Lecture One Highlights from History some influences on fashion, from the 1500s to the suffragettes <ul><li>1400s </li></ul...
Elizabeth I – The Rainbow Portrait, attributed to Isaac Oliver, c.1600
Sir Walter Raleigh and his son, 1590
2 <ul><li>1661-1715 </li></ul><ul><li>Reign of Louis XIV of France, the Sun King, set up centralised French state. </li></...
Louis XIV, King of France
Louis XV
Madame de Pompadour, by Francois Boucher
Rococo style
Rococo style
Men 1700s
Wigs for Men, early 1700s
The Macaroni style, 1750s
The storming of the Bastille
French Revolution dress - sans culotte woman
French Revolution dress - sans culotte man
3 <ul><li>1795-1820 </li></ul><ul><li>Neoclassicism, inspired by the ancient Greeks/Romans, brought empire style. </li></u...
Napoleon on his Imperial Throne, by Ingres
Beau Brummel and Dandyism, late 1700s early 1800s
Beau Brummel and Dandyism, late 1700s early 1800s
4 <ul><li>The impact of the Industrial Revolution: </li></ul><ul><li>Changing values moved towards hard work, and notions ...
Mid-Victorian menswear
1860s dresses with wide skirts
Crinolines
Charles Frederick Worth and the birth of ‘Haute Couture’, 1858
Evening dresses, Charles Frederick Worth and Jean-Phillipe Worth, c.1887 and c.1892
5 <ul><li>Two movements that showed dislike of industrialisation: </li></ul><ul><li>1850s-1870s </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-Raph...
Job cigarette paper advertisement by Alphonse Mucha, 1896
Art Nouveau fabric designed by poster-artist Alphonse Mucha, early 1900s
Corsetted fashions shown in Queen magazine, 1905
Nijinsky and the Ballets Russes
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L_McQ_fashion_history_lec1_10-11

  1. 1. Lecture One Highlights from History some influences on fashion, from the 1500s to the suffragettes <ul><li>1400s </li></ul><ul><li>The great explorers - sea-going discoveries of Spain and Portugal </li></ul><ul><li>(new trade routes brought spices, materials, colours from the East) </li></ul><ul><li>ART AND PORTRAITURE – the testimony of the times </li></ul><ul><li>1500s </li></ul><ul><li>Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) – iconic status through portraits </li></ul><ul><li>The Rainbow Portrait </li></ul><ul><li>The Ermine portrait </li></ul><ul><li>The Coronation Portrait </li></ul><ul><li>1588 </li></ul><ul><li>The Spanish Armada </li></ul><ul><li>The power and fashion of the Courts </li></ul>
  2. 2. Elizabeth I – The Rainbow Portrait, attributed to Isaac Oliver, c.1600
  3. 3. Sir Walter Raleigh and his son, 1590
  4. 4. 2 <ul><li>1661-1715 </li></ul><ul><li>Reign of Louis XIV of France, the Sun King, set up centralised French state. </li></ul><ul><li>The Baroque style dominated fashion, art and the decorative arts – stiff, formal and ornate. </li></ul><ul><li>1715-1774 </li></ul><ul><li>Reign of Louis XV, whose mistress was the influential Madame de Pompadour </li></ul><ul><li>The Rococo period – a style that was light and delicate, with abundant ornamentation. </li></ul><ul><li>The 1770s marked the period of the ‘macaroni style’ (in Britain, America). </li></ul><ul><li>1774-1793 </li></ul><ul><li>Reign of Louis XVI, who lost his head (by guillotine) in the French Revolution. </li></ul><ul><li>His wife was Marie Antoinette. </li></ul><ul><li>POLITICAL SATIRE IN GRAPHIC FORM – cartoons and caricature </li></ul><ul><li>1789 </li></ul><ul><li>The French Revolution, which developed its own fashions. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Louis XIV, King of France
  6. 6. Louis XV
  7. 7. Madame de Pompadour, by Francois Boucher
  8. 8. Rococo style
  9. 9. Rococo style
  10. 10. Men 1700s
  11. 11. Wigs for Men, early 1700s
  12. 12. The Macaroni style, 1750s
  13. 13. The storming of the Bastille
  14. 14. French Revolution dress - sans culotte woman
  15. 15. French Revolution dress - sans culotte man
  16. 16. 3 <ul><li>1795-1820 </li></ul><ul><li>Neoclassicism, inspired by the ancient Greeks/Romans, brought empire style. </li></ul><ul><li>This was also the period of the Napoleonic wars. </li></ul><ul><li>1794-1816 </li></ul><ul><li>Beau Brummel – the rise and fall of the first ‘dandy’; an iconic figure in male fashion, introducing codes of dress and etiquette. </li></ul><ul><li>Dandyism: </li></ul><ul><li>Sartorial elegance via simplicity (practical, tailored, well groomed), </li></ul><ul><li>with a studied air of indifference or detachment. </li></ul><ul><li>Marked by sophistication – no powdered wigs or high heels. </li></ul><ul><li>This was the height of the Regency period, and Beau Brummel had a heavy influence over the English Court, especially the Prince of Wales or Prince Regent… until he fell out of favour with the Prince Regent. </li></ul><ul><li>Also the era of Jane Austen: </li></ul><ul><li>Pride and Prejudice (Mr Darcy), Sense and Sensibility and so on. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Napoleon on his Imperial Throne, by Ingres
  18. 18. Beau Brummel and Dandyism, late 1700s early 1800s
  19. 19. Beau Brummel and Dandyism, late 1700s early 1800s
  20. 20. 4 <ul><li>The impact of the Industrial Revolution: </li></ul><ul><li>Changing values moved towards hard work, and notions of class and gender. </li></ul><ul><li>Men showed restraint; women were placed in restrictive clothing. </li></ul><ul><li>The Victorian Era </li></ul><ul><li>Industrialisation brought mechanised textile production (factories), </li></ul><ul><li>Slavery underpinned the cotton industry, and child labour grew in factories. </li></ul><ul><li>1820-1850 </li></ul><ul><li>Romanticism – the corset came back, skirts got fuller, men wore frock coats. </li></ul><ul><li>THE BIRTH OF PHOTOGRAPHY – Fox Talbot credited with fixing an image to paper </li></ul><ul><li>1858 </li></ul><ul><li>Charles Frederick Worth, an Englishman, opened his business in Paris. His work brought the beginning of ‘Haute Couture’. </li></ul><ul><li>By the 1860s, women wore enormous skirts, crinolines and bustles – very unhygienic. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Mid-Victorian menswear
  22. 22. 1860s dresses with wide skirts
  23. 23. Crinolines
  24. 24. Charles Frederick Worth and the birth of ‘Haute Couture’, 1858
  25. 25. Evening dresses, Charles Frederick Worth and Jean-Phillipe Worth, c.1887 and c.1892
  26. 26. 5 <ul><li>Two movements that showed dislike of industrialisation: </li></ul><ul><li>1850s-1870s </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-Raphaelites: group of artists inspired by medieval art (painting, craft) </li></ul><ul><li>Introduced the uncorseted dress (dress reform, female emancipation) </li></ul><ul><li>1870s-1930s </li></ul><ul><li>The Arts and Crafts Movement (f. John Ruskin and William Morris) </li></ul><ul><li>Against industrialisation for its de-humanising working conditions and debased products. Promoted traditional handicrafts. </li></ul><ul><li>The start of the new century brought… </li></ul><ul><li>1890-1910 </li></ul><ul><li>Art Nouveau – highly decorative style of organic, fluid shapes and floral motifs, that influenced architecture, furniture, fashion and graphics internationally. It was considered to be the starting point for Modernism. </li></ul><ul><li>And </li></ul><ul><li>The Belle Epoque (‘the Beautiful Era’) – opulent clothing and s-bend corsetry, elitist fashions for the upper classes. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Job cigarette paper advertisement by Alphonse Mucha, 1896
  28. 28. Art Nouveau fabric designed by poster-artist Alphonse Mucha, early 1900s
  29. 29. Corsetted fashions shown in Queen magazine, 1905
  30. 30. Nijinsky and the Ballets Russes

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