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David S. Feldman, MD
Chief of Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery
Professor of Orthopedic Surgery & Pediatrics
NYU Langone Medica...
Description
Club foot (congenital talipes equinovarus) is
a congenital foot abnormality where a child’s
foot twists at the...
Causes
Club foot may be associated with other
problems in a child but is most often
“idiopathic”, meaning we don’t know wh...
Diagnosis Methods
Club foot is typically diagnosed during
prenatal ultrasound screenings and/or noted
during newborn exami...
Non-surgical Treatment
Club foot in an otherwise healthy child can
be effectively treated with minimally invasive
procedur...
Surgical Treatment
In the past, 85% of infants with clubfoot
underwent major surgery for treatment. I
now rarely treat clu...
Anterior Tibial Tendon Transfer
This procedure is performed after the age of
three if the foot continues to dynamically
tu...
Posterior Release
(Strayer Procedure)
Infrequently, the Achilles tendon may remain
very tight even after treatment which
p...
Osteotomy
In rare cases, a clubfoot may grow banana
shaped which requires the cuneiform,
cuboid, and / or calcaneus bones ...
David S. Feldman, MD
Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon
www.davidsfeldmanmd.com
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Clubfoot (Congenital Talipes Equinovarus)

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Clubfoot (congenital talipes equinovarus) is a congenital foot abnormality where a baby’s foot twists at the ankle, turning the foot inward. Club foot may be associated with other problems in a child but is most often “idiopathic”, meaning we don’t know why the child developed the club foot. As a result of advances in treatment, the majority of clubfoot cases can now be treated without surgery or with minimally invasive techniques.

http://www.davidsfeldmanmd.com/specialties/lower-limb-deformities/club-foot

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Clubfoot (Congenital Talipes Equinovarus)

  1. 1. David S. Feldman, MD Chief of Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery Professor of Orthopedic Surgery & Pediatrics NYU Langone Medical Center & NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases Clubfoot(Congenital Talipes Equinovarus)
  2. 2. Description Club foot (congenital talipes equinovarus) is a congenital foot abnormality where a child’s foot twists at the ankle, turning the foot inward.
  3. 3. Causes Club foot may be associated with other problems in a child but is most often “idiopathic”, meaning we don’t know why the child developed the club foot.
  4. 4. Diagnosis Methods Club foot is typically diagnosed during prenatal ultrasound screenings and/or noted during newborn examinations where the foot is often found to be rigidly turned in.
  5. 5. Non-surgical Treatment Club foot in an otherwise healthy child can be effectively treated with minimally invasive procedures such as The Ponseti technique, which uses a series of very specifically molded casts to guide a child’s club foot into the proper position.
  6. 6. Surgical Treatment In the past, 85% of infants with clubfoot underwent major surgery for treatment. I now rarely treat club foot with surgery and almost never in a child without an underlying disorder.
  7. 7. Anterior Tibial Tendon Transfer This procedure is performed after the age of three if the foot continues to dynamically turn in. It involves moving a tendon from the inside of the foot to the middle so the child can pull the foot straight up. This is the most common surgical procedure performed for club foot.
  8. 8. Posterior Release (Strayer Procedure) Infrequently, the Achilles tendon may remain very tight even after treatment which prevents the ankle from moving up so the muscle has to be lengthened and/or the joint loosened.
  9. 9. Osteotomy In rare cases, a clubfoot may grow banana shaped which requires the cuneiform, cuboid, and / or calcaneus bones to be broken so that the foot can be straightened.
  10. 10. David S. Feldman, MD Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon www.davidsfeldmanmd.com

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