Puppy scams part 1

Lee McTaggart
Lee McTaggartSelf Employed Pet Proffessional at Delayre Kennel - Lee Ellen's Puppy Nursery
Puppy Scams Part 1

Thousands of puppies being
illegally imported to the USA
Background
In the late 80s thru to the early 2000s many cities in California decided to create
    laws to enforce residential dog breeding.
Owners of intact dogs paid a high licensing fee and a fee for a breeder permit
    to breed one litter per year.
They were hoping it would help with pet overpopulation. Less dogs bred, more
    revenue and more dogs adopted from their animal shelters.
In the mid 2000s they decided to make spaying and neutering mandatory for all
    dogs at 4 months of age up unless they fit a criteria including being
    registered with an approved dog registry and in some cases paying for a
    breeder permit even if they were not breeding just in case .
Now in 2011- 12 many cities have banned the sale of puppies from pet shops
    unless they come from the city shelters or approved non-profit rescues.
Similar laws are spreading to other states.
Unintended Consequences
   Many responsible breeders stopped breeding for pets. They still have occasional litters for show
    dogs. Most of the litters are pre-sold
   There is now a shortage in many areas of quality raised and American bred and born pet puppies
    of almost any breed including the very popular breeds. Enter puppy smuggles, illegal importers
    and puppy brokers.
   In 2000 most imported dogs were single imports reports Dr G. Gale Galland DVM for the CDC.
    In 2005 it was estimated that 10,000 puppies, were coming into the USA into San Diego to be
    sold to the public. Many were smuggled, most were very young. Almost all came in from Mexico
    By 2006 the estimate was 280,000.
   Most imports are coming in from Mexico, Korea, and other countries in Asia. They sell the
    puppies from $300 to $3000.
   The main breeds imported are Yorkshires, Maltese, Shih Tzu, Pomeranians French Bulldogs and
    their mixes. Other breeds also are imported
   Many of the puppies are coming in without shots and far younger than 8 weeks of age. Many
    should be still nursing on their mothers and are not even weaned.
   Puppies were found in glove compartments , wheel wells, truck beds. Many without teeth ,
    drenched in vomit, dehydrated .
   According to Simran Zilaro with the San Diego Humane Society ,”Puppy peddling is better than
    selling drugs. The consequences is far less”
New Laws and Taskforces Adopted

   Many of the puppies smuggled in from Mexico were not even weaned. Many died
    shortly after being sold. To try to stop underage sales California passed a law making
    it illegal to sell a puppy under 8 weeks of age. You can take a deposit and hold the
    puppy but if it goes to it’s new home it is a cruelty to animals charge .
   Some communities made it illegal to sell puppies in public places, such as parks,
    street corners, flea markets or parking lots.
   Border Puppy task force in CA was set up in 2004. Consisting of 14 animal welfare
    and law enforcement agencies including US Customs and Border Protection
   Los Angeles County’s Border Puppy Task Force in 07 sent letters to Veterinarians
    (link attached)
   Federally in 2008 the Congress passed an amendment to the Animal Welfare Act
    making it illegal to import puppies for resale if the puppies are under 6 months of age.
    This includes puppies sold from an American address or the importer arranges to
    have the puppy shipped directly to you from another country. 122 STAT. 2226
    PUBLIC LAW 110–246—JUNE 18, 2008
How are we doing
   Puppy peddling has slowed down in the parks. They now sell on side streets out of
    their vehicles. They also come to you. Other than their cell phone number you are
    letting strangers into your home. They will see your possessions, security setup and
    like any good dog seller, ask what happens to the puppy if you are not home. Now
    you have given them a timeline when no one is home.
   The federal law is not being enforced. The CDC not USDA monitors Rabies in
    imported pets, but its regulations neither require a health screen nor evaluation for
    specific zoonosis prior to shipping. The CDC dose not have enough inspectors for all
    the ports of entry, leaving it up to customs and border protection who have no
    Veterinary training .
   CDC requires a confinement agreement to be signed for puppies too young for
    Rabies vaccinations. From Jan 6, 2006 to Sep 2007 , 5100 were signed at just 15
    out of the 20 quarantine stations. In 2006 alone 4000 agreements were violated .
    (see agreement attachment) Puppies must be kept isolated from all other animals
    and humans (other than limited to a caretaker) for the entire agreement . Fine is 1 yr
    in prison and up to a $200,000 fine. If a person should die $500,000. per violation .
   Almost all puppies were put up for sale as soon as they landed
   This year they are amending the regulations to make the law easier to enforce. The
    new regulations should be up and going by 2013
How to not fall prey to illegal
importer
   Never meet a puppy seller anyplace except at their home or business
   If they give you an address and when you arrive it is not a home (park, side street) do
    not buy the puppy and get the license plate of the vehicle transporting the puppy.
   If you do go to the home, if it is in a residential area, be very suspicious, if they have
    several puppies (esp. if many breeds) and don’t have the parents.
   Multiple puppy selling is only legal with a permit as a pet shop or kennel. Only
    puppies bred and raised at a private home is legal in most area and usually restricted
    to 1 litter per year per female (3 litters ) . In areas requiring breeder permits (Los
    Angeles) only one litter per year/
   Ask who their Veterinarian is prior to visiting the puppies
   Kennel permits are issued in M1 and M2 areas and in RA areas. The permit should
    be posted . Pet shops are found in malls and regular retail store areas, Never in
    residential areas .
   Don’t be fooled by nice web sites , or “excuses” as to why they don’t have the
    parents. Or that imports are special , far better them those bred in the USA
   Be very suspicious of mix puppies (designer ), and T Cups, When many puppies are
    available for sale payment is by cash only without option of a major credit card .
   If registered ask to see a copy of the parent’s American registration. Those vetted and
    approved in Los Angeles are : United Kennel Club (UKC), American Kennel Club
    (AKC) Continental KC (CKC) American Dog Breeders Assn, Australian Shepherd
    Club of America, Dog Registry of America ,and American Rare Breed Assn.
Links on this topic
   La County Border Puppy Taskforce letter to the Veterinarians:
   http://admin.publichealth.lacounty.gov/vet/docs/BorderPuppiesPubHlth.pdf

   Inside the Black Market: Puppy Smuggling (DVM 360 Newsmagazine)

   http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+news/Inside-the-black-
    market/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/662872

   States Crack Down on Puppy Mills (DVM 360)

   http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+news/Breed-
    wars/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/658787

   Rabid puppy imported to Netherlands (Not the USA but very informative )

   http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20112

   CDC Form for owners or agents of imported puppies

   http://www.cdc.gov/AnimalImportation/pdf/dog-import.pdf
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Puppy scams part 1

  • 1. Puppy Scams Part 1 Thousands of puppies being illegally imported to the USA
  • 2. Background In the late 80s thru to the early 2000s many cities in California decided to create laws to enforce residential dog breeding. Owners of intact dogs paid a high licensing fee and a fee for a breeder permit to breed one litter per year. They were hoping it would help with pet overpopulation. Less dogs bred, more revenue and more dogs adopted from their animal shelters. In the mid 2000s they decided to make spaying and neutering mandatory for all dogs at 4 months of age up unless they fit a criteria including being registered with an approved dog registry and in some cases paying for a breeder permit even if they were not breeding just in case . Now in 2011- 12 many cities have banned the sale of puppies from pet shops unless they come from the city shelters or approved non-profit rescues. Similar laws are spreading to other states.
  • 3. Unintended Consequences  Many responsible breeders stopped breeding for pets. They still have occasional litters for show dogs. Most of the litters are pre-sold  There is now a shortage in many areas of quality raised and American bred and born pet puppies of almost any breed including the very popular breeds. Enter puppy smuggles, illegal importers and puppy brokers.  In 2000 most imported dogs were single imports reports Dr G. Gale Galland DVM for the CDC.  In 2005 it was estimated that 10,000 puppies, were coming into the USA into San Diego to be sold to the public. Many were smuggled, most were very young. Almost all came in from Mexico By 2006 the estimate was 280,000.  Most imports are coming in from Mexico, Korea, and other countries in Asia. They sell the puppies from $300 to $3000.  The main breeds imported are Yorkshires, Maltese, Shih Tzu, Pomeranians French Bulldogs and their mixes. Other breeds also are imported  Many of the puppies are coming in without shots and far younger than 8 weeks of age. Many should be still nursing on their mothers and are not even weaned.  Puppies were found in glove compartments , wheel wells, truck beds. Many without teeth , drenched in vomit, dehydrated .  According to Simran Zilaro with the San Diego Humane Society ,”Puppy peddling is better than selling drugs. The consequences is far less”
  • 4. New Laws and Taskforces Adopted  Many of the puppies smuggled in from Mexico were not even weaned. Many died shortly after being sold. To try to stop underage sales California passed a law making it illegal to sell a puppy under 8 weeks of age. You can take a deposit and hold the puppy but if it goes to it’s new home it is a cruelty to animals charge .  Some communities made it illegal to sell puppies in public places, such as parks, street corners, flea markets or parking lots.  Border Puppy task force in CA was set up in 2004. Consisting of 14 animal welfare and law enforcement agencies including US Customs and Border Protection  Los Angeles County’s Border Puppy Task Force in 07 sent letters to Veterinarians (link attached)  Federally in 2008 the Congress passed an amendment to the Animal Welfare Act making it illegal to import puppies for resale if the puppies are under 6 months of age. This includes puppies sold from an American address or the importer arranges to have the puppy shipped directly to you from another country. 122 STAT. 2226 PUBLIC LAW 110–246—JUNE 18, 2008
  • 5. How are we doing  Puppy peddling has slowed down in the parks. They now sell on side streets out of their vehicles. They also come to you. Other than their cell phone number you are letting strangers into your home. They will see your possessions, security setup and like any good dog seller, ask what happens to the puppy if you are not home. Now you have given them a timeline when no one is home.  The federal law is not being enforced. The CDC not USDA monitors Rabies in imported pets, but its regulations neither require a health screen nor evaluation for specific zoonosis prior to shipping. The CDC dose not have enough inspectors for all the ports of entry, leaving it up to customs and border protection who have no Veterinary training .  CDC requires a confinement agreement to be signed for puppies too young for Rabies vaccinations. From Jan 6, 2006 to Sep 2007 , 5100 were signed at just 15 out of the 20 quarantine stations. In 2006 alone 4000 agreements were violated . (see agreement attachment) Puppies must be kept isolated from all other animals and humans (other than limited to a caretaker) for the entire agreement . Fine is 1 yr in prison and up to a $200,000 fine. If a person should die $500,000. per violation .  Almost all puppies were put up for sale as soon as they landed  This year they are amending the regulations to make the law easier to enforce. The new regulations should be up and going by 2013
  • 6. How to not fall prey to illegal importer  Never meet a puppy seller anyplace except at their home or business  If they give you an address and when you arrive it is not a home (park, side street) do not buy the puppy and get the license plate of the vehicle transporting the puppy.  If you do go to the home, if it is in a residential area, be very suspicious, if they have several puppies (esp. if many breeds) and don’t have the parents.  Multiple puppy selling is only legal with a permit as a pet shop or kennel. Only puppies bred and raised at a private home is legal in most area and usually restricted to 1 litter per year per female (3 litters ) . In areas requiring breeder permits (Los Angeles) only one litter per year/  Ask who their Veterinarian is prior to visiting the puppies  Kennel permits are issued in M1 and M2 areas and in RA areas. The permit should be posted . Pet shops are found in malls and regular retail store areas, Never in residential areas .  Don’t be fooled by nice web sites , or “excuses” as to why they don’t have the parents. Or that imports are special , far better them those bred in the USA  Be very suspicious of mix puppies (designer ), and T Cups, When many puppies are available for sale payment is by cash only without option of a major credit card .  If registered ask to see a copy of the parent’s American registration. Those vetted and approved in Los Angeles are : United Kennel Club (UKC), American Kennel Club (AKC) Continental KC (CKC) American Dog Breeders Assn, Australian Shepherd Club of America, Dog Registry of America ,and American Rare Breed Assn.
  • 7. Links on this topic  La County Border Puppy Taskforce letter to the Veterinarians:  http://admin.publichealth.lacounty.gov/vet/docs/BorderPuppiesPubHlth.pdf  Inside the Black Market: Puppy Smuggling (DVM 360 Newsmagazine)  http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+news/Inside-the-black- market/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/662872  States Crack Down on Puppy Mills (DVM 360)  http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+news/Breed- wars/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/658787  Rabid puppy imported to Netherlands (Not the USA but very informative )  http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20112  CDC Form for owners or agents of imported puppies  http://www.cdc.gov/AnimalImportation/pdf/dog-import.pdf