THE AIMIA
LOYALTY LENS
2013 Q4 Report

A quarterly research report which explores
trends in consumer loyalty, attitudes to...
2 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens

INTRODUCTION

The Aimia Loyalty Lens is the first in a series of quarterly research
reports, w...
The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 3

LOYALTY

ONE THIRD OF CONSUMERS COLLECT MORE LOYALTY
REWARDS NOW THAN THEY DID PRE‑RECESSION

...
4 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens

LOYALTY

SUPERMARKETS TOP THE LOYALTY LEAGUE TABLE

From a list of 12 categories, respondents ...
The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 5

LOYALTY

3 IN 4 ARE MEMBERS OF A SUPERMARKET
LOYALTY SCHEME

With supermarkets being first off...
6 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens

TECHNOLOGY

CONSUMERS CLING TO PLASTIC — CONTACTLESS
PAYMENTS AND DIGITAL WALLETS HAVE A LONG
...
The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 7

TECHNOLOGY

In contrast, perhaps it is the slightly more familiar nature of the coupon that ha...
8 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens

PRIVACY

GENERATIONAL PRIVACY DIVIDE

Debate around the collection and use of data has never b...
The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 9

PRIVACY

HAVE YOU READ THE SMALL PRINT?

When signing up to a new product or service 29 percen...
10 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens

PRIVACY

BANKS AND PLACES OF WORK MOST TRUSTED
WITH PERSONAL DATA — ONLINE AND SOCIAL MEDIA
N...
The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 11

CONCLUSION

Consumers and companies are embracing loyalty — whether it’s
through a traditiona...
About Aimia
Aimia Inc. (“Aimia”) is a global leader in loyalty management. Employing more than
4,000 people in over 20 cou...
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The Aimia Loyalty Lens: 2013 Q4 Report

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A quarterly research report which explores trends in consumer loyalty, attitudes to technology and views on sharing personal data.

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The Aimia Loyalty Lens: 2013 Q4 Report

  1. 1. THE AIMIA LOYALTY LENS 2013 Q4 Report A quarterly research report which explores trends in consumer loyalty, attitudes to technology and views on sharing personal data
  2. 2. 2 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens INTRODUCTION The Aimia Loyalty Lens is the first in a series of quarterly research reports, which are designed to explore trends in consumer loyalty, attitudes to technology and views on sharing personal data. The first report includes findings from research conducted in May 2013 and again in August 2013, based on a nationally representative sample of over 2,000 customers. The intent is for the Aimia Loyalty Lens to become a regular survey, which will provide updates and commentary on consumer loyalty and its impact on both businesses and consumers alike. Aimia has been helping businesses build better relationships with their customers for nearly 30 years. Aimia runs its own loyalty programmes — Nectar in the UK and Italy, Air Miles in the Middle East and Aeroplan in Canada — and on behalf of some of the world’s leading brands. Twenty years ago £1 in every £100 of household spend was linked to loyalty. Today, £1 in every £7 spent earns rewards. As technology creates more ways to engage with consumers, so it leads to a proliferation of customer data. This pushes privacy issues into the spotlight, so raising a question as to whether or not customers are aware of how companies are using this information. And furthermore do they care? Is technology really creating better connections between the brand and its customers or actually pushing them further apart? While it is easy to be seduced by these new capabilities and short term deals, they do little to engender true loyalty to a brand — a long-term, mutually beneficial relationship between a business and its customers. 1 Calculation based on ONS statistics, market share data, retailer revenues and relevant loyalty schemes. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 3 LOYALTY ONE THIRD OF CONSUMERS COLLECT MORE LOYALTY REWARDS NOW THAN THEY DID PRE‑RECESSION In the wake of the 2008 credit crunch, customer appetite for loyalty has grown dramatically. Two-thirds of consumers use loyalty currency to help them economise. Eight out of ten loyalty collectors claim points whenever they can, with one third collecting more rewards now than they did before the recession. Aimia has seen evidence of this with Nectar. Since 2009 an additional three million members joined the programme and 44 percent more Nectar points were issued. This research confirms that 87 percent of consumers participate in loyalty schemes with high penetration across all types of households. Being savvy and taking advantage of loyalty schemes has entered the psyche of all consumers with the wealthy, or “thrifty rich”, participating in more programmes than any other group. 4 Cards £30K THOSE EARNING BELOW £30,000 HOLD 4 CARDS ON AVERAGE D CARD LTY CARD RD LOYALTY CAR LOYALTY CA LOYALTY LOYA £90K 7.2 Cards THOSE EARNING OVER £90,000 HOLD 7.2 CARDS ON AVERAGE D CARD LTY CARD RD LOYALTY CARD LOYALTY CARD LOYALTY CARD LOYALTY CARD LOYALTY CAR LOYALTY CA LOYALTY LOYA The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. Whilst there is an obvious correlation with the wealthy and niche programmes like frequent flyers, the “thrifty rich” are also embracing more everyday schemes like the Ikea Family Card. While affluent consumers were best situated to weather the recession’s impact with their high household income and stable careers, they spend less and appear to embrace loyalty more to help make their money stretch further. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. 4 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens LOYALTY SUPERMARKETS TOP THE LOYALTY LEAGUE TABLE From a list of 12 categories, respondents were asked to identify the top three sectors they felt most loyal to. Supermarkets top the table with 29 percent ranking them in the number one position and 57 percent picking them in their list of top three categories. Banks and building societies trail in second place. Only 16 percent of consumers state they are most loyal to this sector while 38 percent list them in their top three. TOP CATAGORIES CONSUMERS ARE MOST LOYAL TO 38% £ 57% 29% BANKS AND BUILDING SOCIETIES 21% SUPERMARKETS AND GROCERY TECHNOLOGY BRANDS MOBILE PHONE 27% FOOD AND DRINK ESTABLISHMENTS 16% FASHION RETAILERS The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. The infographic below demonstrates that again, supermarkets top the table when it comes to loyalty programme membership. Just 12 percent are part of a mobile phone, fashion retail or airline loyalty scheme. AIRLINES FASHION RETAIL MOBILE PHONE HOME IMPROVEMENT RETAILERS CREDIT CARD PROVIDERS FOOD AND DRINK ESTABLISHMENTS PETROL STATIONS PHARMACY AND BEAUTY SUPERMARKETS AND GROCERY CONSUMERS ARE MOST LOYAL TO SUPERMARKETS WITH 73% BEING A MEMBER OF THE LOYALTY SCHEME 73% 32% 27% 24% 17% 13% 12% 12% 12% The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 5 LOYALTY 3 IN 4 ARE MEMBERS OF A SUPERMARKET LOYALTY SCHEME With supermarkets being first off the rank in the 90s with loyalty cards that provided them with real insight into their customers, it is not surprising that they lead the pack by such a wide margin. However as loyalty is engendered through other tools at less cost this margin between supermarkets and other sectors should be reduced. It appears that supermarkets are also getting it right in the way they communicate with customers. They scored the highest in terms of sending out relevant communication to their customers. It can be assumed that they are using the customer data collected via their loyalty programmes to help them deliver more engaging offers. By contrast, the financial services sector scored the worst. What is most surprising about the finding is that this sector holds considerable customer data and should be in a better position to offer more relevant communication to their customers. SUPERMARKETS SCORE HIGHEST WITH CUSTOMERS FOR RELEVANCE OF COMMUNICATIONS 3 SUPERMARKETS AND GROCERY 56% RELEVANT 66% IRRELEVANT CREDIT CARD PROVIDERS 58% IRRELEVANT BANKS AND BUILDING SOCIETIES The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. INERTIA AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Banks and building societies should take note of the reason why their customers remain loyal to them. Thirty-three percent of respondents said it is because “I have been with them many years” and a further 16 percent said “I can’t be bothered to change”. At the moment inertia is the greatest friend to the financial services sector. However, as the seven day switch designed to make it easier and less time-consuming for people to move bank accounts has taken effect in September, it is clear that the sector needs to take the opportunity to transform and rebuild customer relationships. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6. 6 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens TECHNOLOGY CONSUMERS CLING TO PLASTIC — CONTACTLESS PAYMENTS AND DIGITAL WALLETS HAVE A LONG WAY TO GO… The unceasing pace of technological change offers companies around the world an ever-expanding horizon of marketing possibilities. Sixty-four percent of UK consumers own a smartphone, and this figure rises to 81 percent amongst 18-24 year olds. And with 67 percent of consumers using their laptops for online shopping, the potential for consumers to be discovering and eventually making purchases online means we now have a network of shoppers who are “always-on”. Nevertheless, what the findings reinforce is the old adage that early implementation and uptake is often gradual and that for technology to be effective it must first and foremost serve its customers’ needs. Digital wallets are one of the most recent additions to the consumer arsenal. Their potential has been celebrated by some influential companies including Google, Apple and Samsung to name but a few. Yet less than 1 in 10 consumers believe they would be very likely to use a digital wallet on a mobile device at present. This figure doubles (to 22%) when it comes to those who consider themselves “early adopters” of technology but even here digital wallets are currently seen as something they are not likely to use on the whole (49%). The precursor to the digital wallet is often considered to be the contactless card. While awareness of this technology is high (83%), the vast majority of respondents do not use them (24%). As with digital wallets, early adopters and the younger cohort show an increased likelihood to use contactless cards. Despite this, technology and payments companies still need to go further in convincing people of the digital worth of mass adoption. USE OF CONTACTLESS CARDS FOR PAYMENT 24% OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC 36% 18-34 YEAR OLDS 37% EARLY ADOPTERS The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7. The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 7 TECHNOLOGY In contrast, perhaps it is the slightly more familiar nature of the coupon that has led to its relative success in an electronic format. In total, 26 percent of consumers have downloaded an electronic coupon for redemption at a later stage with most of them (79%) accessing them from home rather than on the go. CONSUMERS WHO HAVE DOWNLOADED AN ELECTRONIC COUPON VIA MOBILE DEVICE 26% ALL CONSUMERS 36% 18-24 YEAR OLDS 33% THOSE WITH CHILDREN 25%OFF COUPON 25%OFF 46% EARLY ADOPTERS The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. In short, while the payments industry has been the key driver for technological developments per se, the key to mass adoption may well be the loyalty industry’s ability to incentivise and reward new behaviour. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8. 8 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens PRIVACY GENERATIONAL PRIVACY DIVIDE Debate around the collection and use of data has never been more prominent and as the proliferation of data is set to grow it is only natural that scrutiny from consumers, government and the media should intensify. An obvious contrast is the difference between how the younger respondents feel about sharing data and the older cohorts. Having grown up with the internet and Facebook they appear to have a different set of “rules of engagement” when it comes to personal data. ARE YOUR CUSTOMERS WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? The 18-24 year old cohort are more likely to share a wide range of information online (45%) versus the older cohorts who are more guarded (just 26% for those aged between 55-64). When asked to rate how happy respondents would be to share different types of personal information, name, hobbies and interests and email address top the list. The most guarded information sets are mobile numbers, web history, addresses and income level details. HOW HAPPY ARE RESPONDENTS TO SHARE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PERSONAL INFORMATION? NAME HOBBIES EMAIL INCOME ADDRESS WEB HISTORY MOBILE £ 49% 48% 45% 23% 22% 21% 17% The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. When people were asked whether they have provided false information to companies in the past 38 percent of them admitted to doing so. This phenomenon actually rises to a half (50%) among 18-24 year olds. Mobile numbers, date of birth and false names are the most common details falsified. The main reason for doing so is to avoid companies contacting them in the future (72%). With such a high percentage of the 18-24 year olds providing false information, we can assume that the rules of engagement differ from the older cohorts who were brought up in an “offline” era and were often asked to provide personal details for important documentation. Given that the younger age groups are more likely to engage with companies online and sign up to offers on the go, this could explain the higher numbers providing false information. For businesses this poses a real concern to the quality of the information that is being shared by their customers. They will need to look towards other information to build a more robust understanding of their customers. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9. The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 9 PRIVACY HAVE YOU READ THE SMALL PRINT? When signing up to a new product or service 29 percent of consumers claim to always read the privacy policy. Among the millennial generation this drops to 22 percent. Remarkably, 27 percent of the same age group say that companies are clear about how they use customer information, 5 percent more than have actually read the privacy policy! PERCENTAGE OF CONSUMERS WHO READ THE PRIVACY POLICY AD IQ SE RI UAM RE, ON E LU S ETI S R VI S, M ILIS SER EC O D NC IN OD MAC UM C, RE FO IT S SE CO ULT ; H CE NA O R CU MP US VIC BIS. OC REN L. V L MU LLA IC V ER IEM VAL RIS A PO LA L. E E, U E AC ME ICO POS B LIC S F EST T; E S. G TAN INPR NIC M. A T NO QU I SE CIB RE, ST? RAT UM OR US U SE SSE NO OS , CO US NUM NOS IU I EOR V N ET RE, ND UM S T BON ND ID DI , QU A, A AD I S ES AM U A MA E R AU RE NT SIM M S INAT CTO IT. S M R FO CIT RUM EC AN HO DET NAM . SP. I ST ENE IS C REC ER L. U O VI RBI ; HO SC OC, UM D ON NU C E, IA FE IEN PE C, N ER C E S SE I S RR EM NIM M S CER AT EN QU M , S ES VE IEM . VA CRIS RE SEN NUM NO NA A A D P R B IC A E L M R RI RU SE SSE CR NIHI ILI IA AU IS, Q RI IM E M M E NA VE, E A E I ICO POS RI L. IQ E, A CT NP N O H UO ET RE, ND UMU LIN M, M C FU OO NS SC TI EST US. IC M. L NS UA D A G AN R A T R MA I SE ES R M M NU TU ORLU N CDI- LIS ER NUM ? NO RA UM ORU US US, ILIS M RI I SP E N A S IM S NC VID MO N FO CIT RUM EC AN TE DELVA C , QUE P MA EVID DIC S, Q TIU NO D QU . FE O DU A VI L IE VI RBI ; HO SC OC, UM CON IS; N IC OD OS CIT M INA TO UIT INA, RA C ULT IN R SE SSE T C R O CC . E ME DI I O VE IEM S. VA CRIS RE SEN NUM FIN NHIL N FO MSTIE; SE IS CIAMN MUL ERL OM US EO U D U ET RE, ND I F. RE AB LA ON U I S ES AM ME LIC PO NA A LN REIN IARE, ICT RBEC NA NE NIQ S M IUM BIS PLI VE MA E C T D . Q R A SU I P ES R M PM S ES , US CT INP ONI S M IOA ICU L, ADR O V USSICIA .ERB PR NIEN UE LCAUS RE R, L. ET O T FO CIT RUM EC AN NC U A ; A I M D ICI NU T? N . GR NU ROR CTU . LUS SITI AMU OR ICI NIM UC IS, Q ICM IL E AU S CFA NE, VI RBI ; HO SC OC, UM C LA T I Q F C AM C E VI M D OS, ATIU M E U N S VI OM S NU S V U NEM ILI IA FUR I UOENOSIA UODE, C UR U VE IEM S. VA CRIS RE SEN NUM UD , MOD M E P EMN M N H ID H T M S ET O IB- S D US V R DU IN ICT QU INA ORA CUL SI.N PL O , L RE ER IH , N NIQI L IUM CAN M BOE NM R P NA A CT G I MO O I E, CU E. GR E AC E IN ICON OS RIO L. IQ E, A O , ST M S ATIS R U T.MU , CU CO UUS REA C V EOR NOS RAC I LIN IHILUEINA RE NT. S RNR NM L R O S US. SA SE R UAT R A, AU T NA P. SIM M NO NLLT? ATG TAN PRO ICTUM. LU NSIL UAM D E FE IENA ENE CO NU LA LLA OPL LA TIU E, I CO UD I IE UD EM AN IR ET RE, ND UMU UN CPERDET M ICE T C DE NSU M P BESLA L. S, IQ L. S,UM L OSU AT UM E RU S V S, M IS LA V SIC ES AM N EL HO EE A P R S NU U I O D TR B ET E IN M I RA N N BE IN D . E , INIU NI AU BIS RI IM DE LICI S F IC E, ES ; UIT T; A, AC SER RE EN FIN NTE C, CRLIS M DI DUID QUIICT T;QU A, IN ORA CU IDIN OD NU MD N I S; , MI C A FO S A . O I Q SEPO C TO TR .M EST R IT; UM C M ANU TE C NIHI R ; F QU N LI PO CTOM TR TTSM R EST.MUA, CU CO LTUS REO S , S I E U V ? B HO ESC OC, AM AM LI NE M O IA URN OD OS UOSN CO IBU R S T R SE E, O U U E M, N C IN FEFIENAU NE NCU- NT? LAB LLA MPL NO MN IU TA I BA NFAS UN , NU - ICIE IS. V L RS RR RSE M U NFI , E V M NS OT - C MO IQU M AL . I IS EENA , NA AM R N U IH PE ME M SI A SE ATC CAR T NR DENNSUL PO EST L. E IC S P A IL R E A REN T.E,P NISIM IBU UM VE RE A ME SEIC QUOC O R DL. NUE SI- M I E C PU M RR AC UD DE S CO CO IN . Q , DE ,NIM S UC BBUS IM DE ICI S S FA RE, T; A C A C I IS, IM AC I S ES , US CTA INPRUNI AS M. CI,ONSIE U M AD AT RI RO M IE N ET M A N OLI ON R S UD O HO BOR IAM ND NSU VID T? N . GR H NU N OMCTU E LUSE ILRE M BO N EM IND FUS QUOI NOS QUO E, C CIBU DE U NU E UM IA RU V D EL P DN PC, NS O S R N T S N IS , M UN V PR NER E IQ UMM NLI DIUM TAN S BOON- S RI Q M LI D M OS ATI CM E ILUSC S VIID , M A IQ IS; HI , Q UN I IM IMI UO SENICI IN DICT , LUSU IRISORS CERE IN OD I IMS R NI LIN OR U D U N SP S NOSIMAC UO SE CIE A RE T. S NS HI I VA U , M P MA N TE NO STI S S UM ATI OR IT.M A, C A CO LTU AREO A E LI, E SE R QU .EFERENONSTIUMS TU NACIE UDE NAM P. IMI E CO O CI S ENA TIEN SEN SVID UIC ULD ULS MPTS DA ENU DE CO LNU O A NF OT C , IA M DI S E ESS T M A U LI HO TER IAM TA FEC AT E D N ON BF LA LI;C N M. M IN AM NSICT ER PRME NIN U PIO EOT L. E S E SR NI M O ACIIUERRBIREC N AT NTE S; NI C, IA F SI T M U S M E CT RB I TN NIT. AU BIS NCIM INDE LICI S U REI T; , NI QUE RCA ; HO M SC OC., UM CO HILI, , Q U N PRQ O S FAC ,S R MI C A VI BI . E S FU CU L LI S. C EN UO V C AC MIL CIEAU UVA CRIS ERE SEN NUM NFIN NE V IA C RN TOD TOS OR S I,CIO IBU A A M, O IQ NUUSTA U B EN S MN IEE EIRIE M MEE LIU PO NA A L RE IAM D F R M V MO U UM VNT ON M MP EI R E LIN IH M PE HO AA , IT CO - S RI . IQ , A , . AT E IL R L AM EN R SP SIM RR ST US. CTA NER NIC M. L ONS UA D PE NUD ? CG MN P RO T ACIC UDEOA E . IN AC I M , N OU I U AT M IE V ET R R O NU RRUMELNS S RATIUR E RU NUS V S, M LIS UD E EM M HO , ERA IAM V UM DII ; I EL C, C N UN D IA NUIDACR TO, QUITNIINA ORA CULTDIN ROD I IS; UN M MST TESNATISU RIHI .M HI , C CO US EO NI DA NE C CM UNL UL UL M HI TE LI, F I NA E O , CO NU MEMEOSS NEN ONS- UIM P ABE LA L PLIC C T P DE U NF R M IN A B S ERI I FN UL O ST . E IN RE NIU N-M N DE QICI SES FACRE, T; IA M OS UO , C IBU , M TA S B ON S NT O . S NS IM P. I 29% ALWAYS READ 2% DON’T KNOW 7% NEVER READ 20% RARELY READ 42% SOMETIMES READ The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10. 10 / The Aimia Loyalty Lens PRIVACY BANKS AND PLACES OF WORK MOST TRUSTED WITH PERSONAL DATA — ONLINE AND SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORKS NEED TO BE MORE TRANSPARENT When consumers were asked to rank how comfortable they are with companies handling their personal data, the financial services sector came out on top with a mean score of 8.2 followed by place of work with a score of 6.9. MOBILE PHONE ONLINE RETALIERS 5.3 5.3 2.6 2.5 ONLINE SEARCH ENGINES 5.6 SOCIAL NETWORKS 5.9 LOYALTY PROGRAMMES 6.1 GOVERNMENT AGENCIES 6.7 UTILITY COMPANIES 6.9 PLACE OF WORK FINANCIAL SERVICES 8.2 SUPERMARKETS CONSUMERS ARE MOST COMFORTABLE WITH BANKS AND PLACES OF WORK HANDLING THEIR DATA The Aimia Loyalty Lens © 2013. Such high levels of customer assurance are likely to be driven by the highly confidential nature of banking and places of work and the data security policies involved with both. A surprising finding in this area is that supermarkets rank third for handling customer data (6.7 ranking) compared to utility companies (6.1) mobile phone providers (5.9) and online retailers (5.6). Given that supermarkets assess what is in a shopping basket as opposed to the highly personal nature of information that is shared with banks and employers, it is a high score for this sector and again could be as a result of the way supermarkets have proven themselves in managing their customers’ data. In contrast, the more aggressive privacy policies of some online businesses are only strengthening the public’s notion that social media networks are not being upfront about collecting and using data. Instead, they have become a “necessary evil” which, albeit beneficial, are not doing enough to spell out exactly how our data is being used. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11. The Aimia Loyalty Lens / 11 CONCLUSION Consumers and companies are embracing loyalty — whether it’s through a traditional plastic card or virtual schemes. Technology has made it easier for companies to not just understand customer transactions but also the interactions they have with the company — from searching online before they buy through to writing a review post purchase — and these tools are likely to proliferate over the next few years. In the Big Data era, our research shows that many consumers aren’t clear about how their data is used or why. For many, they are unaware of the exact ramifications of the privacy contracts they are entering into. There is also a clear divide between the millenials who are more likely to share a wide range of information versus the older cohorts who are more guarded. Companies will need to take this on board and clearly have further to go in being transparent about how they are using or intend to use their customers’ data. The overwhelming positive response to supermarkets and the way they are using customer data based on the relevancy of their communications shows that customers are happy to trade information as long as the rewards are relevant. However, with the seven day switch taking effect, the financial services industry in particular needs to understand it can no longer rely on consumer inertia. Banks and building societies will need to start providing customers with more relevant communications in order to retain them. © 2013 Aimia Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12. About Aimia Aimia Inc. (“Aimia”) is a global leader in loyalty management. Employing more than 4,000 people in over 20 countries worldwide, Aimia offers clients, partners, and members proven expertise in launching and managing coalition loyalty programs, delivering proprietary loyalty services, creating value through loyalty analytics, and driving innovation in the emerging digital, mobile, and social communications spaces. Aimia owns and operates Aeroplan, Canada’s premier coalition loyalty program, Nectar, the United Kingdom’s largest coalition loyalty program and Nectar Italia, Italy’s first independent loyalty coalition program. In addition, Aimia owns stakes in Air Miles Middle East, Mexico’s leading coalition loyalty program, Club Premier, Brazil’s Prismah Fidelidade, and i2c, a joint venture with Sainsbury’s offering insight and data analytics services in the UK to retailers and suppliers. Aimia also holds a minority position in Cardlytics, a U.S.-based private company operating in transaction-driven marketing for electronic banking. Aimia is listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: AIM). Visit us at www.aimia.com.

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