maid of the West (1610), Love’s Mistress (1636) and The Wise Woman of Hogsdon (1604) • THOMAS MIDDLETON (1570 – 1627) • Lawyer-playwrighter • Combined comic prose with serious blank verse • Michaelmas Term (1606), The Changeling (1622) and Women Beware Women (1621)
  7. 7. • JOHN WEBSTER (1575 – 1625) • Tragedies of blood: The White Devil (1612) and The Dutchess of Malfi (1614) • JOHN FORD (1586 – 1640) • Excellence of the structure and use of the blank verse • Morbid and melancholic • The Broken Heart (1633) and ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore (1627) • PHILIP MASSINGER (1583 – 1640) • Puritan • A New Way to Pay Old Debts (1625). • JAMES SHIRLEY (1596 – 1666) • Imitative, precious, and uninspired. • Hyde Park (1637)
  8. 8. Closing of the theatres • Actors vs. Puritans • 1575: no theatres within the city • 1603 (James I): from the theatres to the court • 1642: closing of theatres • 1649: closing of the court (O. Cromwell)
  9. 9. THE AGE OF PROSE FRANCIS BACON (1561-1626) • Reign of James I: Lord Chancellor, Viscount St. Albans • Accused of corruption charges he retires to his country estate (study of science and philosophy) • The Instauratio Magna, Novum Organum • Beginnings of inductive reasoning • The New Atlantis: Utopia ruled by study and experimentation • Essays or Council Civil and Moral (1597 and 1625) • Compact, economical, and pithy style.
  10. 10. • Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618): – The History of The World • Lord Clarendon (1609-1674): – History of the Rebellion • Sir Thomas Browne (1605-1682): – Vulgar Errors (1646), Religio Medici (1642), Hydiotaphia (1658) – Style: funeral, grand and solemn – Heavy language and phrases coined from the Latin and Greek • Robert Burton (1577 – 1641): – The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621)
  11. 11. • Izzak Walton (1593 – 1683): –The Complete Angler (1653) and Lives • Jeremy Taylor (1593 – 1667): –Pastoral writings: Holy Living (1650) and Holy Dying (1651). • Thomas Fuller (1608 – 1661): –Holy State and The Profane State (1642) • The Authorized Bible (1611): –Beauty of language –Elizabethan and Shakespearean style
  12. 12. LYRICAL POETRY • Religious lyrics: George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan Robert Herrick and John Donne • Cavalier Lyrics: Thomas Carew, Richars Lovelance and Sir John Suckling. • Metaphysical Lyrics: John Donne • Classicist Lyrics: Ben Jonson • The Formalists or Pre-Augustans: Sir William Davenant, Sir John Denham, Abraham Cowley, Edmund Waller and Andrew Marvell.
  13. 13. • JOHN DONNE (1573 – 1631) – His Songs ans Sonnets and Divine Poems (1633) – Classical in form (satires, epistles and elegies) – Unusual lyrical forms – Frank, realistic and cynical • GEORGE HERBERT (1593 – 1632) – The Temple (1633) – A priest to the Temple (1652) – Use of conceits, direct and familiar phrasing • RICHARD CRASHAW (1612 – 1649) – Steps to the Temple (1642) - secular and religious subjets. – Diffuseness and unevenness; rich in affective imagery. • HENRY VAUGHAN (1621 – 1695) – Silex Scintillans (1650) - religion and nature. – uneven and obscure
  14. 14. THE SCHOOL OF SPENCER – Modification of the Spencerian stanza for narrative poetry – Figures of speech (personification) – Pastorals • Gilbert Fletcher (1588 – 1623) – Christ’s Victory and Triumph on Earth and in Heaven (1610) • Phineas Fletcher (1582 – 1650): – The Piscatory Eclogues and The Purple Island • William Browne (1590 - 1645): – Britannia’s Pastorals • George Wither (1588 – 1667): – Pastoral – Style: spontaneous and diffuse – The Shepard’s Hunting (1615), Fidelia (1615), Fair Virtue: The Mistress of Philarete (1622) and “Sall I, Wasting in Despair
  15. 15. • ROBERT HERRICK (1591 – 1674) – Hesperides and Noble Numbers (1648) THE CAVALIER POETS • Thomas Carrew (1595 – 1639): – Mixture of genuine beauty and dignity, with occasional licentiousness. – Influenced by both Ben Jonson and John Donne. – Coelum Britannicum (1634) • Richard Lovelance (1618 -1657): – To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars and To Althea, from Prison • Sir John Suckling (1609 – 1642)
  16. 16. THE RESTORATION (1660-1700) •Introduced a century of realism •Tories and Whigs •Conservatism and moderation
  17. 17. Restoration Literature • Largely politics-oriented • Guideline provided by French literary taste • Order and discipline • Heroic couplet  two pentameter lines connected by rhyme
  18. 18. John Bunyan (1628-1688) • Grace Abounding (1665) • Pilgrim’s Progress (1678) • The Holy War (1682)
  19. 19. John Dryden (1631-1700) • Absalom and Achitophel (1681) • Religio Laici (1682) • Favored the modern sentence (lean, muscular, and relatively short)
  20. 20. • Samuel Butler (1612-1680) Hudibras (1663) • Samuel Pepys (1633-1703) Diary (1660-1669) • Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) Leviathan (1651)
  21. 21. John Locke (1632-1704) • Two Treatises of Government (1690) • Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690)

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