Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Shared scooters, dockless bikes, and you

1,735 views

Published on

Key principles for the future of micromobility

Published in: Environment
  • Tired of being scammed? Take advantage of a program that, actually makes you money! ★★★ http://scamcb.com/ezpayjobs/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Shared scooters, dockless bikes, and you

  1. 1. Shared scooters, dockless bikes, and you Key principles for the future of micromobility May 2019
  2. 2. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 2 Scooters (standing or seated), Segways, e-bikes, etc. Electric or human powered Shared and/or dockless What is micromobility? Forms of transport that can occupy space alongside bicycles: New micromobility options leverage bike space in ways that were not originally intended.
  3. 3. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 3 First mile / last mile Refers to the challenge of getting people to / from public transit services. Transit desert An area where transit-dependent populations lack adequate public transit service. mOS (Mobility Operating system) Technology platform integrating all forms of transit and data to enable systemwide efficiency and control. MaaS (Mobility as a Service) An application enabling trip planning, payments, and ticketing across multiple modes. Modal neutrality A guiding principle that aims to not explicitly or implicitly favor one transportation type (such as cars) above others. What is micromobility? Important concepts:
  4. 4. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 4 Micromobility could help cities and citizens address … 1. Urban congestion. Demand for urban passenger miles across all modes could almost double between 2015–2050. Yet most trips by car and transit are 5 miles or less. Micromobility makes the most of existing roadways and space by “right-sizing” vehicles. Most US car-based trips are short
  5. 5. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 5 Per mile, electric scooters produce only 1% to 2% of the CO2 emissions produced by cars. Even after factoring in the impacts of gas-powered vehicles used to gather, charge, and redistribute them, shared scooters produce just 2% to 28% of the CO2 emissions of cars. 2. Emissions & air quality. Source: https://chesterenergyandpolicy.com/2018/06/11/the-electric-scooter-fallacy-just-because-theyre- electric-doesnt-mean-theyre-green/. Micromobility could help cities and citizens address … Electric scooters emissions per mile compared with average car
  6. 6. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 6 Getting people to and from transit remains a perennial difficulty in many American cities, creating “transit deserts” in some areas. Micromobility can help connect the last mile, providing more equitable transportation to shopping, work, school, and other destinations. 3. Uneven access to transit. 1. Source: Junfeng Jiao and Chris Bischak, “People are stranded in ‘transit deserts’ in dozens of US cities,” The Conversation, March 13, 2018, https://theconversation.com/people-are-stranded-in-transit-deserts-in- dozens-of-us-cities-92722, accessed May 6, 2019. Micromobility could help cities and citizens address …
  7. 7. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 7 Vandalism & theft Retrieving, charging, and redistributing the vehicles nightly Weather & seasonality But challenges persist … For providers: Use of public rights of way & parking Impacts on existing transit usage & revenues Safety of riders and others Data sharing — how, when & where vehicles are being used For cities:
  8. 8. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 8 In response, cities have taken varying approaches Contract The city enters into a public-private partnership with a micromobility provider. The city retains significant control over the deployment of vehicles. Most often seen with docked bike-share programs. Example: New York City Citi Bike Ban The city explicitly forbids the presence of certain types of micromobility vehicles. Can include cease-and-desist letters, impoundments, and operator fines. Example: Columbia, South Carolina Open The city has minimal requirements of providers—e.g., prohibition on sidewalk riding but no fleet caps. This is often a temporary position when dockless micromobility enters a market. Example: Indianapolis Permit City has a formal application and permitting process. Successful permittees must comply with city conditions, which can include fleet caps, data sharing, and other parameters. Example: San Francisco Source: https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/insights/us/articles/5000_small-is-beautiful/DI_Small-is- beautiful.pdf
  9. 9. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 9 Collaboration that brings all stakeholders into the conversation appears to be the only way ahead. The path to potential Build a more robust governance & policy framework to accommodate micromobility as well as the next generation of mobility options. Use micromobility as a test case for developing & deploying an integrated mobility platform (MoS). Embrace modal neutrality. Cities can work to: Proactively address city concerns, ranging from providing helmets to sharing data. Work to ensure that services further city goals and demonstrate value to the overall transportation network. Providers can work to: Both governments and micromobility providers have important roles to play in solving challenges and reaching the potential of micromobility. • Service providers • Transit leaders • Elected officials • City planners • City risk & finance managers • Citizen advocate groups
  10. 10. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. 10 • Analysis of the potential for micromobility growth—and how that will impact communities. • Assessment of key issues faced by cities and service providers. • Four guiding principles for regulation of emerging micromobility services and technologies. Download the article here. Learn more in the Deloitte Insights article, “Small is beautiful.” Article includes:
  11. 11. About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of DTTL and its member firms. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.

×