Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Jessica Gidzinski, David Pearson, Travis Weiss
Advisor: Dr. Michele Marcolongo
Mentors: Alicia Kriete, Evan Phillips, Dr. ...
Problem Statement
Problem: As skin ages, it dehydrates and loses
compliance.
• Vulnerability to wounds/infection
o 92% of ...
Skin Layers and Molecular Composition
● Epidermis
● Dermis
● Hypodermis
● ECM: offers structural and
biochemical support
○...
Proteoglycans
Protein core with covalently attached
glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains
Functions:
• Mechanical:
o Increased wa...
Proposed Solution - Biomimetic Proteoglycans (BPGs)
• Increased hydration & compliance
• Restored PG content could potenti...
Objectives and Methods
Objective 1: Determine if BPGs have a statistically
significant effect on skin compliance
Method: E...
Piezoelectric Finger (PEF) Method
Xu, Xin, Cynthia Gifford-Hollingsworth, Richard Sensenig, Wei-Heng Shih, Wan Shih, and A...
Confocal Microscopy
Embedding Mold
Leica 1850 Cryostat
8
Confocal Microscopy Images
9
Confocal Microscopy Results
10
● Decrease in amount
of molecule near
injection sites over
24 hr period
● Overall, molecula...
Overall Conclusions and Design Considerations
• For the first time, demonstrated molecular
engineering of the ECM of porci...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Novel Use of Biomimetic Proteoglycans to Molecularly Engineer the Extracellular Matrix of Damaged Skin

699 views

Published on

Drexel University College of Engineering Senior Design Competition Presentation

Published in: Engineering
  • Be the first to comment

Novel Use of Biomimetic Proteoglycans to Molecularly Engineer the Extracellular Matrix of Damaged Skin

  1. 1. Jessica Gidzinski, David Pearson, Travis Weiss Advisor: Dr. Michele Marcolongo Mentors: Alicia Kriete, Evan Phillips, Dr. Katsiaryna Prudnikova Novel Use of Biomimetic Proteoglycans to Molecularly Engineer the Extracellular Matrix of Damaged Skin 1
  2. 2. Problem Statement Problem: As skin ages, it dehydrates and loses compliance. • Vulnerability to wounds/infection o 92% of institutionalized elderly sustain at least 1 skin tear every year • Wrinkles 2MALONE, ML, et al. "the Epidemiology of Skin Tears in the Institutionalized Elderly."JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY 39.6 (1991): 591-5. Web. and proteoglycans (ECM molecules)
  3. 3. Skin Layers and Molecular Composition ● Epidermis ● Dermis ● Hypodermis ● ECM: offers structural and biochemical support ○ Structural proteins ○ Glycoproteins ○ Proteoglycans (PGs): embed structural proteins & are critical for wound healing ■ PG breakdown over time causes dehydration and reduced compliance ECM 3reading.ac.uk headandneckcancerguide.org
  4. 4. Proteoglycans Protein core with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains Functions: • Mechanical: o Increased water uptake (hydration)→ negatively charged GAG chains • Biological: ○ PGs aid in last 2 stages of wound healing 1. Cell migration/proliferation (fibroblasts) 2. Remodelling: bind to type I collagen fibers in skin to align them in organized fashion 4sci.utah.edu
  5. 5. Proposed Solution - Biomimetic Proteoglycans (BPGs) • Increased hydration & compliance • Restored PG content could potentially enhance wound healing o PGs align collagen fibers during wound healing o High PG content→less scarring 5 Degenerated Tissue Restored Tissue (Hydration/Swelling) Marcolongo, M. "Matrix Molecular Engineering Using Biomimetic Proteoglycans." 26 Oct. 2015. Lecture. Lightfoot Vidal, Sarah Eugenia, Michele S. Marcolongo and Drexel University. College of Engineering. "Novel Biomimetic Aggrecan for the Acellular Regeneration of the Intervertebral Disc: Synthesis, Enzymatic Stability and Molecular Engineering." 2013. Web. PAA
  6. 6. Objectives and Methods Objective 1: Determine if BPGs have a statistically significant effect on skin compliance Method: Employ piezoelectric finger (PEF) method to measure elastic modulus of BPG-injected porcine skin samples Objective 2: Evaluate the diffusion behavior of BPGs in skin Method: Cryosection samples thin enough to view under confocal microscope; quantify percent area fluorescence of tagged BPGs at varying distances from injection site 6
  7. 7. Piezoelectric Finger (PEF) Method Xu, Xin, Cynthia Gifford-Hollingsworth, Richard Sensenig, Wei-Heng Shih, Wan Shih, and Ari D. Brooks. "Breast Tumor Detection Using Piezoelectric Fingers: First Clinical Report." Vol. 216, No. 6. Drexel University, June 2013. 7 Exceeded target of 25% reduction in modulus (increased compliance)
  8. 8. Confocal Microscopy Embedding Mold Leica 1850 Cryostat 8
  9. 9. Confocal Microscopy Images 9
  10. 10. Confocal Microscopy Results 10 ● Decrease in amount of molecule near injection sites over 24 hr period ● Overall, molecular level integration with existing extracellular matrix and diffusion around injection site is shown over a 24 hr period.
  11. 11. Overall Conclusions and Design Considerations • For the first time, demonstrated molecular engineering of the ECM of porcine skin using biomimetic proteoglycans. • The skin hydration and increased compliance caused by injectable BPGs offers potential for treatment of diseased and aged skin against tearing and subsequent infection. o An injection of natural PGs can cost $300/mg while an injection of BPGs typically costs $0.06/mg. 11

×