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11 things Congress is doing about the Ukraine Crisis - Q1 2014

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The crisis in Ukraine ignited a geopolitical crisis that experts have called the biggest conflict since the Cold War. Congress introduced 11 measures related to the crisis since the crisis began in November 2013, which included 5 resolutions in response to early protests by Ukrainians. Later, in response to Russian forces entering the Crimean Peninsula, Congress introduced 6 additional measures in support of Ukraine’s sovereignty and economic stability.

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11 things Congress is doing about the Ukraine Crisis - Q1 2014

  1. 1. 11 Congressional Ideas for Ukraine Population 44,291,413 (July 2014 est.) www.votetocracy.com Votetocracy.com is a place where Americans vote on bills in Congress. Visit our website to learn more about this and other topics Congress is working on. Publish Date 06/20/14 TIP SHEET House Bills 7 Senate Bills 4 Total 11 Unemployment rate 8% (2013 est.) Ethnicity 77.8% Ukrainian GDP per capita $7,400 (2013 est.) Russian 17.3% Belarusian 0.6% Moldovan 0.5% Crimean 0.5% Bulgarian 0.4% Hungarian 0.3% Romanian 0.3% Polish 0.3% Jewish 0.2% Other 1.8% Leading exports partners 2012 25.6% Russia 5.4% Turkey 4.2% Egypt Leading import partners 2012 32.4% 9.3% China 8% Germany
  2. 2. The crisis in Ukraine ignited a geopolitical crisis that experts have called the biggest conflict since the Cold War. Congress introduced 11 measures related to the crisis since the crisis began in November 2013, which included 5 resolutions in response to early protests by Ukrainians. Later, in response to Russian forces entering the Crimean Peninsula, Congress introduced 6 additional measures in support of Ukraine’s sovereignty and economic stability. www.votetocracy.com Votetocracy.com is a place where Americans vote on bills in Congress. Visit our website to learn more about this and other topics Congress is working on. Publish Date 06/20/14 TIP SHEET Congress Supports Early Protests of Ukrainian People with Five Resolutions: The crisis was sparked in November 2013 when Ukraine’s then President Viktor Yanukovych suspended talks toward a Ukraine-EU agreement in favor of a $15 billion loan from Russia. This was widely seen as Russia buying influence over Ukraine’s future through its close relationship with then President Yanukovych. Hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians responded with peaceful protests for government accountability and closer ties with the European Union. The crisis highlighted state level corruption and divisions between the pro-Europe native Ukrainian speakers in the west and the ethnic Russian speakers living in eastern Ukraine. During the early protests, the US Congress introduced 5 resolutions in support of democracy in Ukraine. In November 2014, Representative Engel (D-NY) introduced House Resolution 402 to support Ukraine and other countries in the region to partner with the European Union (EU), and “calls on Russia to respect the rights of states to make their own sovereign choices with regard to international partnerships.” As Yanukovych government retaliated with a range of anti-democratic measures, Congress introduced 4 more resolutions to condemn the measure and support Ukrainians’ right to protest. Congress passed Senate Resolution 319 and House Resolution 447 to condemn the violence and support a peaceful resolution to the crisis. Two additional resolutions related to the crisis were introduced but not passed. Senator Menendez (D-NJ), Chair of the Foreign Related Hearings (1) March 6, 2014 Hearing held by House Committee on Foreign Affairs: US Foreign Policy Toward Ukraine http://foreignaffairs.house.gov/hearing/ hearing-us-foreign-policy-toward-ukraine Eric Rubin - Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State http://docs.house.gov/meetings/FA/ FA00/20140306/101855/HHRG-113-FA00- Wstate-RubinE-20140306.pdf Paige Alexander - Assistant Administrator , Bureau for Europe and Eurasia at the U.S. Agency for International Development http://docs.house.gov/meetings/FA/ FA00/20140306/101855/HHRG-113-FA00- Wstate-AlexanderP-20140306.pdf Daleep Singh - Deputy Assistant Secretary for Europe and Eurasia at the U.S. Department of the Treasury http://docs.house.gov/meetings/FA/ FA00/20140306/101855/HHRG-113-FA00- Wstate-SinghD-20140306.pdf
  3. 3. www.votetocracy.com Votetocracy.com is a place where Americans vote on bills in Congress. Visit our website to learn more about this and other topics Congress is working on. Publish Date 06/20/14 TIP SHEET Relations Committee, introduced Senate Resolution 357, to express concern over the government’s anti-democratic measures and use of paramilitary forces against civilians. In addition, House Resolution 28 was proposed to condemn the Yanukovych government’s persecution of political prisoners including Yulia Tymoshenko, a former President of Ukraine and head of the “Orange Coalition.” Six More Pieces of Legislation in Response to Fall of Ukraine’s Government and Russia’s Takeover of Crimea: On February 20, 2014, the Yanukovych government escalated violence when Ukrainian security forces fired live ammunition on anti-government protestors that had been camped out in Kiev square. Hundreds died and thousands more were injured—more fatalities on than any day since Ukraine’s struggle for independence. The next day, parliament condemned the actions and stripped Yanukovych of his power. Yanukovych fled the capital having lost both popular and political support. Ukraine’s parliament voted in an interim government and set special elections for May 25, 2014. The interim government included some ultra-nationalist elements. In contrast with the ousted former President Yanukovych, the Interim Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk is viewed to have close ties with US and Europe. In response to the interim government in Kiev, some pro-Russia demonstrations arose in eastern cities, such as Kharkiv and Donetsk. President Putin rejected the legitimacy of the interim government and moved Russian troops into Crimea. President Putin claims Russian troops are in Crimea to protect ethnic Russians during the Ukrainian political crisis. The Crimean Peninsula is a semi-autonomous part of Ukraine with a complicated history and strong ties to Russia. The military forces are additional to the 11,000 troops already on the bases Russia leases on the peninsula. Crimean voted to break Crimea away from Ukraine and join Russia in a controversial referendum was held on March 16, 2014. Congress introduced two resolutions and four bills in response to Russia’s takeover of Crimea. Senate Resolution 370 and House Resolution 499 both condemn Russian military aggression into Ukraine and support the territorial integrity of Ukraine. The resolution calls on the US and its allies to put international pressure on Russia through a number of measures that include sanctions on Russian officials, economic sanctions, and boycotting the upcoming G-8 summit. (2) January 15, 2014 Hearing held by the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations: Implications of the Crisis in Ukraine http://www.foreign.senate.gov/hearings/ business-meeting-and-implications-of-the-crisis- in-ukraine-hearing Victoria Nuland - Assistant Secretary, Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State http://www.foreign.senate.gov/imo/media/ doc/Nuland_Testimony1.pdf Mr. Thomas Melia - Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor at the U.S. Department of State http://www.foreign.senate.gov/imo/media/ doc/Melia_Testimony4.pdf Dr. Zbigniew K. Brzezinski - Former U.S. National Security Advisor Counselor and Trustee at the Center for Strategic and International Studies * A closed hearing was held on February 25, 2014 by the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations titled the Situation in Ukraine. Hearings that are closed to the public usually contain top secret information. Victoria Nuland, Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State testified. Click bill links to vote on the bill and send your vote to your Rep and Senators
  4. 4. www.votetocracy.com Votetocracy.com is a place where Americans vote on bills in Congress. Visit our website to learn more about this and other topics Congress is working on. Publish Date 06/20/14 TIP SHEET H.R. 4152, a bill to provide for the costs of loan guarantees for Ukraine, passed both the House and Senate. H.R. 4278, the Ukraine Support Act, includes measures to strengthen civil society and promote economic stability in Ukraine. It also authorizes sanctions directed at Russian individuals involved in the recent political crisis threatening Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. House passed H.R. 4278 on March 27, 2014. S. 2124 is similar to H.R. 4278 in some ways, but also proposes changes to the US position with the International Monetary Fund and sanctions for Ukrainians involved in the recent political crisis. Also, H.R. 4154 would deny US visas to Russian officials until Russian military intervention in Ukraine has ceased. 1. H. Resolution 447 - Supporting the democratic and European aspirations of the people of Ukraine, and their right to choose their own future free of intimidation and fear. (Passed 2/10/2014) e 2. S. Resolution 319 - A resolution expressing support for the Ukrainian people in light of President Yanukovych’s decision not to sign an Association Agreement with the European Union. (Passed 1/7/2014) e 3. S. Resolution 357 - A resolution expressing concern of undemocratic governance and the abuse of the rights of individuals in Ukraine.e 4. H. Resolution 402 - Supporting the European aspirations of the peoples of the European Union’s Eastern Partnership countries, and for other purposese 5. H. Resolution 28 - Condemning the persecution of political opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko as well as other political prisoners, among them former internal affairs minister Yuri Lutsenko. e 6. S. Resolution 370 - A resolution supporting the territorial integrity of Ukraine and condemning Russian military aggression in Ukraine.e 7. H. Resolution 499 - Condemning the violation of Ukrainian sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity by military forces of the Russian Federation. (Passed 3/11/2014) e 8. H.R.4152 - To provide for the costs of loan guarantees for Ukraine (Passed in House, 3/6/2014) e 9. H.R.4154 - To deny visas and entry to the United States to officials and employees of the Government of the Russian Federation due to the Russian military intervention in Ukraine, and for other purposes. e 10. H.R. 4278 - Ukraine Support Act (Passed in House, 3/27/2014) e 11. S. 2124 - Support for the Sovereignty, Integrity, Democracy, and Economic Stability of Ukraine Act of 2014 e Source https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/ the-world-factbook/geos/up.html Supplementary Data: Population: 44,291,413 (July 2014 est.) Ethnic groups: Ukrainian 77.8%, Russian 17.3%, Belarusian 0.6%, Moldovan 0.5%, Crimean Tatar 0.5%, Bulgarian 0.4%, Hungarian 0.3%, Romanian 0.3%, Polish 0.3%, Jewish 0.2%, other 1.8% (2001 census) GDP per capita: $7,400 (2013 est.) GDP by sector (2013 est.): agriculture: 9.9%, industry: 29.6%, services: 60.5% Unemployment rate: 8% (2013 est.) Population below poverty line: 24.1% (2010) Public debt: 40.6% of GDP (2013 est.) Exports - partners: Russia 25.6%, Turkey 5.4%, Egypt 4.2% (2012) Imports - partners: Russia 32.4%, China 9.3%, Germany 8%, Belarus 6%, Poland 4.2% (2012)

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