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Classroom Management Strategies for Keeping Students Focused and On Task

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Using CHAMPS Model for classroom management. What are the ingredients of an effective classroom? Teacher discipline traps. Using data for discipline.

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Classroom Management Strategies for Keeping Students Focused and On Task

  1. 1. EDUCATING OUTSIDE THE BOX SIMPLE STRATEGIES FOR KEEPING STUDENTS FOCUSED AND ON TASK LES Summer Institute August 22-24, 2011 David O. Saenz, PhD, EdM, LLC Clinical and Consulting Psychologist (412) 853-2000 dosaenz@psych-consulting.com www.psych-consulting.com
  2. 2. Bats…Baseball Bases….andGloves
  3. 3. • Ingredients of an effective classroom • Ingredients of an ineffective classroom • CHAMPs classroom management strategies • Tools of the Trade- small strategies to keep a class focused and on task • View CHAMPs’ in action videos • Develop 4-5 CHAMPs’ transition and work slides • Share 2 most effective classroom management strategies (from each teacher) Participants will have an understanding of… Tasks for CHAMPs segment
  4. 4. Life’s 10/90 rules Life Rule: Learning basic solid life principles (10%) will greatly help in solving 90% of life’s issues Carp Rule: 90% of what we complain about happens 10% of the time Money Rule: <10% of the people own 90% of the world’s wealth LES Rule: 10% of what you learn in these trainings will apply to 90% of the issues you’ll see in the school Health Rule: 90% of your health is based on 10% of your lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, positive emotionality)
  5. 5. Ingredients of an effective classroom 1) #1 rule- ROUTINE & PROCEDURES 2) Management of common areas 3) Momentum & pacing 4) Clear set of rules (3-4 max) 5) Follow through (90%) with consequences/redirections– be
  6. 6. Ingredients of effective classroom: 6) Goal oriented instruction 7) Involvement is cornerstone –“disconnectedness” (i.e., not being loved, not belonging or connecting to others): one is always acting to meet a need List 3 more: ** Success vs. failure identity: learned helplessness and hopelessness
  7. 7. Typical classroom management procedures: shifting of acceptance line False line Typical classroom management procedures to look for…
  8. 8. Teacher response/reaction Student behavior Student talking w/o permission Eyes but ignores student Student continues talking and passing notes Eyes but ignores students Student laughing out loud & joking with peers Gives serious look but says nothing Student begins to sling mud and ice at peer Teacher asks student to get to work
  9. 9. Student ignores teacher and slings more mud Teacher asks student to not bother peers and get to work. Student stops to look at teacher 3-5 seconds & repeats behavior Teacher shows anger and yells at student to stop Student stops for <5 seconds and begins talking and laughing Teacher resumes ignoring Student throws paper across room and taunts peer loudly
  10. 10. Teacher angrily gives student choice with expected consequence should he continue Student stops for 3-5 minutes Teacher ignores Student resumes talking to peers Student referred to office as promised Student stops completely until referral is complete (6 minutes) Time from start to finish = 18 minutes Key: Consistency: speed sign, moving trash can
  11. 11. High Problem Classrooms & Teacher Discipline Traps • Reprimand cycle • Teacher’s own emotion (power struggle trap, the world is dark, personalizing issues, fears students, over-control vs. manage) • Excessive talking when correcting/redirecting. Never ask WHY: ask WHAT questions only (K- 6) (Ben’s mowing: Abby’s Goth period) • Limited follow-through • Amorphous, fluid, unclear expectations • Readiness- restaurant vs. classroom
  12. 12. Confusing and conflicting directions/ directives Too many choices or opportunities that result in feelings of being overwhelmed. Lack of clarity of expectations.
  13. 13. Help ME! Help ME! I’m stuck and I can’t get out!! What Gives Bob? I’ve been collecting the data and you’ve been in the shower for three days. Bob is stuck in the vicious cycle of shampoo bottle directions: Lather, Rinse , Repeat. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.
  14. 14. By Dr. L. Riffle
  15. 15. Power & age Adult Adult Adult
  16. 16. Murder and Suicide Rape, hostages Gang activity Drugs, weapons, hate crimes Fighting, instigating fights Sexual harassment, strong sexual comments, touching Stealing, vandalism, destroying others property Pushing, tripping, aggressive horseplay Bullying, threats, cursing and intimidation, backtalk and defiance Put downs, name calling and insults, horseplay, moderate noncompliance Laughing out loud, talking out, joking around, noncompliance Start here to reduce and prevent higher levels of problems
  17. 17. Where CHAMPs fits in the equation…
  18. 18. LES Learning outcomes What 3 new things have you learned so far that can be applied to your coaching role? 1. 2. 3.
  19. 19. = conversation How are we going to communicate? = help How will you get your questions answered? = activity What is the activity we are working on? = movement Are we allowed to move around the room? = participation What behaviors show that you are participating? = success !!! CHAMPs
  20. 20. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1 12-Oct 25-Oct 2-Nov 11-Nov 17-Nov 30-Nov 7-Dec 13-Dec 21-Dec 3-Jan 1-Feb StartofCHAMPs Minutesofinstructionaltime Baseline measures Implementation phase Grade 6-8 after school program measures following implementation of CHAMPs (30 minutes of observation per day)
  21. 21. 0 5 10 15 20 25 1 Outcome measure following implementation of CHAMPs (30 minutes of observation: 2nd grade class) 12-Oct 25-Oct 2-Nov 11-Nov 17-Nov 30-Nov 7-Dec 13-Dec 21-Dec 3-Jan StartofCHAMPs
  22. 22. CHAMPs Skeletal Frame C = Conversation: Can students talk to each other during this activity/transition? How, why, and to whom may students talk? At what level can students talk (e.g., 0 = no talking; 1 = 12 inch voices or voices that only your team can hear; 2 = the entire class can hear you)? H = Help: How can students get questions answered during this activity/transition? How do they get your attention? A = Activity: What is the task/objective of this activity/transition? What is the expected end product? What will students be learning, or what will they have learned by the end of this activity?
  23. 23. M = Movement: Can students move about during this activity/transition? E.g., Can students get up to sharpen their pencil? When and for what reason may students move around? P = Participation: What does appropriate student behavior for this activity/transition look/sound like? How do students show that they are fully participating? S= Signal: Use various hand and arm signals to get student attention, or to mobilize them to move towards the next activity. Hand signals are used to convey information while the teacher continues to instruct, thereby decreasing loss of continuity and subsequent downtime. CHAMPs Skeletal Frame
  24. 24. CHAMPs Frame with Expectations • Conversation: Can you talk? Yes (or no), and at the following level: – 0 = no talking 1 = 12 voice 3 = yes, loud enough so others can hear • Help: How do you ask for help: First you will need to talk to your team and problem solve the issue. If your team can’t resolve the question, then raise your hand and ask for help. Raise your hand and wait to be called on. • Activity: This is what I expect you to get out of this activity (list 1-2 learning objectives). • Movement: Movement will be quiet and orderly, we’ll start with table 1, then 2 then 3… Keep your hands and feet to yourself. • Participation: Everyone is expected to participate, and for this, you’ll not need to raise your hand. All conversation must be focused on the topic. You can ask questions of each other, but only one person talks at a time. • Signal: when I give this signal (time-out signal), everything stops, all talking stops. If someone is breaking a rule, I’ll give the class a reminder about which one of the rules it is (e.g., Conversation, Movement, etc.).”
  25. 25. Level 0 = Silent! No talking. Raise hand and wait to be called on Large group – teacher led instruction Stay in your seat – ask teacher for permission to go to bathroom only Looking at teacher and nodding head. Following along in book with eyes and fingers. SUCCESS for EVERYONE! conversation help activity movement participation Sample Elementary School Teacher Led Instruction
  26. 26. Develop CHAMPs outlines for 1 transition Transition and activity:_________________________ Conversation: Can you talk? For this activity there is a level (circle one) 0= silence 1= 12 inch voices 2= class can hear Help: Activity: Movement: Participation: Signal: CHAMPs video slides 3 more transitions
  27. 27. "In a few seconds we’ll move to this area to begin our small group discussion. Here are the expectations: Conversation: Can you talk? For this activity there is a level (circle 1) 0= silence 1= arms length voices 2= class can hear Help: How do you ask for help?: First you will need to talk to your team and problem solve the issue. If your team can’t resolve the question, then raise your hand and ask for help. Raise your hand and wait to be called on. Activity: This is what I expect you to get out of this activity (teacher can mention learning objectives). Movement: Movement will be quiet and orderly, we’ll start with table 1, then 2 then 3… Keep your hands and feet to yourself. Participation: Everyone is expected to participate, and for this I'll be looking for quiet discussion between students, limited laughter and joking, and progress on the written question from each student. Remember that all conversation must be focused on the topic. Signal: When I give this signal (hand up with fingers stretched out), everything stops, all talking stops. If someone is breaking a rule, I’ll give the class a reminder about which one of the rules it is (e.g., Conversation, Movement, etc.).” Mrs. Dudley’s CHAMPs Expectations
  28. 28. Simple classroom management strategies • Deck of cards (K-12) • Poker chips (K-5) • Never ask WHY: only WHAT (K-7) • Red-Yellow-Green-Green and dancing (K-3) • COMPLIMENT (K-2) • 12 inch voices (K-12) • Tune your brain to Mozart (Frank Sinatra or Andrews Sisters in ISS) (K-12) • Historical Hangman
  29. 29. Simple classroom management strategies • Mystery Motivator (K-2) • Fastest artwork in 2 minutes (K-12) • Check in/Check out system (1- 12) • Make learning fun (K-12)- shuffle math geography, spelling; quiz show; name that tune foreign style (language, country, location); historical hangman (people, places, events) • STAR Diagram (1-4) • For tattlers: Ignore,… walk away,… talk about it,… tell an adult (K-3)
  30. 30. Simple classroom management strategies • Organize 1st day of school celebration • Stand and greet (door, bus stop, classroom, etc.- the Wal-Mart way) • Welcome banners • Directional signs (Alzheimers pts.) • Demonstrate 1-2 routines 1st 3 weeks
  31. 31. Simple classroom management strategies • Room number & your name • Use public address to welcome • Family Day (Muffins with mom: Bagels with dad, etc.) • Positive expectations- belief that each child has potential to learn (self fulfilling prophecy) • LES staff– list 2 per person
  32. 32. Excellent coaching is like kissing In the pursuit of a relationship, we don’t stop at the first kiss……………. Excellent coaching requires a consistent, sustained effort over a lengthy period.
  33. 33. • Scope-- Project size, goals, requirements; project scope is the definition of what the project is supposed to accomplish, in a specific time. • “Scope creep“-- The piling up of small changes that by themselves are manageable, but in aggregate are significant enough to overwhelm the KRA objectives. • Building the project schedule by listing, in order, all the tasks that need to be completed. Assign a duration to each task. • Task analysis and effective time management Coaching Project Management (CPM)
  34. 34. • Flexibility vs. zero float • Creating critical paths Coaching Project Management (CPM)
  35. 35. CPM: Steps to a Work Breakdown Structure • Determine desired project end results then list the steps needed to get there. • List the major steps. Once done, there will be a framework for thinking about and organizing the smaller tasks. • Define the smaller tasks of each major step. Analyze each of the major steps in turn. Figure out what tasks have to be completed to complete that step. • Continue the process. Continue to analyze each of these smaller tasks to identify the component tasks of each. • HINT: Start with the earliest task. Look for tasks can't start until one is finished. The longest of these tasks is the next task in the critical path. Figure out what tasks depend on completion of that second task and the longest of them becomes the third step in the critical path. Continue this until you reach the end of the project.
  36. 36. CPM: Sample Critical Paths
  37. 37. Coach Teacher Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 CPM: Critical Path development
  38. 38. LES Learning outcomes What 3 new things have you learned so far that can be applied to your coaching role? 1. 2. 3.
  39. 39. Data Collection and Presentation 101 Data Quantitative Discrete 5 hats, 23 buttons, 10 jumps Continuous pi= 3.141626592… Qualitative Surveys, Interviews , FBA, behavioral observations
  40. 40. • Discrete- if there are only a finite number of values possible or if there is a space on the number line between each 2 possible values. Discrete variables can have only a certain number of different values between two given points. • Continuous variable- The opposite of a constant. For example, in a family, there can be 1,2, or 3 children, but you can’t have a continuous scale of 1.15, 1.5, or .75 children. • One general way to tell if data is continuous is to ask yourself if it is possible for the data to take on values that are fractions or decimals. If your answer is yes, this is usually continuous data. • 3 minute training video; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=macHGBJZmuY&feature= player_embedded#at=14 Data Collection and Presentation 101
  41. 41. Data Collection and Presentation 101 Discrete or continuous: The number of suitcases lost by an airline. • The height of corn plants. • The number of ears of corn produced. • The number of green M&M's in a bag. • The time it takes for a car battery to die. • The production of tomatoes by weight. • The number of times a student talks out in 30 minutes. • The length of time it takes for a student to learn 3 new math concepts.
  42. 42. • Discrete. The number of suitcases lost is a whole number. • Continuous. The height of corn plants can take on infinitely many values (any decimal is possible). • Discrete. The number of ears of corn is a whole number. • Discrete. The number of green M&M's is a whole number. • Continuous. The amount of time can take on infinitely many values (any decimal is possible). • Continuous. The weight of the tomatoes can take on infinitely many values (any decimal is possible). • Discrete. This is a concrete, specific number that is whole (e.g., 25, 32, 12). • Continuous. Seconds and microseconds have endless possibilities. Data Collection and Presentation 101
  43. 43. Today's Date: Period: LES: Teacher: Start Time: S-1 S-2 S-3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 # minutes on task
  44. 44. Teacher response/reaction Student behavior Student talking w/o permission Eyes but ignores student Student continues talking and passing notes Eyes but ignores students Student laughing out loud & joking with peers Gives serious look but says nothing Student begins to sling mud and ice at peer Teacher asks student to get to work
  45. 45. 0 5 10 15 20 1 Ms. Hamilton Instructional time analysis Number of minutes 75% of students were focused and on task (20 minute observation per day) 18-Jan 25-Jan 3-Feb 8-Feb 3-May Minutes of instructional (on task behavior) is defined as >75% of the students are seated, focused and on task.
  46. 46. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Average Number of Minutes of Instructional Time
  47. 47. Basic graphing in Excel 1) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3eGDiwjlQI 2) Step by step instructions for inputting raw data and fields 3) Shortcuts and tips for using Excel 4) How to create a graph that tells a story 5) Practice using raw data and variables with a partner (LES bring their laptops) 6) How to “sell” your information 7) Data rich ≠ information rich. The difference between being data rich and being information rich.
  48. 48. Why do women live longer than men?
  49. 49. What No One Will Ever Tell You…. But I Will Sooo… why do women live longer than men?....

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