Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

New generation soil conditioning technology

119 views

Published on

Davy will discuss why only ‘degraded’ soils are considered poor and in need of improvement when, perhaps, all soils lack certain Presentation for SoilsCon17 (http://www.timohare-associates.com) on physical, chemical and/or microbiological features to be in an optimum state for plant development, requiring a new generation of soil conditioning technology.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

New generation soil conditioning technology

  1. 1. New Generation Soil Conditioning Technology Davy Ottevaere • Technical Manager TerraCottem bvba • Henley-on-Thames, U.K.
  2. 2. New Generation Soil Conditioning Technology Who? What? Why? How?
  3. 3. New Generation Soil Conditioning Technology Who? What? Why? How?
  4. 4. What is soil conditioning? Products incorporated in the soil… Improving its physical and/or chemical features… To compensate a feature which can be limiting to plant development… What
  5. 5. www.SustAffor.eu
  6. 6. What is soil conditioning? Products incorporated in the soil… Improving its physical and/or chemical features… To compensate a feature which can be limiting to plant development…
  7. 7. QUESTION What are the main issues you face in the establishment and maintenance of your projects? To compensate a feature which can be limiting to plant development…
  8. 8. ANSWERS What are the main issues you face in the establishment and maintenance of your projects? Budget Water Plants People Soil Climate Vandalism
  9. 9. CONSEQUENCES What is the long term effect if you don’t address the issues?
  10. 10. ANSWERS What is the long term effect if you don’t address the issues? Higher operating cost Incomplete project Replace plants Higher liability Having to redo the job
  11. 11. • Inadequate plant holes • Inert soils • Pollution, salinity, … • No (or loss of) soil structure • Water retention • Nutrient retention • Lack of water • Irrigation & traffic disruption • Irrigation fails • Waterlogging • High mortality rate • … SITUATIONS
  12. 12. History of soil conditioning… - Since early times… - Until end of 18th century “humus theory” was widely accepted - In the 1830’s first scientific evidence for the mineral basis for plant nutrition. - However, soil science grew slowly for the next 100 years. - Early 1900’s soil erosion (drought, tillage) became a major problem for farmers. - More recently soil amendments were developped…
  13. 13. History of soil conditioning - Since early times… - Until end of 18th century “humus theory” was widely accepted - In the 1830’s first scientific evidence for the mineral basis for plant nutrition. - However, soil science grew slowly for the next 100 years. - Early 1900’s soil erosion (drought, tillage) became a major problem for farmers. - More recently soil amendments were developped… Soil erosion control Improve soil structure Increase nutrient content… … and nutrient retention Optimize air-water content Improve drainage WRC … …Why?
  14. 14. History of soil conditioning - Late 1940’s and early 1950’s: Krilium … linear PAM
  15. 15. History of soil conditioning - Late 1940’s and early 1950’s: Krilium … linear PAM - Cross-linking with salts of acrylic acid - Diaper industry vs. agriculture … Na+ vs. K+/NH+
  16. 16. History of soil conditioning - Early 1980’s: Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem and a team from the Laboratory of Plant Morphology, Systematics and Ecology at the University of Ghent (Belgium)
  17. 17. History of soil conditioning
  18. 18. History of soil conditioning
  19. 19. History of soil conditioning
  20. 20. History of soil conditioning - Early 1980’s: Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem…  Years of testing (1993)  The TerraCottem principle  “even in the poorest soil conditions a wide variety of indigenous trees, grasses, vegetables and herbs flourished, reversing the devastating pattern of desert encroachment, deforestation and wind erosion.”
  21. 21. - Soil conditioning principle tested in other cultivations, climates and applications… History of soil conditioning
  22. 22. What do plants need to grow? - Oxygen - Water - Mineral nutrients - Some organic growth activators All these elements are normally absorbed by the roots (some also through the leaves). → They are present in the TerraCottem® soil conditioners. …How?
  23. 23. Law of the limiting factor (based on Liebig's law of the minimum): Plant growth is controlled not by the total amount of resources available, but by the scarcest resource (limiting factor). → The TerraCottem soil conditioning technology offers all ingredients required for qualitative plant development. What do plants need to grow?
  24. 24. A soil is a complex and heterogeneous environment for the plants Soil science: • Soil physics • Soil chemistry • Soil biochemistry • Soil microbiology • Etc. An integrated approach is needed to cover all these aspects. → The TerraCottem® soil conditioners improve several soil properties. What do plants need to grow?
  25. 25. The TerraCottem® soil conditioning technology is defined as an effective soil conditioner consisting of a proprietary mixture each of more than twenty components from different groups all assisting the plant growth processes in a synergetic way.  Growth precursors  Hydroabsorbant polymers  Fertilizers  Carrier material What do plants need to grow? Youtube/myterracottem
  26. 26.  Growth precursors • Play a very important role in the initial growth phase of the plant. • Activate root cell elongation and differentiation. • Promote leaf development and biomass production. => Roots are encouraged to grow more rapidly to depths where more water is present. What do plants need to grow?
  27. 27. Root development of Lepidium Sativum (garden cress) with and without growth precursors day 1 day 2 day 3 day 4 day 5 What do plants need to grow?  Growth precursors
  28. 28. What do plants need to grow?  Growth precursors
  29. 29. Soil Sand 90/10 Sand 90/10 + TCT What do plants need to grow?  Growth precursors Youtube/myterracottem
  30. 30.  Hydroabsorbant polymers • Absorb water that is normally lost to evaporation and leaching: => reducing the volume and frequency of irrigation. • This water is kept at the disposal of the plant that accesses the stored water on demand through their root hairs. 97-99% What do plants need to grow?
  31. 31.  Hydroabsorbant polymers What do plants need to grow?
  32. 32.  pF - curve:  Relation between - the“force” that is holding the water in the soil and - the volumetric percentage of water present, Suction force 100cm = WH Sand
  33. 33. Suction force Clay  pF - curve:  Relation between - the“force” that is holding the water in the soil and - the volumetric percentage of water present, 100cm = WH
  34. 34. Suction force  pF - curve:  Relation between - the“force” that is holding the water in the soil and - the volumetric percentage of water present,Loam 100cm = WH
  35. 35. Clay Loam Sand Suction force Field capacity = the amount of water held in the soil after excess water has drained away. 100cm = WH
  36. 36. Suction force Field capacity: => sand… barely  7% !!! Clay Loam Sand
  37. 37. Suction force Wilting point: the percentage of water in the soil that is no longer available for the plant roots Clay Loam Sand
  38. 38. Suction force Wilting point:  2% of this 7% is not accessable for the grass roots Clay Loam Sand
  39. 39. Suction force Wilting point Field capacity 7% - 2% = only 5% plant available water in a sandy soil 5% Clay Loam Sand
  40. 40. Suction force  Clay: 50% - 28% = 22% plant available water 22% Clay Loam Sand
  41. 41. Zand Suction force Sand + TC soil conditioner
  42. 42. Zand Suction force 5% Sand WITHOUT soil conditioning
  43. 43. Zand Suction force Sand WITH TC soil conditioning 25%
  44. 44.  Fertilizers • Offer a balanced nutrition program, • based upon macro and microelements. What do plants need to grow?
  45. 45. TCT Measured through CEC (Cation Exchange Capacity) = the capacity of the soil to exchange positively charged ions with the soil solution;  soil “fertility”; sand loam clay  Carrier material • Selected for their: → own chemo-physical properties (CEC, WRC, etc.) → potential to allow homogeneous mixing of other components during production, transportation and application. What do plants need to grow?
  46. 46. CEC TCT = 150 meq/100g sand loam clay  Carrier material • Selected for their: → own chemo-physical properties (CEC, WRC, etc.) → potential to allow homogeneous mixing of other components during production, transportation and application. What do plants need to grow?
  47. 47. Impact of each group of TC components on plant growth SY N ER GY : 21,32% Carrier (lava): 0.80% Growth precursors: 20.93% Fertilisers: 47.44% Polymers: 9.51% What do plants need to grow?
  48. 48. BENEFITS The proprietary mixture of different hydroabsorbant, nutritive, root growth activating and carrier components work in synergy, in order to obtain: • Better plant growth → Stronger & deeper root development → Faster & better plant establishment → Better seed germination • Optimal use of water → Increased water retention capacity • Optimal composition and use of fertilizers → Better plant growth → Increased CEC value • Increased microbiological activity • Higher resistance to drought stress and diseases • Enables plant growth in degraded, saline or otherwise marginal soils Water savings of up to 50% Healthier plants & increased yields Increased survival rate Earlier harvesting Less nutrient leach-off Better use of fertilizers What do plants need to grow? Impact of each group of TC components on plant growth
  49. 49. … 10 weeks after seeding Oudenaarde, Belgium 4 weeks after seeding… Lawns – sports turf - golf
  50. 50. … 5 years later, Chipiona, Spain Saline growing conditions Before… … 1 year later… Lawns – sports turf - golf
  51. 51. SpainShallow root zone & high summer temperature Roof gardens
  52. 52. South Korea Flower sculptures
  53. 53. Belgium Flower boxes
  54. 54. U.K. Flower beds
  55. 55. SpainOlive tree planting Trees
  56. 56. … 6 years later Benalup, Spain Transplant of Olea europaea in very compactable soil… Trees
  57. 57. … today Benalup, Spain Trees
  58. 58. Green Asia Mongolia desertification prevention project Environmental restoration
  59. 59. Australia 2015…2014…2013… Transforming sewerage ponds into wildlife lakes Environmental restoration
  60. 60. Project "Green Hope" Burkina Faso Environmental restoration
  61. 61. MalaysiaOil palm Horticulture
  62. 62. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION ! #terracottem /TerraCottem @TerraCottem /TerraCottem www.terracottem.com
  63. 63. TerraCottem Intl S.L. www.terracottem.com info@terracottem.com THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION ! QUESTIONS ?

×